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Default not your typical paint stripper question... please read

Blaine Whether wrote:

I have a project actually requiring the reuse of paint AFTER it has been
stripped with a chemical stripper. The problem I have is that I don't know
how to redissolve the resulting sludge and chips that the stripper produces
back into as close to the original paint as possible. I realize it wouldn't
be perfect, but how can I thin and dissolve the paint stripper sludge?

Thanks,
Blaine




You can add more paint remover to it, but it will NOT be anywhere close
to paint. What on earth
are you doing?
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Default not your typical paint stripper question... please read


"Norminn" wrote in message
m...
Blaine Whether wrote:

I have a project actually requiring the reuse of paint AFTER it has been
stripped with a chemical stripper. The problem I have is that I don't
know how to redissolve the resulting sludge and chips that the stripper
produces back into as close to the original paint as possible. I realize
it wouldn't be perfect, but how can I thin and dissolve the paint stripper
sludge?

Thanks,
Blaine


You can add more paint remover to it, but it will NOT be anywhere close to
paint. What on earth
are you doing?


Not looking for paint, although if I can get somewhat close to that it would
be ok. I just need to dissolve the resulting sludge and chips into a
solution. The thinner, the better. Acetone worked wonders at removing and
dissolving paint in the past, but I am now up against paint that acetone
doesn't dissolve. The paint stripper will do it, but always leaves a sludge
and I need this dissolved too.


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Default not your typical paint stripper question... please read

Norminn wrote:




You can add more paint remover to it, but it will NOT be anywhere
close to paint. What on earth
are you doing?


Trying to save the planet?



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Default not your typical paint stripper question... please read

Since trolls rarely respond to back to a thread, we must assume that you are
serious.

It seems that at one time you removed or softened a finish with acetone and
somehow reused what ever you removed. That finish was most likely lacquer
which I guess you can redisolve and get some sort of useable finish.

OTOH, the stripper that you used really wreaks the paint at a molecular
level. Its full of very nasty stuff that breaks up the polymer bonds
created in the binder. It also contains wax that is used to keep the sludge
from drying out.

So I guess you could distill out the nasty chemicals and then figure out how
to separate out the pigments, re-grind them up really fine, remix in the
proper binders and solvents and then put in what ever other additives are
needed. Its all described here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paint.

Good luck

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"Blaine Whether" wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

"Norminn" wrote in message
m...
Blaine Whether wrote:

I have a project actually requiring the reuse of paint AFTER it has been
stripped with a chemical stripper. The problem I have is that I don't
know how to redissolve the resulting sludge and chips that the stripper
produces back into as close to the original paint as possible. I realize
it wouldn't be perfect, but how can I thin and dissolve the paint
stripper sludge?

Thanks,
Blaine


You can add more paint remover to it, but it will NOT be anywhere close
to paint. What on earth
are you doing?


Not looking for paint, although if I can get somewhat close to that it
would be ok. I just need to dissolve the resulting sludge and chips into
a solution. The thinner, the better. Acetone worked wonders at removing
and dissolving paint in the past, but I am now up against paint that
acetone doesn't dissolve. The paint stripper will do it, but always
leaves a sludge and I need this dissolved too.



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Default not your typical paint stripper question... please read

Blaine Whether wrote:

"Norminn" wrote in message
om...


Blaine Whether wrote:



I have a project actually requiring the reuse of paint AFTER it has been
stripped with a chemical stripper. The problem I have is that I don't
know how to redissolve the resulting sludge and chips that the stripper
produces back into as close to the original paint as possible. I realize
it wouldn't be perfect, but how can I thin and dissolve the paint stripper
sludge?

Thanks,
Blaine




You can add more paint remover to it, but it will NOT be anywhere close to
paint. What on earth
are you doing?



Not looking for paint, although if I can get somewhat close to that it would
be ok. I just need to dissolve the resulting sludge and chips into a
solution. The thinner, the better. Acetone worked wonders at removing and
dissolving paint in the past, but I am now up against paint that acetone
doesn't dissolve. The paint stripper will do it, but always leaves a sludge
and I need this dissolved too.




If you are using a methylene paint remover, you remove the sludge
first. Often takes more than one application,
depending on amount and character of old finish being removed. Nasty
stuff, so you need good ventilation and
protection for other surfaces. With the final application, I use medium
steel wool to scrub the surface, then a
scraper to remove it, a last wipe with s.w. to get as much of the
stripper as possible. I then use fine s.w. and
mineral spirits to scrub off the last of the stripper (for wood or
metal) and a last wipe with paper towel. You
want to be sure to wipe off as much of the waste as possible, including
fine little shreds of steel woo.l. Semi-
paste stripper usually has wax as a thickener and the wax will interfere
with new finish if left on. If you have left
an initial application of stripper on a surface and it has dried, no
problem. Just apply another thick coat, let it
work for ......20-30 minutes or so. Best not to work with it in sun or
wind, as it evaporates too quickly to get
best results.


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Default not your typical paint stripper question... please read

On Apr 20, 8:07*am, "HeyBub" wrote:
Norminn wrote:

You can add more paint remover to it, but it will NOT be anywhere
close to paint. *What on earth
are you doing?


Trying to save the planet?



Sort of like saying I'm trying to figure out a good seal to put around
my head after I stick it into a groundhog hole, without saying what
the overall objective is. Which says troll to me.
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