Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
rb rb is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 32
Default tankless hot water

I have a kitchen and 2 bathrooms. Would going from a hot water tank to
"tankless" hot water in each spot be any kind of a good deal? Seems to me
like it wouldn't be good.


  #2   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,199
Default tankless hot water

On Apr 25, 9:35�am, "rb" wrote:
I have a kitchen and 2 bathrooms. �Would going from a hot water tank to
"tankless" hot water in each spot be any kind of a good deal? �Seems to me
like it wouldn't be good.


well the discussion is already underway

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.h...d1881e659304ba
  #3   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,489
Default tankless hot water

On Fri, 25 Apr 2008 08:35:05 -0500, "rb" wrote:

I have a kitchen and 2 bathrooms. Would going from a hot water tank to
"tankless" hot water in each spot be any kind of a good deal? Seems to me
like it wouldn't be good.


You are pressed on space, the tankless is the way to go. Otherwise I
prefer the water heater tank.
  #4   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 655
Default tankless hot water

Stick with the tank. Also, I put in a point of use 10gallon electric next
to the front load washer, cause it's 50 or 60 plumbing feet from the
ho****er. They use so little water, the hot didn't have time to get there.
So i plumbed my hot line into the ten gallon unit next to the washer and it
has instant 140 + degree water. costs next to nothing to run.


steve


"rb" wrote in message
. ..
I have a kitchen and 2 bathrooms. Would going from a hot water tank to
"tankless" hot water in each spot be any kind of a good deal? Seems to me
like it wouldn't be good.



  #5   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,199
Default tankless hot water

if you heat with electric just forget it.

you will need 200 amps just for heating water, and more if you
installed 2 units........

electrical upgrade so expensive its unreal, 5 grand estimate


  #6   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,926
Default tankless hot water

On Apr 25, 8:35*am, "rb" wrote:
I have a kitchen and 2 bathrooms. *Would going from a hot water tank to
"tankless" hot water in each spot be any kind of a good deal? *Seems to me
like it wouldn't be good.


For electric I dought it, if 2 baths are used at the same time it will
take the expensive Ng tankless, one unit. here that can cost you alot
in retrofit.
  #7   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 22,192
Default tankless hot water

On Fri, 25 Apr 2008 08:35:05 -0500, "rb" wrote:

I have a kitchen and 2 bathrooms. Would going from a hot water tank to
"tankless" hot water in each spot be any kind of a good deal? Seems to me
like it wouldn't be good.


You could put a small tank less booster for hot water.Frankly, If I
build a new home it will be a tank less system, zoned and piped for
the gas....

Don't try to retrofit now.
  #8   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
Art Art is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 788
Default tankless hot water

We just replaced a direct vent tank with a tankless. I did it because
replacement direct vents run an unbelievable $1500 with labor and a 6 year
guarantee tank. The tankless should last 15 years at least. It cost $3k.

I had it done by gas company expecting a perfect job. It was perfect....
the second time they did it after I bitched.

Tons of things can go wrong. Gas pipes have to be big enuf. So does meter.
Then the plastic pipes they used had smaller internal diameter than CPVC I
had before. They replaced with copper the second time. Then the exhaust
should be slanted down unless they is a condensation collector. Mine was
pitched up the first time.

After it was reinstalled correctly, I can say it is decent but not as good
as a tank. It is slightly slower. Also my basement is much cooler now in
the winter (an advantage in the summer) but cold water is now much colder
and that makes hot water seem to take a long time to flow.

Overall stick with a tank.



"rb" wrote in message
. ..
I have a kitchen and 2 bathrooms. Would going from a hot water tank to
"tankless" hot water in each spot be any kind of a good deal? Seems to me
like it wouldn't be good.



  #9   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 109
Default tankless hot water

On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 16:53:25 -0400, "Art"
wrote:

We just replaced a direct vent tank with a tankless. I did it because
replacement direct vents run an unbelievable $1500 with labor and a 6 year
guarantee tank. The tankless should last 15 years at least. It cost $3k.

I had it done by gas company expecting a perfect job. It was perfect....
the second time they did it after I bitched.

Tons of things can go wrong. Gas pipes have to be big enuf. So does meter.
Then the plastic pipes they used had smaller internal diameter than CPVC I
had before. They replaced with copper the second time. Then the exhaust
should be slanted down unless they is a condensation collector. Mine was
pitched up the first time.

After it was reinstalled correctly, I can say it is decent but not as good
as a tank. It is slightly slower. Also my basement is much cooler now in
the winter (an advantage in the summer) but cold water is now much colder
and that makes hot water seem to take a long time to flow.

Overall stick with a tank.


For some reason, there is a myth that the "tank" systems are horribly
inefficient and wasteful and that the "instant tankless" systems are
green and more economical in the long run.

For most tankless installations, by the time you get through paying
and solving all the problems, the payback period is going to be a long
way off in the distant future.

Last time I thought about my gas heater tank (I think that it's a
great thing that I don't have to think about it much), the pilot light
has never had to be relit in 10 years. It's like the eternal flame!

In the United States, the "tank" systems are a tried-and-tested
commodity item (in most cases) and can usually be replaced in the same
day at low cost. They last for years and the lifetime can be usuallly
be extended if you take care to flush it and replace the electrode at
periodic intervals.
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tankless hot water heater Remi Home Repair 6 September 21st 07 04:08 AM
Tankless Water Heaters mwlogs Home Repair 12 April 13th 06 01:41 AM
Tankless Water Heater- Jack Home Repair 16 January 24th 06 02:04 AM
tankless water system v. newish water heater cjra Home Repair 13 January 16th 05 05:50 PM
tankless water system v. newish water heater cjra Home Ownership 10 January 11th 05 04:59 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:03 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2023 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"