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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

Hello,

I'm planning to do a 25' run of 2" cast iron pipe between floor joists
and am thinking about how to properly support it. There are pipe
hangers that I could use to support it from above, so I would have to
attach these to the subfloor. I was wondering if instead there is a
type of support I could use that would attach to the joists on either
side. Something like the expandable bar support on a fan-rated
ceiling electrical box. Any suggestions or pointers?

Thanks, Wayne
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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

Wayne Whitney wrote:
Hello,

I'm planning to do a 25' run of 2" cast iron pipe between floor joists
and am thinking about how to properly support it. There are pipe
hangers that I could use to support it from above, so I would have to
attach these to the subfloor. I was wondering if instead there is a
type of support I could use that would attach to the joists on either
side. Something like the expandable bar support on a fan-rated
ceiling electrical box. Any suggestions or pointers?


Just plumbers' tape (the perforated metal strapping) would work fine as
long as use adequate fasteners.

But, one has to ask why, in this day and age one would use cast iron?

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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

On Apr 9, 2:42*pm, dpb wrote:
Wayne Whitney wrote:
Hello,


I'm planning to do a 25' run of 2" cast iron pipe between floor joists
and am thinking about how to properly support it. *There are pipe
hangers that I could use to support it from above, so I would have to
attach these to the subfloor. *I was wondering if instead there is a
type of support I could use that would attach to the joists on either
side. *Something like the expandable bar support on a fan-rated
ceiling electrical box. *Any suggestions or pointers?


Just plumbers' tape (the perforated metal strapping) would work fine as
long as use adequate fasteners.

But, one has to ask why, in this day and age one would use cast iron?

--


Or even 2 1/2" or 3" conduit C clamps and clamp them to the side of
one joist
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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

On 2008-04-09, dpb wrote:

Just plumbers' tape (the perforated metal strapping) would work fine
as long as use adequate fasteners.


Yeah, I thought of plumber's tape, but I was looking for something
more rigid. An expandable bar would work great.

But, one has to ask why, in this day and age one would use cast
iron?


Cast iron is quieter and I may wish to finish my basement.

Wayne
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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

Wayne Whitney wrote:
Hello,

I'm planning to do a 25' run of 2" cast iron pipe between floor joists
and am thinking about how to properly support it. There are pipe
hangers that I could use to support it from above, so I would have to
attach these to the subfloor. I was wondering if instead there is a
type of support I could use that would attach to the joists on either
side. Something like the expandable bar support on a fan-rated
ceiling electrical box. Any suggestions or pointers?

Thanks, Wayne



Surely not cast iron. Galv steel pipe?

One has to ask, why not PVC?

Have you considered the slope of the pipe?
Over a 25' run, the pitch will eat up 6" of the joist depth.
Add the pipe O.D. to that......

More details. Exactly what are you attempting?

Jim


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On 2008-04-09, Mikepier wrote:

Or even 2 1/2" or 3" conduit C clamps and clamp them to the side of
one joist


That would work except I need to traverse from one side of the joist
cavity to the other side over the course of this 25' root. So I could
do that at the ends, but I still need a solution for the middle two
supports.

Thanks, Wayne

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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

Wayne Whitney wrote:
Hello,

I'm planning to do a 25' run of 2" cast iron pipe between floor joists
and am thinking about how to properly support it. There are pipe
hangers that I could use to support it from above, so I would have to
attach these to the subfloor. I was wondering if instead there is a
type of support I could use that would attach to the joists on either
side. Something like the expandable bar support on a fan-rated
ceiling electrical box. Any suggestions or pointers?

Thanks, Wayne


I think they are called riser clamps. A real plumbing store will have them.
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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

Wayne Whitney wrote:
On 2008-04-09, dpb wrote:

Just plumbers' tape (the perforated metal strapping) would work fine
as long as use adequate fasteners.


Yeah, I thought of plumber's tape, but I was looking for something
more rigid. An expandable bar would work great.


Well you could either rig up something or use the expanding light mounts
or similar and I suspect (although I've not searched extensively)
there's something very similar for plumbing supports as well available.

But, the plumbers tape will probably just as simple and since it is
flexible will undoubtedly be be more quiet. Rigid w/o a a cushion
somewhere -- vibration/noise.

But, one has to ask why, in this day and age one would use cast
iron?


Cast iron is quieter and I may wish to finish my basement.


I'd go for the PVC for DWV and insulate around it w/ solid foam or
similar for the sound retardation, meself...

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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

On 2008-04-09, Speedy Jim wrote:

Surely not cast iron. Galv steel pipe?


Yes, cast iron.

One has to ask, why not PVC?


Cast iron is quieter and this is above a basement that I may wish to
finish in the future.

Have you considered the slope of the pipe? Over a 25' run, the
pitch will eat up 6" of the joist depth. Add the pipe O.D. to
that......


Yes, indeed, it just works. The pipe OD is 2.5" and the fall is
6.25", which makes 8.75". I have old 2x10 joists which are 9.5" deep.
So it all fits. I will need to make a larger than usual hole in the
subfloor to accomodate the long turn 90 at the upper end.

Mostly I'm just looking for an expandable bar support, I'd prefer that
over plumber's tape.

Cheers, Wayne
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On 2008-04-09, George wrote:

I think they are called riser clamps. A real plumbing store will
have them.


Hmm, riser clamps are designed to rest on the subfloor or bottom
plate. So I'd have to nail some blocking onto the side of each joist
to give the clamp legs something to rest on. Plus with a horiztonal
run, the clamp legs would be flat, so they'd be loaded in their weak
direction. Seems like a bit of trouble butdoable, probably sturdier
than plumber's tape. This would be a good option if I can find some
extendable bar supports.

Thanks, Wayne



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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

On 2008-04-09, dpb wrote:

But, the plumbers tape will probably just as simple and since it is
flexible will undoubtedly be be more quiet. Rigid w/o a a cushion
somewhere -- vibration/noise.


The noise concern is from flowing waste water through the pipe, I
don't think there's going to be much vibration from that. But
flexibility still seems like a good idea, so maybe I should just use
the plumber's tape. I guess if it seems too flimsy I can always
support it more often. Thanks.

Cheers, Wayne
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Wayne Whitney wrote:
On 2008-04-09, George wrote:

I think they are called riser clamps. A real plumbing store will
have them.


Hmm, riser clamps are designed to rest on the subfloor or bottom
plate. ...


There are a myriad of hangers available -- see the following link for
some styles...your local plumbing supply is bound to have or be able to
get whatever you want...

http://www.nibco.com/cms.do?id=2&pId=19

I'd _still_ go w/ the tape, even if I used it to simply fashion the hook
....

imo, $0.02, etc., etc., etc., ...

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Wayne Whitney wrote:
On 2008-04-09, dpb wrote:

But, the plumbers tape will probably just as simple and since it is
flexible will undoubtedly be be more quiet. Rigid w/o a a cushion
somewhere -- vibration/noise.


The noise concern is from flowing waste water through the pipe, I
don't think there's going to be much vibration from that. But
flexibility still seems like a good idea, so maybe I should just use
the plumber's tape. I guess if it seems too flimsy I can always
support it more often. Thanks.


I ken, but there's also the thermal expansion/contraction which while
not _as_ significant w/ cast as plastic is a potential if the mount is
rigid against the hanger. Different noise, surely.

See my other posting on possible hangers if you really decide to go that
route, but my guess would be if you get it in place w/ the tape it will
be every bit as stout as you could wish, particularly if you on occasion
wrap it 360 around rather than just support it from underneath.

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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe


"Wayne Whitney" wrote in message
...
Hello,

I'm planning to do a 25' run of 2" cast iron pipe between floor joists
and am thinking about how to properly support it. There are pipe
hangers that I could use to support it from above, so I would have to
attach these to the subfloor. I was wondering if instead there is a
type of support I could use that would attach to the joists on either
side. Something like the expandable bar support on a fan-rated
ceiling electrical box. Any suggestions or pointers?


Why not just cut 2x4 and nail it under the pipe between the joists? At the low
end, nail it above the pipe and nail on strapping under the pipe.


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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

On 2008-04-09, dpb wrote:

I ken, but there's also the thermal expansion/contraction which while
not _as_ significant w/ cast as plastic is a potential if the mount is
rigid against the hanger. Different noise, surely.


Another good point. I'll go with the plumber's tape. Thanks for the
help.

Yours, Wayne


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Bob F wrote:
....

Why not just cut 2x4 and nail it under the pipe between the joists? At the low
end, nail it above the pipe and nail on strapping under the pipe.


I know, I know!!! --make N 2x6 (8?, I forget what Wayne said joists
were) blocking to fit between and lay out the rise and lateral shift
along the run and drill. Slide on, lift into place and nail! V,VBG

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Wayne Whitney wrote:
On 2008-04-09, dpb wrote:

I ken, but there's also the thermal expansion/contraction which while
not _as_ significant w/ cast as plastic is a potential if the mount is
rigid against the hanger. Different noise, surely.


Another good point. I'll go with the plumber's tape. Thanks for the
help.


No problem...as you may have guessed, I've done very similar before...

One more note on the solidity of the mounting since that seems to be
your concern--I earlier wrote

"... get it in place w/ the tape it will be every bit as stout as you
could wish, particularly if you on occasion wrap it 360 around rather
than just support it from underneath."

I'll note that since you have access to the joists, one way to
accomplish this is to occasionally where you wrap the tape around to
fasten one end solidly, then use a lag or even a bolt through the other
end and use that to tension the tape--it'll make a solid mount that
still has a little flex. Even though the tape is tightly wound against
the pipe, that it isn't rigid means it will move slightly w/ the pipe
instead of any inclination of there to be a noise problem w/ a more
solid mount.

HTH...

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Default Supporting Cast Iron DWV Pipe

why not just run pvc?

s


"Wayne Whitney" wrote in message
...
Hello,

I'm planning to do a 25' run of 2" cast iron pipe between floor joists
and am thinking about how to properly support it. There are pipe
hangers that I could use to support it from above, so I would have to
attach these to the subfloor. I was wondering if instead there is a
type of support I could use that would attach to the joists on either
side. Something like the expandable bar support on a fan-rated
ceiling electrical box. Any suggestions or pointers?

Thanks, Wayne



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dpb wrote:
....
I'll note that since you have access to the joists, one way to
accomplish this is to occasionally where you wrap the tape around to
fasten one end solidly, then use a lag or even a bolt through the other
end and use that to tension the tape--it'll make a solid mount that
still has a little flex. ...


OK, since I've gone this far, I'll throw out another option I've used
that's simple and effective (albeit not usual for interior plumbing, but
what the hey... ).

Two wraps of #10 malleable wire (heavy fence wire works, well) fastened
solidly to the joists and then just tension w/ a twist. Will work
better in this case if the pipe is offset closer to one side so have a
little longer span for the twist, but this "trick" is useful for all
kinds of problems...

--
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Ok, lets suppose you finish the basement. What in the world could possibly
happen if some water flowing through a 2" pipe was heard? This seems like
such a waste of time and energy.

s


"Wayne Whitney" wrote in message
...
On 2008-04-09, Speedy Jim wrote:

Surely not cast iron. Galv steel pipe?


Yes, cast iron.

One has to ask, why not PVC?


Cast iron is quieter and this is above a basement that I may wish to
finish in the future.

Have you considered the slope of the pipe? Over a 25' run, the
pitch will eat up 6" of the joist depth. Add the pipe O.D. to
that......


Yes, indeed, it just works. The pipe OD is 2.5" and the fall is
6.25", which makes 8.75". I have old 2x10 joists which are 9.5" deep.
So it all fits. I will need to make a larger than usual hole in the
subfloor to accomodate the long turn 90 at the upper end.

Mostly I'm just looking for an expandable bar support, I'd prefer that
over plumber's tape.

Cheers, Wayne





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On 2008-04-09, dpb wrote:

I know, I know!!! --make N 2x6 (8?, I forget what Wayne said joists
were) blocking to fit between and lay out the rise and lateral shift
along the run and drill. Slide on, lift into place and nail!
V,VBG


You know, now that you mention it I need to have blocking in between
the joists in at least 2 places anyway. So I may actually just do
that! Joists are 2x10.

Cheers, Wayne

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"S. Barker" wrote in message
...
Ok, lets suppose you finish the basement. What in the world could possibly
happen if some water flowing through a 2" pipe was heard? This seems like
such a waste of time and energy.


After living in a house with quiet cast iron drains, drain noise at others
houses with plastic drains just seems obnoxious and tacky.


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Oh, please.


s


"Bob F" wrote in message
...

"S. Barker" wrote in message
...
Ok, lets suppose you finish the basement. What in the world could
possibly happen if some water flowing through a 2" pipe was heard? This
seems like such a waste of time and energy.


After living in a house with quiet cast iron drains, drain noise at others
houses with plastic drains just seems obnoxious and tacky.



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If you enjoy hearing every flush go by, more power for you.
I'll pass.

"S. Barker" wrote in message
...
Oh, please.


s


"Bob F" wrote in message
...

"S. Barker" wrote in message
...
Ok, lets suppose you finish the basement. What in the world could possibly
happen if some water flowing through a 2" pipe was heard? This seems like
such a waste of time and energy.


After living in a house with quiet cast iron drains, drain noise at others
houses with plastic drains just seems obnoxious and tacky.





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On Apr 9, 5:38*pm, Wayne Whitney wrote:
On 2008-04-09, dpb wrote:

I know, I know!!! *--make N 2x6 (8?, I forget what Wayne said joists
were) blocking to fit between and lay out the rise and lateral shift
along the run and drill. *Slide on, lift into place and nail!
V,VBG


You know, now that you mention it I need to have blocking in between
the joists in at least 2 places anyway. *So I may actually just do
that! *Joists are 2x10.

Cheers, Wayne


While I can see your point about the noise (it isn't that much more),
I keep wondering just how many cast iron joints you have done. The
job is not 'simple' and takes a few special tools. Even done by
professionals doesn't gaurantee a leak proof joint over the course of
years.

Harry K


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On 2008-04-10, Harry K wrote:

While I can see your point about the noise (it isn't that much more),
I keep wondering just how many cast iron joints you have done.


Precisely zero. But modern cast iron is no-hub, I'm pretty sure it is
just like using Mission rubber couplers to join dissimilar pipes, and
I'm plenty familiar with that.

Cheers, Wayne

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Wayne Whitney wrote:
On 2008-04-10, Harry K wrote:


While I can see your point about the noise (it isn't that much more),
I keep wondering just how many cast iron joints you have done.



Precisely zero. But modern cast iron is no-hub, I'm pretty sure it is
just like using Mission rubber couplers to join dissimilar pipes, and
I'm plenty familiar with that.

Cheers, Wayne



You have done your homework :-)

Fernco has a .pdf on the No-Hub coupling series he
http://www.fernco.com/docs/NoHub_Flyer.pdf

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"Wayne Whitney" wrote in message
...
On 2008-04-10, Harry K wrote:

While I can see your point about the noise (it isn't that much more),
I keep wondering just how many cast iron joints you have done.


Precisely zero. But modern cast iron is no-hub, I'm pretty sure it is
just like using Mission rubber couplers to join dissimilar pipes, and
I'm plenty familiar with that.

Cheers, Wayne


Correct. We just had some cast iron installed at work. Code does not allow
for plastic in commercial/industrial facilities and it was all put together
with Fernco parts.


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On Apr 9, 7:59�pm, "S. Barker" wrote:
Ok, lets suppose you finish the basement. �What in the world could possibly
happen if some water flowing through a 2" pipe was heard? �This seems like
such a waste of time and energy.

s

"Wayne Whitney" wrote in message

...



On 2008-04-09, Speedy Jim wrote:


Surely not cast iron. Galv steel pipe?


Yes, cast iron.


One has to ask, why not PVC?


Cast iron is quieter and this is above a basement that I may wish to
finish in the future.


Have you considered the slope of the pipe? �Over a 25' run, the
pitch will eat up 6" of the joist depth. �Add the pipe O.D. to
that......


Yes, indeed, it just works. �The pipe OD is 2.5" and the fall is
6.25", which makes 8.75". �I have old 2x10 joists which are 9.5" deep.
So it all fits. �I will need to make a larger than usual hole in the
subfloor to accomodate the long turn 90 at the upper end.


Mostly I'm just looking for an expandable bar support, I'd prefer that
over plumber's tape.


Cheers, Wayne- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


obviously you dont know how noisey PVC pipe is
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