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Old May 12th 11, 10:10 PM posted to alt.architecture,alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Default And one remained standing - earthquake resistant design

Pretty cool idea on how to deal with all of the shear forces and
shaking.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...667119026.html

R

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Old May 12th 11, 10:36 PM posted to alt.architecture,alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Default And one remained standing - earthquake resistant design

On Thu, 12 May 2011 14:10:09 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour wrote:

Pretty cool idea on how to deal with all of the shear forces and
shaking.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...667119026.html

R


cool indeed.
it was probably mounted on those things like they use in SF these days.
ao that when you do have a quake, all the building does is rock back and
forth a little.
did you note that their was music heard from the built in sound system?
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Old May 13th 11, 12:48 AM posted to alt.architecture,alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Default And one remained standing - earthquake resistant design

RicodJour wrote:

Pretty cool idea on how to deal with all of the shear forces and
shaking.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...667119026.html

R


According to the article they reduced the mass of the building by using
steel slabs instead of concrete and they were able to incorporate hefty
steel columns in the architecture. Maybe the article missed relevant
details but that doesn't look very innovative. While the steel
orthotropic slab thing tends to be too cost-prohibitive and therefore used
mostly to bridges, the column thing tends to be avoided because architects
shy away from big, imposing columns in their projects. Other than that,
it appears to be a regular structure designed to widstand the expected
seismic action.

The earthquake video is very interesting, though.


Rui Maciel
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Old May 20th 11, 12:23 PM posted to alt.architecture,alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Default And one remained standing - earthquake resistant design

On May 12, 5:10*pm, RicodJour wrote:
Pretty cool idea on how to deal with all of the shear forces and
shaking.http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...57630524366711...

R


Rather than point loads, ie., columns, spread it over a broad distance
of smaller supports, thus lightening all of it and less apt to sway.
The foundation acted like a shock absorber on the effects of the
quake.


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