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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

Hi,

I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.

But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:

1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A

Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.

So which way is better?

Many thanks in advance,

Aaron
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Default Best cable splitting strategy.


"Aaron Fude" wrote in message
...
Hi,

I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.

But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:

1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A

Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.

So which way is better?

Many thanks in advance,

Aaron


You might consider an active splitter such as:
http://www.anadigics.com/products/ca...itters/aps3604
but it requires AC power so needs to be located near an outlet.

Joe J


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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

Aaron Fude wrote:
Hi,

I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.

But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:

1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A

Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.

So which way is better?

Many thanks in advance,

Aaron


Check out this page
http://www.yourbroadbandstore.com/so...e-splitter.php

See TechTip #1 at bottom of page re use of "unbalanced" 3 way splitter
(1 port gets half signal, other 2 get 1/4 each)
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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

On Jul 12, 1:31*pm, "Joe J." wrote:
"Aaron Fude" wrote in message

...





Hi,


I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.


But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:


1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A


Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.


So which way is better?


Many thanks in advance,


Aaron


You might consider an active splitter such as:http://www.anadigics.com/products/ca...e_splitters/ap...
but it requires AC power so needs to be located near an outlet.

Joe J- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


You cant use a cable modem after an amplifier. Amplifiers are one way
devices cable boxes are two way devices.
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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

JIMMIE wrote:
On Jul 12, 1:31 pm, "Joe J." wrote:
"Aaron Fude" wrote in message

...





Hi,
I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.
But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:
1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A
Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.
So which way is better?
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron

You might consider an active splitter such as:http://www.anadigics.com/products/ca...e_splitters/ap...
but it requires AC power so needs to be located near an outlet.

Joe J- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


You cant use a cable modem after an amplifier. Amplifiers are one way
devices cable boxes are two way devices.


Some have a passive return path and are intended for that use.


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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

Aaron Fude wrote:
Hi,

I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.

But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:

1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A

Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.

So which way is better?

Many thanks in advance,


Try option #1. If everything work, leave it alone, otherwise go for #2.


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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

On Jul 12, 4:11*pm, George wrote:
JIMMIE wrote:
On Jul 12, 1:31 pm, "Joe J." wrote:
"Aaron Fude" wrote in message


....


Hi,
I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.
But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:
1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A
Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.
So which way is better?
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
You might consider an active splitter such as:http://www.anadigics.com/products/ca...e_splitters/ap...
but it requires AC power so needs to be located near an outlet.


Joe J- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


You cant use a cable modem after an amplifier. Amplifiers are one way
devices cable boxes are two way devices.


Some have a passive return path and are intended for that use.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Really, where can you get a bidirectional amp like this. I was told by
my cable company I could not use my amplified distribution system with
my cable modem or cable box because of this and there was no amp
available that would fit my needs.

Jimmie
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Default Best cable splitting strategy.


"JIMMIE" wrote in message
...
On Jul 12, 4:11 pm, George wrote:
JIMMIE wrote:
On Jul 12, 1:31 pm, "Joe J." wrote:
"Aaron Fude" wrote in message


Some have a passive return path and are intended for that use.- Hide
quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


Really, where can you get a bidirectional amp like this. I was told by
my cable company I could not use my amplified distribution system with
my cable modem or cable box because of this and there was no amp
available that would fit my needs.


Jimmie


I don't know about your needs, but there are lots of bidirectional amps for
under $ 50. Here is one:
http://www.audio-discounters.com/cda-1p.html

Radio Shack advertises them also.


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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

On Jul 12, 4:46*pm, JIMMIE wrote:
On Jul 12, 4:11*pm, George wrote:



JIMMIE wrote:
On Jul 12, 1:31 pm, "Joe J." wrote:
"Aaron Fude" wrote in message


...


Hi,
I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.
But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:
1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A
Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal..
So which way is better?
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
You might consider an active splitter such as:http://www.anadigics.com/products/ca...e_splitters/ap...
but it requires AC power so needs to be located near an outlet.


Joe J- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


You cant use a cable modem after an amplifier. Amplifiers are one way
devices cable boxes are two way devices.


Some have a passive return path and are intended for that use.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


Really, where can you get a bidirectional amp like this. I was told by
my cable company I could not use my amplified distribution system with
my cable modem or cable box because of this *and there was no amp
available that would fit my needs.

Jimmie


Walmart has them.
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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

On Jul 12, 1:15*pm, Aaron Fude wrote:
Hi,

I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.

But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:

1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A

Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.

So which way is better?

Many thanks in advance,

Aaron


I just installed a cable modem. The speed was okay but not great.
The cable company sent a tech out. He said they ALWAYS split for the
modem right after the grounding clamp. He put on a 3 way where there
had been a 2 way and ran a line directly to the modem. I have a TV
right near it and asked about putting in a splitter for that. He said
to use the existing (old) wire for the TV and to keep nothing but the
modem on the dedicated wire.

I have a signal booster for the TV (because the signal was not too
good) and picked up a two-way booster at Walmart. It turns out the
signal was bad because of the grounding clamp was bad. When he
replaced it it made a huge difference.


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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

Aaron Fude wrote:
Hi,

I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.

But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:

1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A

Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.

So which way is better?

Many thanks in advance,

Aaron

Hi,
I never had weak signal problem when splitting cable.
You can try any way you prefer but use good quality parts
and cables.
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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

JIMMIE wrote:
On Jul 12, 4:11 pm, George wrote:
JIMMIE wrote:
On Jul 12, 1:31 pm, "Joe J." wrote:
"Aaron Fude" wrote in message
...
Hi,
I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.
But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:
1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A
Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.
So which way is better?
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
You might consider an active splitter such as:http://www.anadigics.com/products/ca...e_splitters/ap...
but it requires AC power so needs to be located near an outlet.
Joe J- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
You cant use a cable modem after an amplifier. Amplifiers are one way
devices cable boxes are two way devices.

Some have a passive return path and are intended for that use.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Really, where can you get a bidirectional amp like this. I was told by
my cable company I could not use my amplified distribution system with
my cable modem or cable box because of this and there was no amp
available that would fit my needs.

Jimmie


Commonly available. The reason the cable companies discourage using them
is because people buy them because they have a bunch of incorrectly
configured cheap splitters or have poor wiring. The amplifier just masks
the problem. When they remotely manage the equipment the levels will not
correctly reflect system levels.

Cable companies are typically pretty good about making sure there is
sufficient signal. Around here if you have signal issues they will
adjust them as required. Anytime I have seen an installation that seems
to need an amplifier it can be fixed by clipping off all of the twist on
coax connectors, terminating the cables properly and using quality
splitters that are arranged properly.
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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

PatM wrote:
On Jul 12, 1:15 pm, Aaron Fude wrote:
Hi,

I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.

But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:

1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A

Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.

So which way is better?

Many thanks in advance,

Aaron


I just installed a cable modem. The speed was okay but not great.
The cable company sent a tech out. He said they ALWAYS split for the
modem right after the grounding clamp. He put on a 3 way where there
had been a 2 way and ran a line directly to the modem. I have a TV
right near it and asked about putting in a splitter for that. He said
to use the existing (old) wire for the TV and to keep nothing but the
modem on the dedicated wire.

I have a signal booster for the TV (because the signal was not too
good) and picked up a two-way booster at Walmart. It turns out the
signal was bad because of the grounding clamp was bad. When he
replaced it it made a huge difference.


My buddy was asking about an amplifier. He bought one and there was no
improvement. I stopped by, clipped off a couple mickey mouse twist on
coax connectors and installed snap seals. Problem solved and no
amplifier required.
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Default Best cable splitting strategy.

Aaron Fude wrote:
Hi,

I know that the cable modem must have a pretty strong signal so it can
be downstream from a few splitters.

But I need to put in at least one or two. Where the cable comes in (A)
I have a single TV. The modem is in the next room (B) where there is
another TV. I'm choosing between two options:

1. 2-way splitter at location A and a 2-way splitter at location B.
2. 3-way splitter at location A

Way 1 is neater, but perhaps the modem gets only 1/4 of the signal.
Way 2 is more cumbersome, but perhaps the modem gets 1/3 the signal.

So which way is better?

Many thanks in advance,

Aaron

Ok, my 2 cents. I had my modem connected to the output of the first
splitter, then I got the digital cable box. The cable box was hooked
to the second splitter. I found that the on-demand wouldn't work, so
I switched the modem and cable box. The modem is on the second splitter
and the cable box on the first. Now they are both working just fine.

YMMV
Bill
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