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Hi,
I have to build a small section of wooden fence. I need to plant two
posts into concrete, I've never done this before. Do they go directly
into the concrete? or do you put some kind of mounting hardware in the
concrete then attach them to that? If they go directly into the
concrete, then how many inches should be underground ? thanks
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On Apr 20, 1:58*pm, dpb wrote:
wrote:
Hi,
I have to build a small section of wooden fence. I need to plant two
posts into concrete, I've never done this before. Do they go directly
into the concrete? or do you put some kind of mounting hardware in the
concrete then attach them to that? If they go directly into the
concrete, then how many inches should be underground ? thanks


Rule of thumb is 1/3rd the post is in the ground so the total post
length is 4-thirds the height of the fence.

Most who do the concrete around the post thing do just dump it in around
the post. *I personally don't much like the "concrete around the post"
way except for a corner post that may really need additional lateral
support and where there isn't ample room for adequate bracing, but
that's me.

One can also simply use quikrete ready-mix to pack the whole and let it
set up w/ ground water as a simple expedient compared to mixing it.
Somewhat easier to retain the position and achieve plumb that way as
don't need bracing while the mix cures.

--


In frosty area 3 feet depth; however 30 inches seems to work here for
fence not over 4 to 5 feet. It will be interesting to see how our
neighbours six footer stands up after a couple of winters; it's a
fairly windy location with gusts to 90 to 100 kilometres per hour and
higher.
If using cement do not fill up to ground level. The cement plug so
formed will get eased/heaved up out of the ground by frost. Thus
raising the post with it.
Put some cement around the foot (and throw in any stones, if you have
them); using pressure treated wood posts and or soaking the bottom of
the post in preservative.
Post will later rot off at ground level; so slope ground surface away
from post hole if you can, to minimize water from pooling around post.
Not only fences; have built several sheds (last 30 years) using same
method.
Also our 20+ year old deck using stubs of old creosote telephone
poles, but not cemented at all, then cutting them off to desired level.
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terry wrote:
On Apr 20, 1:58 pm, dpb wrote:
wrote:
Hi,
I have to build a small section of wooden fence. I need to plant two
posts into concrete, I've never done this before. Do they go directly
into the concrete? or do you put some kind of mounting hardware in the
concrete then attach them to that? If they go directly into the
concrete, then how many inches should be underground ? thanks

Rule of thumb is 1/3rd the post is in the ground so the total post
length is 4-thirds the height of the fence.

Most who do the concrete around the post thing do just dump it in around
the post. I personally don't much like the "concrete around the post"
way except for a corner post that may really need additional lateral
support and where there isn't ample room for adequate bracing, but
that's me.

One can also simply use quikrete ready-mix to pack the whole and let it
set up w/ ground water as a simple expedient compared to mixing it.
Somewhat easier to retain the position and achieve plumb that way as
don't need bracing while the mix cures.

--


In frosty area 3 feet depth; however 30 inches seems to work here for
fence not over 4 to 5 feet. It will be interesting to see how our
neighbours six footer stands up after a couple of winters; it's a
fairly windy location with gusts to 90 to 100 kilometres per hour and
higher.


Yeah, in areas where it's wet enough frost heave might be an issue --
we're plenty cold, but dry and sandy enough heaving is so minimal that
for fences never think about it as an issue --

Don't need to tell me about windy locations, though...those kinds of
gusts are pretty routine here as well--in fact we just spent a full two
days of it last weekend w/ no measurable moisture in the front following
to make up for it (as again is so often the case)

--


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On Apr 20, 11:44 am, wrote:
Hi,
I need to plant two
posts into concrete,


Are you sure they "need" concrete...?

I might use concrete for some reason, I just can't think of one. A
post has to rot, eventually, then there's just a big hunk of concrete
to be frost heaved or a complete PITA when the post needs substitution
or removal.

But I'm no fence expert, just a former farm boy.
-----

- gpsman
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gpsman wrote:
....

But I'm no fence expert, just a former farm boy.


Me too, except former and now returned.

I'm in the process at present of rebuilding sections of the feedlots
which entail replacing a few of the ties.

--
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On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 10:58:19 -0500, dpb wrote:

One can also simply use quikrete ready-mix to pack the whole and let it
set up w/ ground water as a simple expedient compared to mixing it.
Somewhat easier to retain the position and achieve plumb that way as
don't need bracing while the mix cures.


I recently used that to set a mailbox post.
Worked great! Get the post where you want it, pour in the dry mix and
pour water on it.
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"gpsman" wrote in message
...
On Apr 20, 11:44 am, wrote:
Hi,
I need to plant two
posts into concrete,


Are you sure they "need" concrete...?

I might use concrete for some reason, I just can't think of one.


I use quarter minus and a little concrete on top to prevent standing water.
No problems for years, works great. Agree its PITA to remove a big chunk of
concrete, two 80# sacks per hole!




A
post has to rot, eventually, then there's just a big hunk of concrete
to be frost heaved or a complete PITA when the post needs substitution
or removal.

But I'm no fence expert, just a former farm boy.
-----

- gpsman



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