Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #11   Report Post  
Old December 27th 09, 04:42 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2008
Posts: 18,563
Default Where to store left over bricks

On Sat, 26 Dec 2009 18:32:21 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) "
wrote:

On Dec 26, 8:13*pm, "
wrote:
aemeijers wrote:
On Dec 26, 6:19 pm, dalemstevens wrote:
My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick
from the original construction. *He wants to get rid of them after all
this time to make room for whatever. *I think it is a shame to haul
them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for some
reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a
stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the road
and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the hole
did not match too well). *If he could figure out where to store them
without them being in the way too much they would stay. *What could be
done with them?


Oh, definitely hold on to them. You are quite right, as soon as they
are gone you will need them. Say, water gets behind a wall, freezes,
and cracks a few. Or ivy peels the face off a couple dozen. Or he or
the next owner wants to change a window, or redo a failed chimney
stack. *Basement or crawlspace available? One annoying day getting
them down there, and then forget about them till needed. Probably no
more time than hauling them to the landfill, unless he has a truck.
Stacked flat 7 or 8 high along one wall, like in the furnace room,
they will not take up much usable footprint. If he has storage shelves


They make lovely shelves....make two or three short stacks, lay a board
across, repeat. *I used some landscape pavers and rather inexpensive
prefinished shelves from HD to make shelves for guestroom...can change
layout or add to it if needed.



in basement, they can go behind and under the bottom shelf. If he has
the space, dry-stack them carefully interlaced into a couple
pedestals, throw a solid door over the top, and use as a workbench.
Always a good idea to keep some spares on hand for stuff like that.
(oddball trim, wierd electrical plates, ceramic tile, kitchen drawer
pulls, etc.)


If his heart is set on getting rid of them, at least donate them to
Habitat ReStore or something.


--
aem sends....- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


250 bricks will make a lot of bookshelves. But I can't believe only
the "face" is waterproof. Every house I have seen that is brick has
not only the face exposed, but also 3/8" of the top, sides and
bottom. I would go for a false wall along side an existing basement
wall. Find some place to store them, or offer 200 of them for sale on
a local bulletin board. Definitely keep at least 50 of them for some
unforeseen circumstance.

It IS true that some bricks are not waterproof on the top and bottom
faces, but more serious is water freezing in the "cores" of the brick
expanding and splitting the brick. This is a very real possibility
when stored outside at or near ground level.

The OP does not specify if they are concrete or clay bricks - and if
concrete what type. An autoclaved concrete (man-made stone) brick is a
totally different animal than a normal portland cement brick - and
even then the aggregate used makes a big difference in how well they
stand wet freeze-thaw cycles.

  #12   Report Post  
Old December 27th 09, 02:23 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,933
Default Where to store left over bricks

On Dec 26, 6:36*pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 12/26/2009 4:19 PM dalemstevens spake thus:

My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick
from the original construction. *He wants to get rid of them after all
this time to make room for whatever. *I think it is a shame to haul
them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for some
reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a
stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the road
and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the hole
did not match too well). *If he could figure out where to store them
without them being in the way too much they would stay. *What could be
done with them?


Well, if it hasn't already occurred to you, the bricks could be stored
perfectly well outside without worrying about damage. You could pave an
area, or just stack them behind, under or around something. When it
comes time to use them, just wash them off and you're good to go.

--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy neighbours.

- harvested from Usenet


Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing,
some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far
as just "wash them off" thats a crock of bs unless you dont care if
the mortar might fail in 20 years, since when does mortar bond to dirt
or mold, brick is porus he would have to acid wash them, and some
types of brick change color with acid. They are best stored dry,
inside or out and covered to keep off dirt.
  #13   Report Post  
Old December 27th 09, 10:43 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2008
Posts: 960
Default Where to store left over bricks


"ransley" wrote in message
...
On Dec 26, 6:36 pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 12/26/2009 4:19 PM dalemstevens spake thus:

My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick
from the original construction. He wants to get rid of them after all
this time to make room for whatever. I think it is a shame to haul
them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for some
reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a
stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the road
and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the hole
did not match too well). If he could figure out where to store them
without them being in the way too much they would stay. What could be
done with them?


Well, if it hasn't already occurred to you, the bricks could be stored
perfectly well outside without worrying about damage. You could pave an
area, or just stack them behind, under or around something. When it
comes time to use them, just wash them off and you're good to go.

--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy neighbours.

- harvested from Usenet


Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing,
some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far
as just "wash them off" thats a crock of bs unless you dont care if
the mortar might fail in 20 years, since when does mortar bond to dirt
or mold, brick is porus he would have to acid wash them, and some
types of brick change color with acid. They are best stored dry,
inside or out and covered to keep off dirt.

I would tend to agree with Ransley atleast from what I've seen on
jobsites...The bricks are delivered on pallets and shrink wrapped...Once on
site they are covered with tarps or lumber covers as well....Buy a few
pallets and tarps and you should be good....Why chance it unless using them
as pavers is all you're gonna do...Around here(coastal Maine) old bricks
bring a pretty penny...Alot of historic renovations and rich city folk who
think old stuff is chic...LOL...There are 2 places near me that buys and
sells old bricks , beams , barnboards , windows , doors , hardware ,
hardwood flooring , tubs , toilets ect. , ect. .....No need to fill up the
land fill with them...I bet if you looked you would find somebody to buy and
haul them off...Keep a few of course...

  #14   Report Post  
Old December 27th 09, 11:06 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 947
Default Where to store left over bricks

On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 16:43:08 -0500, benick wrote:

"ransley" wrote in message
...
On Dec 26, 6:36 pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 12/26/2009 4:19 PM dalemstevens spake thus:

My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick
from the original construction. He wants to get rid of them after all
this time to make room for whatever. I think it is a shame to haul
them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for some
reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a
stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the road
and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the hole
did not match too well). If he could figure out where to store them
without them being in the way too much they would stay. What could be
done with them?


Well, if it hasn't already occurred to you, the bricks could be stored
perfectly well outside without worrying about damage. You could pave an
area, or just stack them behind, under or around something. When it
comes time to use them, just wash them off and you're good to go.

--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy neighbours.

- harvested from Usenet


Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing,
some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far


What process, pray tell, deteriorates unassembled bricks as opposed to
assembled brick walls?
  #15   Report Post  
Old December 27th 09, 11:39 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2008
Posts: 960
Default Where to store left over bricks


"AZ Nomad" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 16:43:08 -0500, benick wrote:

"ransley" wrote in message
...
On Dec 26, 6:36 pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 12/26/2009 4:19 PM dalemstevens spake thus:

My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick
from the original construction. He wants to get rid of them after all
this time to make room for whatever. I think it is a shame to haul
them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for some
reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a
stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the road
and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the hole
did not match too well). If he could figure out where to store them
without them being in the way too much they would stay. What could be
done with them?

Well, if it hasn't already occurred to you, the bricks could be stored
perfectly well outside without worrying about damage. You could pave an
area, or just stack them behind, under or around something. When it
comes time to use them, just wash them off and you're good to go.

--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy neighbours.

- harvested from Usenet


Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing,
some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far


What process, pray tell, deteriorates unassembled bricks as opposed to
assembled brick walls?



Not that I'm an expert but a quick Bing search got this...HTH...

PROTECTION

Storage of Materials

The manner in which materials are stored at the construction site may have
an influence on their future performance. Materials should be stored to
avoid wetting by rain or snow, and also avoid contamination by salts or
other matter which may contribute to efflorescence and staining.



Source...gobrick.com Tecnical
Notes....http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t21c.htm



  #16   Report Post  
Old December 28th 09, 01:31 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 947
Default Where to store left over bricks

On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 17:39:06 -0500, benick wrote:

"AZ Nomad" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 16:43:08 -0500, benick wrote:

"ransley" wrote in message
...
On Dec 26, 6:36 pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 12/26/2009 4:19 PM dalemstevens spake thus:

My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick
from the original construction. He wants to get rid of them after all
this time to make room for whatever. I think it is a shame to haul
them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for some
reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a
stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the road
and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the hole
did not match too well). If he could figure out where to store them
without them being in the way too much they would stay. What could be
done with them?

Well, if it hasn't already occurred to you, the bricks could be stored
perfectly well outside without worrying about damage. You could pave an
area, or just stack them behind, under or around something. When it
comes time to use them, just wash them off and you're good to go.

--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy neighbours.

- harvested from Usenet


Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing,
some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far


What process, pray tell, deteriorates unassembled bricks as opposed to
assembled brick walls?



Not that I'm an expert but a quick Bing search got this...HTH...


PROTECTION


Storage of Materials


The manner in which materials are stored at the construction site may have
an influence on their future performance. Materials should be stored to
avoid wetting by rain or snow, and also avoid contamination by salts or
other matter which may contribute to efflorescence and staining.


Not all materials are equal. No mention of bricks, I can't assume that
your cite has the slightest bearing on storing bricks.
  #17   Report Post  
Old December 28th 09, 03:04 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2008
Posts: 960
Default Where to store left over bricks


"AZ Nomad" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 17:39:06 -0500, benick wrote:

"AZ Nomad" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 16:43:08 -0500, benick wrote:

"ransley" wrote in message
...
On Dec 26, 6:36 pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 12/26/2009 4:19 PM dalemstevens spake thus:

My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick
from the original construction. He wants to get rid of them after
all
this time to make room for whatever. I think it is a shame to haul
them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for
some
reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a
stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the
road
and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the
hole
did not match too well). If he could figure out where to store them
without them being in the way too much they would stay. What could
be
done with them?

Well, if it hasn't already occurred to you, the bricks could be stored
perfectly well outside without worrying about damage. You could pave
an
area, or just stack them behind, under or around something. When it
comes time to use them, just wash them off and you're good to go.

--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy
neighbours.

- harvested from Usenet

Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing,
some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far

What process, pray tell, deteriorates unassembled bricks as opposed to
assembled brick walls?



Not that I'm an expert but a quick Bing search got this...HTH...


PROTECTION


Storage of Materials


The manner in which materials are stored at the construction site may have
an influence on their future performance. Materials should be stored to
avoid wetting by rain or snow, and also avoid contamination by salts or
other matter which may contribute to efflorescence and staining.


Not all materials are equal. No mention of bricks, I can't assume that
your cite has the slightest bearing on storing bricks.


Try READING the link...IT IS TALKING ABOUT BRICKS hence the name of the
website gobrick.com and cites the Brick Institute of America.....


PROTECTION

Storage of Materials

The manner in which materials are stored at the construction site may have
an influence on their future performance. Materials should be stored to
avoid wetting by rain or snow, and also avoid contamination by salts or
other matter which may contribute to efflorescence and staining.

Masonry Units. Masonry units should be stored off the ground to avoid
contamination by dirt and by ground water which may contain soluble salts.
They should also be covered by a water-resistant membrane to keep them dry.

Cementitious Materials. Cementitious materials for mortar should be stored
off the ground and under cover.

Sand. Sand for mortar should also be stored on high ground, or ideally, off
the ground to prevent contamination from dirt, organic materials and ground
water, any of which may contribute to efflorescence and may be deleterious
to mortar performance. In addition, it is advisable to store sand and other
aggregates under a protective cover. This will avoid saturation and freezing
in cold weather.

Flashing. Flashing materials should be stored in places where they will not
be punctured or damaged. Plastic and asphalt coated flashing materials
should not be stored in areas exposed to sunlight. Ultraviolet rays from the
sun break down these materials, causing them to become brittle with time.
Plastic flashing exposed to the weather at the site for months before
installation should not be used. During installation, flashing must be
pliable so that no cracks occur at corners or bends.



EVERYTHING is to be off the ground and covered....Atleast according to the
experts of which I'm not ..From what I've seen over the last 20 years of
being on jobsites , that's how the pro's do it as well ...Cite a website
that says different....

  #18   Report Post  
Old December 28th 09, 05:19 AM posted to alt.home.repair
mm mm is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 7,835
Default Where to store left over bricks

On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 17:39:06 -0500, "benick"
wrote:


"AZ Nomad" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 16:43:08 -0500, benick wrote:

"ransley" wrote in message
...
On Dec 26, 6:36 pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 12/26/2009 4:19 PM dalemstevens spake thus:

My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick
from the original construction. He wants to get rid of them after all
this time to make room for whatever. I think it is a shame to haul
them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for some
reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a
stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the road
and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the hole
did not match too well). If he could figure out where to store them
without them being in the way too much they would stay. What could be
done with them?

Well, if it hasn't already occurred to you, the bricks could be stored
perfectly well outside without worrying about damage. You could pave an
area, or just stack them behind, under or around something. When it
comes time to use them, just wash them off and you're good to go.

--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy neighbours.

- harvested from Usenet


Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing,
some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far


What process, pray tell, deteriorates unassembled bricks as opposed to
assembled brick walls?



Not that I'm an expert but a quick Bing search got this...HTH...

PROTECTION

Storage of Materials

The manner in which materials are stored at the construction site may have
an influence on their future performance. Materials should be stored to
avoid wetting by rain or snow, and also avoid contamination by salts or
other matter which may contribute to efflorescence and staining.



Source...gobrick.com Tecnical
Notes....http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t21c.htm


Next time, please leave a blank space before and after a url. That
way it will be noticable -- I didn't see it either -- it will show up
as a link in people's newsreaders, it will be a different color, and
it will be clickable, like this

Notes.... http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t21c.htm

But while you say "Try READING the link" you should try reading his
post. It's all of 13 words and it asks about why unassembled bricks
would deteriorate differerntly from assembeld bricks. Your link
doesn't address that.
  #19   Report Post  
Old December 28th 09, 06:21 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2008
Posts: 960
Default Where to store left over bricks


"mm" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 17:39:06 -0500, "benick"
wrote:


"AZ Nomad" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 16:43:08 -0500, benick wrote:

"ransley" wrote in message
...
On Dec 26, 6:36 pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 12/26/2009 4:19 PM dalemstevens spake thus:

My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick
from the original construction. He wants to get rid of them after
all
this time to make room for whatever. I think it is a shame to haul
them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for
some
reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a
stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the
road
and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the
hole
did not match too well). If he could figure out where to store them
without them being in the way too much they would stay. What could
be
done with them?

Well, if it hasn't already occurred to you, the bricks could be stored
perfectly well outside without worrying about damage. You could pave
an
area, or just stack them behind, under or around something. When it
comes time to use them, just wash them off and you're good to go.

--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy
neighbours.

- harvested from Usenet

Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing,
some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far

What process, pray tell, deteriorates unassembled bricks as opposed to
assembled brick walls?



Not that I'm an expert but a quick Bing search got this...HTH...

PROTECTION

Storage of Materials

The manner in which materials are stored at the construction site may have
an influence on their future performance. Materials should be stored to
avoid wetting by rain or snow, and also avoid contamination by salts or
other matter which may contribute to efflorescence and staining.



Source...gobrick.com Tecnical
Notes....http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t21c.htm


Next time, please leave a blank space before and after a url. That
way it will be noticable -- I didn't see it either -- it will show up
as a link in people's newsreaders, it will be a different color, and
it will be clickable, like this

Notes.... http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t21c.htm

But while you say "Try READING the link" you should try reading his
post. It's all of 13 words and it asks about why unassembled bricks
would deteriorate differerntly from assembeld bricks. Your link
doesn't address that.


  #20   Report Post  
Old December 28th 09, 06:22 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2008
Posts: 18,563
Default Where to store left over bricks

On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 16:06:40 -0600, AZ Nomad
wrote:

On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 16:43:08 -0500, benick wrote:

"ransley" wrote in message
...
On Dec 26, 6:36 pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 12/26/2009 4:19 PM dalemstevens spake thus:

My dad has a 25 year old home for which he has saved some 250 brick
from the original construction. He wants to get rid of them after all
this time to make room for whatever. I think it is a shame to haul
them off to the landfill when as soon as he does so something for some
reason or another will come up where they are needed (I know it is a
stretch, but for example a couple of years ago a car ran off the road
and into a home...you guessed it, the new bricks used to fix the hole
did not match too well). If he could figure out where to store them
without them being in the way too much they would stay. What could be
done with them?

Well, if it hasn't already occurred to you, the bricks could be stored
perfectly well outside without worrying about damage. You could pave an
area, or just stack them behind, under or around something. When it
comes time to use them, just wash them off and you're good to go.

--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy neighbours.

- harvested from Usenet


Untrue, they will deteriorate from being water soaked and freezing,
some go in 5 years, some last 50 but most all will be weakened. As far


What process, pray tell, deteriorates unassembled bricks as opposed to
assembled brick walls?

Assembled brick walls are protected from water entry at the top, and
open to drain at the bottom - so do not saturate with water - which
then freezes.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How old are these bricks? Bitstreams UK diy 9 October 27th 07 01:16 AM
Where to buy air bricks? dog-man UK diy 7 September 4th 06 05:21 AM
How to cut bricks? Walter R. Home Repair 6 July 13th 06 05:26 AM
bricks [email protected] UK diy 10 April 6th 05 07:05 AM
Air bricks John Miller UK diy 8 October 23rd 04 01:40 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:52 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017