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Default Switching Land Line Phone Companies

Is it true that if you switch to a local mom & pop outfit, Verizon
still has to correct infrastructure problems such as static that
emanates from outside the house?

If so, how does this work? Do you complain to your new local phone
provider who then contacts Verizon?

Will Verizon still deliver phone directories to you even though you
have dumped them? Thanks.

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Default Switching Land Line Phone Companies


"Murriel" wrote in message
...
Is it true that if you switch to a local mom & pop outfit, Verizon
still has to correct infrastructure problems such as static that
emanates from outside the house?

If so, how does this work? Do you complain to your new local phone
provider who then contacts Verizon?

Will Verizon still deliver phone directories to you even though you
have dumped them? Thanks.


You address your complaints directly to the new phone company, they, in turn
contact Verizon to initialize a repair request. The advantage to this method
is that you won't have to hear Verizon rolling on the floor laughing at you,
and in truth, you'll get service from Verizon, just as soon as ALL of their
regular customers are taken care of, or hell freezes over, whichever comes
first. I'd recommend voip


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Default Switching Land Line Phone Companies

RBM wrote:
"Murriel" wrote in message
...
Is it true that if you switch to a local mom & pop outfit, Verizon
still has to correct infrastructure problems such as static that
emanates from outside the house?

If so, how does this work? Do you complain to your new local phone
provider who then contacts Verizon?

Will Verizon still deliver phone directories to you even though you
have dumped them? Thanks.


You address your complaints directly to the new phone company, they, in turn
contact Verizon to initialize a repair request. The advantage to this method
is that you won't have to hear Verizon rolling on the floor laughing at you,
and in truth, you'll get service from Verizon, just as soon as ALL of their
regular customers are taken care of, or hell freezes over, whichever comes
first. I'd recommend voip

Well, as far as I can see, Verizon over
copper is the worse service I have
ever seen. My line here in western NC
has so much 60 Hz longitudinal hum
and clicking an popping. I never saw
this in IL. BTW, Verizon has just
announced they sold their land based
line business to Frontier. I don't know
anything
about them, but I don't think it can get
too much worse. Also, VOIP over
my Verizon DSL wouldn't work. There is
far to much slow downs in speed
and at times, the service just seems to
stop for a few seconds.
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Default Switching Land Line Phone Companies


"RBM" wrote in message
...

"Murriel" wrote in message
...
Is it true that if you switch to a local mom & pop outfit, Verizon
still has to correct infrastructure problems such as static that
emanates from outside the house?

If so, how does this work? Do you complain to your new local phone
provider who then contacts Verizon?

Will Verizon still deliver phone directories to you even though you
have dumped them? Thanks.


You address your complaints directly to the new phone company, they, in

turn
contact Verizon to initialize a repair request. The advantage to this

method
is that you won't have to hear Verizon rolling on the floor laughing at

you,
and in truth, you'll get service from Verizon, just as soon as ALL of

their
regular customers are taken care of, or hell freezes over, whichever comes
first. I'd recommend voip



Hell finally froze over and Verizon fixed my phone line. It only took seven
years. Sounds like it would have taken longer with a mom and pop company.
Mine used to go out whenever it got damp and when it rained it would make
long-distance calls and call 911 repeatedly. I cancelled my long distance
but they wouldn't let me cancel 911. One time the sheriff showed up in his
front-wheel drive cruizer when it was pouring down rain and I don't know how
he even made it down the dirt road in his car. After many complaints they
finally fixed the 911 problem and then it started calling 611 every time it
rained. At 95 cents per call it added up quickly. They would not let me
cancel 611. Now when it rains I can actually use my dialup service. I
managed to have all the bogus calls removed from my bills with Verizon. I
don't know if it would or would not have been as easy with another provider.
Verizon stinks but it could be worse.




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Default Switching Land Line Phone Companies

Ulysses wrote:
"RBM" wrote in message
...

"Murriel" wrote in message
...
Is it true that if you switch to a local mom & pop outfit, Verizon
still has to correct infrastructure problems such as static that
emanates from outside the house?

If so, how does this work? Do you complain to your new local phone
provider who then contacts Verizon?

Will Verizon still deliver phone directories to you even though you
have dumped them? Thanks.


You address your complaints directly to the new phone company, they,
in turn contact Verizon to initialize a repair request. The
advantage to this method is that you won't have to hear Verizon
rolling on the floor laughing at you, and in truth, you'll get
service from Verizon, just as soon as ALL of their regular customers
are taken care of, or hell freezes over, whichever comes first. I'd
recommend voip



Hell finally froze over and Verizon fixed my phone line. It only
took seven years. Sounds like it would have taken longer with a mom
and pop company. Mine used to go out whenever it got damp and when it
rained it would make long-distance calls and call 911 repeatedly. I
cancelled my long distance but they wouldn't let me cancel 911. One
time the sheriff showed up in his front-wheel drive cruizer when it
was pouring down rain and I don't know how he even made it down the
dirt road in his car. After many complaints they finally fixed the
911 problem and then it started calling 611 every time it rained. At
95 cents per call it added up quickly. They would not let me cancel
611. Now when it rains I can actually use my dialup service. I
managed to have all the bogus calls removed from my bills with
Verizon. I don't know if it would or would not have been as easy
with another provider. Verizon stinks but it could be worse.


Heh!

I used to get the cops knocking on my door about once a month in response to
a 911-hangup. After about a year, the problem was finally traced to a splice
on the cable. Some do-bads had tapped into our incoming fax line and were
using it to make local calls (there was no long-distance capability).
Evidently they were trying to call Honduras or Patagonia or somewhere whose
international calling prefix was +910 and missed.


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Default Switching Land Line Phone Companies


"Ulysses" wrote in message
...

"RBM" wrote in message
...

"Murriel" wrote in message
...
Is it true that if you switch to a local mom & pop outfit, Verizon
still has to correct infrastructure problems such as static that
emanates from outside the house?

If so, how does this work? Do you complain to your new local phone
provider who then contacts Verizon?

Will Verizon still deliver phone directories to you even though you
have dumped them? Thanks.


You address your complaints directly to the new phone company, they, in

turn
contact Verizon to initialize a repair request. The advantage to this

method
is that you won't have to hear Verizon rolling on the floor laughing at

you,
and in truth, you'll get service from Verizon, just as soon as ALL of

their
regular customers are taken care of, or hell freezes over, whichever
comes
first. I'd recommend voip



Hell finally froze over and Verizon fixed my phone line. It only took
seven
years. Sounds like it would have taken longer with a mom and pop company.
Mine used to go out whenever it got damp and when it rained it would make
long-distance calls and call 911 repeatedly. I cancelled my long distance
but they wouldn't let me cancel 911. One time the sheriff showed up in
his
front-wheel drive cruizer when it was pouring down rain and I don't know
how
he even made it down the dirt road in his car. After many complaints they
finally fixed the 911 problem and then it started calling 611 every time
it
rained. At 95 cents per call it added up quickly. They would not let me
cancel 611. Now when it rains I can actually use my dialup service. I
managed to have all the bogus calls removed from my bills with Verizon. I
don't know if it would or would not have been as easy with another
provider.
Verizon stinks but it could be worse.


That's the sad truth. Lots of folks have had nightmare stories with whatever
carrier they have, but just when you believe that it couldn't get worse...





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Default Switching Land Line Phone Companies

On Jun 18, 11:43*am, "HeyBub" wrote:
Ulysses wrote:
"RBM" wrote in message
...


"Murriel" wrote in message
...
Is it true that if you switch to a local mom & pop outfit, Verizon
still has to correct infrastructure problems such as static that
emanates from outside the house?


If so, how does this work? *Do you complain to your new local phone
provider who then contacts Verizon?


Will Verizon still deliver phone directories to you even though you
have dumped them? *Thanks.


You address your complaints directly to the new phone company, they,
in turn contact Verizon to initialize a repair request. The
advantage to this method is that you won't have to hear Verizon
rolling on the floor laughing at you, and in truth, you'll get
service from Verizon, just as soon as ALL of their regular customers
are taken care of, or hell freezes over, whichever comes first. I'd
recommend voip


Hell finally froze over and Verizon fixed my phone line. *It only
took seven years. *Sounds like it would have taken longer with a mom
and pop company. Mine used to go out whenever it got damp and when it
rained it would make long-distance calls and call 911 repeatedly. *I
cancelled my long distance but they wouldn't let me cancel 911. *One
time the sheriff showed up in his front-wheel drive cruizer when it
was pouring down rain and I don't know how he even made it down the
dirt road in his car. *After many complaints they finally fixed the
911 problem and then it started calling 611 every time it rained. *At
95 cents per call it added up quickly. *They would not let me cancel
611. *Now when it rains I can actually use my dialup service. *I
managed to have all the bogus calls removed from my bills with
Verizon. *I don't know if it would or would not have been as easy
with another provider. Verizon stinks but it could be worse.


Heh!

I used to get the cops knocking on my door about once a month in response to
a 911-hangup. After about a year, the problem was finally traced to a splice
on the cable. Some do-bads had tapped into our incoming fax line and were
using it to make local calls (there was no long-distance capability).
Evidently they were trying to call Honduras or Patagonia or somewhere whose
international calling prefix was +910 and missed.


Apparently this 911 calling due to a bad connection or short is
common. How it manages to get the right dialing combination is quite
amazing. I had it happen to me here in NJ. First, the phone
service was out one morning. Before calling Verizon, I thought I'd
just wait a couple hours and see if it came back. It did. But that
afternoon, the police showed up due to a 911 hangup call. Before
Verizon fixed it later that day, the police showed up again.
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Default Switching Land Line Phone Companies


wrote in message
...
On Jun 18, 11:43 am, "HeyBub" wrote:
Ulysses wrote:
"RBM" wrote in message
...


"Murriel" wrote in message
...
Is it true that if you switch to a local mom & pop outfit, Verizon
still has to correct infrastructure problems such as static that
emanates from outside the house?


If so, how does this work? Do you complain to your new local phone
provider who then contacts Verizon?


Will Verizon still deliver phone directories to you even though you
have dumped them? Thanks.


You address your complaints directly to the new phone company, they,
in turn contact Verizon to initialize a repair request. The
advantage to this method is that you won't have to hear Verizon
rolling on the floor laughing at you, and in truth, you'll get
service from Verizon, just as soon as ALL of their regular customers
are taken care of, or hell freezes over, whichever comes first. I'd
recommend voip


Hell finally froze over and Verizon fixed my phone line. It only
took seven years. Sounds like it would have taken longer with a mom
and pop company. Mine used to go out whenever it got damp and when it
rained it would make long-distance calls and call 911 repeatedly. I
cancelled my long distance but they wouldn't let me cancel 911. One
time the sheriff showed up in his front-wheel drive cruizer when it
was pouring down rain and I don't know how he even made it down the
dirt road in his car. After many complaints they finally fixed the
911 problem and then it started calling 611 every time it rained. At
95 cents per call it added up quickly. They would not let me cancel
611. Now when it rains I can actually use my dialup service. I
managed to have all the bogus calls removed from my bills with
Verizon. I don't know if it would or would not have been as easy
with another provider. Verizon stinks but it could be worse.


Heh!

I used to get the cops knocking on my door about once a month in response

to
a 911-hangup. After about a year, the problem was finally traced to a

splice
on the cable. Some do-bads had tapped into our incoming fax line and were
using it to make local calls (there was no long-distance capability).
Evidently they were trying to call Honduras or Patagonia or somewhere

whose
international calling prefix was +910 and missed.


Apparently this 911 calling due to a bad connection or short is
common. How it manages to get the right dialing combination is quite
amazing. I had it happen to me here in NJ. First, the phone
service was out one morning. Before calling Verizon, I thought I'd
just wait a couple hours and see if it came back. It did. But that
afternoon, the police showed up due to a 911 hangup call. Before
Verizon fixed it later that day, the police showed up again.

First it was 911, then 411. Now, if I could get it do dial 611 then maybe
I'd be getting somewhere. When I complained about the long-distance calls
they told me that if I wasn't making them then someone was tapping into my
phone line--at 3 am in pouring down rain. Right. Never mind that I told
them the wires were crossed (shorted) and I could hear other people talking
on other phone lines. And never mind that it was not possible to even use
the phone line. At least not intentionally.


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Default Switching Land Line Phone Companies


"Ulysses" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
...
On Jun 18, 11:43 am, "HeyBub" wrote:
Ulysses wrote:
"RBM" wrote in message
...


"Murriel" wrote in message
...
Is it true that if you switch to a local mom & pop outfit, Verizon
still has to correct infrastructure problems such as static that
emanates from outside the house?


If so, how does this work? Do you complain to your new local phone
provider who then contacts Verizon?


Will Verizon still deliver phone directories to you even though you
have dumped them? Thanks.


You address your complaints directly to the new phone company, they,
in turn contact Verizon to initialize a repair request. The
advantage to this method is that you won't have to hear Verizon
rolling on the floor laughing at you, and in truth, you'll get
service from Verizon, just as soon as ALL of their regular customers
are taken care of, or hell freezes over, whichever comes first. I'd
recommend voip


Hell finally froze over and Verizon fixed my phone line. It only
took seven years. Sounds like it would have taken longer with a mom
and pop company. Mine used to go out whenever it got damp and when it
rained it would make long-distance calls and call 911 repeatedly. I
cancelled my long distance but they wouldn't let me cancel 911. One
time the sheriff showed up in his front-wheel drive cruizer when it
was pouring down rain and I don't know how he even made it down the
dirt road in his car. After many complaints they finally fixed the
911 problem and then it started calling 611 every time it rained. At
95 cents per call it added up quickly. They would not let me cancel
611. Now when it rains I can actually use my dialup service. I
managed to have all the bogus calls removed from my bills with
Verizon. I don't know if it would or would not have been as easy
with another provider. Verizon stinks but it could be worse.


Heh!

I used to get the cops knocking on my door about once a month in

response
to
a 911-hangup. After about a year, the problem was finally traced to a

splice
on the cable. Some do-bads had tapped into our incoming fax line and

were
using it to make local calls (there was no long-distance capability).
Evidently they were trying to call Honduras or Patagonia or somewhere

whose
international calling prefix was +910 and missed.


Apparently this 911 calling due to a bad connection or short is
common. How it manages to get the right dialing combination is quite
amazing. I had it happen to me here in NJ. First, the phone
service was out one morning. Before calling Verizon, I thought I'd
just wait a couple hours and see if it came back. It did. But that
afternoon, the police showed up due to a 911 hangup call. Before
Verizon fixed it later that day, the police showed up again.

First it was 911, then 411. Now, if I could get it do dial 611 then maybe
I'd be getting somewhere. When I complained about the long-distance calls
they told me that if I wasn't making them then someone was tapping into my
phone line--at 3 am in pouring down rain. Right. Never mind that I told
them the wires were crossed (shorted) and I could hear other people

talking
on other phone lines. And never mind that it was not possible to even use
the phone line. At least not intentionally.



I got mixed up up there and said 611 when I meant 411 (Information). 611 is
repair, or used to be. Now it's more like "we are going to put you on hold
for 20 minutes and try to sell you a bunch of services for your phone that
doesn't work instead of connecting you directly to repair."


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