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al al is offline
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Default I don't want a pool

I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.
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Default I don't want a pool

al wrote:
I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


I'd recommend finding a different house, frankly.

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Default I don't want a pool

On Apr 9, 4:25 pm, dpb wrote:
al wrote:
I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


I'd recommend finding a different house, frankly.


No ****. Why pay an extra $20K+ to earn a $5K job that will reduce
the value of the property $20K+?

http://www.cafepress.com/buy/thinkin...?CMP=KNC-F-ALL
-----

- gpsman
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Default I don't want a pool


"al" wrote in message
...
I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


You're paying taxes on the pool. you will probably need to get a permit to
demo it,and there may be some specifics as to how the town wants it done.
Then it gets removed from the survey and the tax role


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Default I don't want a pool

On Apr 9, 5:57*pm, "RBM" wrote:
"al" wrote in message

...

I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. *If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? *Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


You're paying taxes on the pool. you will probably need to get a permit to
demo it,and there may be some specifics as to how the town wants it done.
Then it gets removed from the survey and the tax role


I don't know why people jump to the conclusion that a pool
automatically means the house is going to cost $20K more. In most of
the USA, particularly northern climates, when you add a pool, you may
not get anything back when you sell it. Or, in some cases, it can
actually hinder the sale. For example, families with small children
may be reluctant to buy it.

If you're satisfied with the house and price, the pool certainly can
be removed. If the pool has a concrete deck around it, I would demo
that. For the pool itself, I'd get rid of just the top foot, punch
holes in the bottom, then use clean fill, followed by topsoil.


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Default I don't want a pool

On Wed, 09 Apr 2008 15:25:32 -0500, dpb wrote:

al wrote:
I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


I'd recommend finding a different house, frankly.


I second that. Why pay extra in the first place for a chemical dump site
with human waste and then have to relandscape the yard.

It's a buyer market like it hasn't been in years if you have good credit!

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Default I don't want a pool

On Apr 9, 6:19 pm, wrote:
I don't know why people jump to the conclusion that a pool
automatically means the house is going to cost $20K more. In most of
the USA, particularly northern climates, when you add a pool, you may
not get anything back when you sell it. Or, in some cases, it can
actually hinder the sale. For example, families with small children
may be reluctant to buy it.

If you're satisfied with the house and price, the pool certainly can
be removed. If the pool has a concrete deck around it, I would demo
that. For the pool itself, I'd get rid of just the top foot, punch
holes in the bottom, then use clean fill, followed by topsoil.


Thanks.

Actually both houses are bank owned and selling at substantial
discounts to comparable properties, without pools, in their respective
areas.

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Default I don't want a pool

al wrote:
I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


I was taught that a pool adds zero value to a house, i.e. adding or
removing a pool has zero effect on home value. It will cost a few bucks
to fill it in and we're in a buyers market so include this cost in your
offer. But, since it is a strong buyers market, find a house without a
pool.
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Default I don't want a pool

On Apr 9, 6:58�pm, Frank [email protected] wrote:
al wrote:
I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. �If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? �Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


I was taught that a pool adds zero value to a house, i.e. adding or
removing a pool has zero effect on home value. �It will cost a few bucks
to fill it in and we're in a buyers market so include this cost in your
offer. �But, since it is a strong buyers market, find a house without a
pool.


whats done is create large hole in pool bottom, and demo around edge
and fill in.

if you might want to reactivate it someday still hole in bottom then
fill with gravel.

you dont want abandoned pool holding water and breeding mosquitoes.

call some local pool companies they remove them too.........
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Default I don't want a pool

al wrote:
I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


Drain pool. Remove and sell the pump and diving board and such, if they
are in good shape. Remove liner and metal side panels, if a modern cheap
pool, or punch holes in bottom, if an old-style gunnite pool (so it
won't float out of ground in wet weather, like a boat). Bust up
surrounding concrete and edging, and drop in hole, keeping top 18" or so
clear. Top off with clean topsoil, grade and seed to suit.

Don't just fill it in- that looks tacky. I have seen a couple like that
around town here, both used as garden space, and it still looks like a
pool. And see above about them popping out of the ground- that can
happen even full of dirt, or the reverse can happen- you will have a
small swamp with no way to drain it.

--
aem sends...


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Default I don't want a pool

On Wed, 9 Apr 2008 13:18:00 -0700 (PDT), al
wrote:

I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


The best way is not to buy the house or have the owner remove it
before closing.
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Default I don't want a pool

get the pool . if you like the house and can affod it get on with a
pool

On Apr 9, 7:14*pm, Phisherman wrote:
On Wed, 9 Apr 2008 13:18:00 -0700 (PDT), al
wrote:

I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. *If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? *Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


The best way is not to buy the house or have the owner remove it
before closing. *


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Default I don't want a pool

If it were me, I'd demolish it in it's entirety, then have the remains
hauled away, and pick up some fill dirt (check Craigslist for some,
it's often being given away). When I'm done it would be like it's
never been there.
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Default I don't want a pool

Geeze, You'd think a pool was the equivalent to a stockpile of radioactive
waste. You wouldn't be the first person to buy a house and remove an
existing pool.

If it is vinyl and in good shape it can actually be taken apart and reused.
Try local pool installers to see if they want it for free in exchange for
removing it.


"dpb" wrote in message ...
al wrote:
I've been looking for a new house and a couple that I've liked have
pools. If I got one of those houses and wanted to get rid of the
pool, what would be the best way to do that? Just fill it in or
demolish it then fill.


I'd recommend finding a different house, frankly.

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Default I don't want a pool

Jeff wrote:
Geeze, You'd think a pool was the equivalent to a stockpile of radioactive
waste. You wouldn't be the first person to buy a house and remove an
existing pool.

....

I'd see little point in the market today to spend the money required --
I was assuming it would be an inground pool or the question wouldn't
even have been raised.

It would be at least a moderate expense to remove and re-landscape,
etc., so unless there's a really big financial incentive, seems like
there would be better choices available is my thought.

Plus, if it is in a neighborhood where pools are a common amenity, would
likely be a detracting value item if were to want/need to relocate in
the future.

So, overall, still my inclination would be to look elsewhere or at least
get a pretty solid estimate on the cost and the potential change in
final value before going on.

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