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Default Replacing Air Handler (partially myself) - How to disconnect refrigerantlines?

Hello,

I need to replace my air handler (the evaporator coil is leaking), and
would like to do as much of it myself as possible. If it weren't for
the refrigerant, I believe I could handle removing the old unit and
putting the new one in, including the sheet metal (yes, I understand
that the sizes won't match up exactly - the new one is about 3.5 inches
taller). Ideally, a contractor would then come in and handle hooking up
the refrigerant lines, and any other leftover cleanup work.

The problem, though (as far as I can tell, anyway), is disconnecting the
refrigerant lines from the old unit.

EPA and legal issues aside, is there a safe and simple way for me to
disconnect the refrigerant lines from the old unit?

I can't find a local contractor to do it for under $150. And then I
have another service charge to hook the lines back up...so, that's why I
would like to do the disconnect myself, if possible.

FYI, judging from past refrigerant refills, the system is probably about
half empty or more at this point (the capacity, I believe, is 7 or 8
pounds of R22. The heat pump is a Payne 3.5 ton 10 SEER.)

Btw, the old air handler is a 10 SEER 4 ton Bryant. The new one (as
suggested by Alpine Air) is a 13 SEER 3 to 3.5 ton Goodman, with a TXV.)

Thanks for any help...

Mike
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Default Replacing Air Handler (partially myself) - How to disconnectrefrigerant lines?

On Apr 9, 12:32*am, Question wrote:
Hello,

I need to replace my air handler (the evaporator coil is leaking), and
would like to do as much of it myself as possible. *If it weren't for
the refrigerant, I believe I could handle removing the old unit and
putting the new one in, including the sheet metal (yes, I understand
that the sizes won't match up exactly - the new one is about 3.5 inches
taller). *Ideally, a contractor would then come in and handle hooking up
the refrigerant lines, and any other leftover cleanup work.

The problem, though (as far as I can tell, anyway), is disconnecting the
refrigerant lines from the old unit.

EPA and legal issues aside, is there a safe and simple way for me to
disconnect the refrigerant lines from the old unit?


Let me get this straight. The obvious issue here is that by law, the
freon must be recovered and not released into the atmosphere. The
rest of us follow the laws and pay the resulting higher prices. And
you want to know how to ignore the law and environment and save
$150? Do you pour your waste oil down the storm sewer too?




I can't find a local contractor to do it for under $150. *And then I
have another service charge to hook the lines back up...so, that's why I
would like to do the disconnect myself, if possible.

FYI, judging from past refrigerant refills, the system is probably about
half empty or more at this point (the capacity, I believe, is 7 or 8
pounds of R22. *The heat pump is a Payne 3.5 ton 10 SEER.)

Btw, the old air handler is a 10 SEER 4 ton Bryant. *The new one (as
suggested by Alpine Air) is a 13 SEER 3 to 3.5 ton Goodman, with a TXV.)

Thanks for any help...

Mike


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Default Replacing Air Handler (partially myself) - How to disconnect refrigerant lines?

"Bubba" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 09 Apr 2008 00:32:26 -0400, Question
wrote:

Hello,

I need to replace my air handler (the evaporator coil is leaking), and
would like to do as much of it myself as possible. If it weren't for
the refrigerant, I believe I could handle removing the old unit and
putting the new one in, including the sheet metal (yes, I understand
that the sizes won't match up exactly - the new one is about 3.5 inches
taller). Ideally, a contractor would then come in and handle hooking up
the refrigerant lines, and any other leftover cleanup work.

The problem, though (as far as I can tell, anyway), is disconnecting the
refrigerant lines from the old unit.

EPA and legal issues aside, is there a safe and simple way for me to
disconnect the refrigerant lines from the old unit?


Yep. Call someone that can do it safely and simply.

I can't find a local contractor to do it for under $150.


Hmmmm. They all charge at least $150? Doest that begin to tell you
something?
Id like to be paying under $1.00 for a gallon of gas but it doesnt
look like Im going to get my way either.
If you "vent" the refrigerant AND get caught, you can be fined up to
$20,000 and the one that turns you in will be rewarded
financially..........just the same as we hvac guys.
I wish I knew where you lived. Id bring my video camera.

And then I
have another service charge to hook the lines back up...so, that's why I
would like to do the disconnect myself, if possible.

Whaa, Whaa, Whaa. Would you like a little cheese with your whine?

FYI, judging from past refrigerant refills, the system is probably about
half empty or more at this point (the capacity, I believe, is 7 or 8
pounds of R22. The heat pump is a Payne 3.5 ton 10 SEER.)


Oh, so if it only has part of its refrigerant left, its ok to ignore
the EPA laws and just vent it and destroy the atmosphere?
Nice call, SMUCK!

Btw, the old air handler is a 10 SEER 4 ton Bryant. The new one (as
suggested by Alpine Air) is a 13 SEER 3 to 3.5 ton Goodman, with a TXV.)

Alpine Air......hahahahahaha. I hope they sent you a jar of Vaseline
with your order.
Bubba

Thanks for any help...

Mike



Why don't you just answer the guy's question, dude. Did you not forget that
this is a DIY site?

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Default Replacing Air Handler (partially myself) - How to disconnectrefrigerant lines?

On Apr 9, 10:05�am, "John" wrote:
"Bubba" wrote in message

...





On Wed, 09 Apr 2008 00:32:26 -0400, Question
wrote:


Hello,


I need to replace my air handler (the evaporator coil is leaking), and
would like to do as much of it myself as possible. �If it weren't for
the refrigerant, I believe I could handle removing the old unit and
putting the new one in, including the sheet metal (yes, I understand
that the sizes won't match up exactly - the new one is about 3.5 inches
taller). �Ideally, a contractor would then come in and handle hooking up
the refrigerant lines, and any other leftover cleanup work.


The problem, though (as far as I can tell, anyway), is disconnecting the
refrigerant lines from the old unit.


EPA and legal issues aside, is there a safe and simple way for me to
disconnect the refrigerant lines from the old unit?


Yep. Call someone that can do it safely and simply.


I can't find a local contractor to do it for under $150.


Hmmmm. They all charge at least $150? Doest that begin to tell you
something?
Id like to be paying under $1.00 for a gallon of gas but it doesnt
look like Im going to get my way either.
If you "vent" the refrigerant AND get caught, you can be fined up to
$20,000 and the one that turns you in will be rewarded
financially..........just the same as we hvac guys.
I wish I knew where you lived. Id bring my video camera.


And then I
have another service charge to hook the lines back up...so, that's why I
would like to do the disconnect myself, if possible.


Whaa, Whaa, Whaa. Would you like a little cheese with your whine?


FYI, judging from past refrigerant refills, the system is probably about
half empty or more at this point (the capacity, I believe, is 7 or 8
pounds of R22. �The heat pump is a Payne 3.5 ton 10 SEER.)


Oh, so if it only has part of its refrigerant left, its ok to ignore
the EPA laws and just vent it and destroy the atmosphere?
Nice call, SMUCK!


Btw, the old air handler is a 10 SEER 4 ton Bryant. �The new one (as
suggested by Alpine Air) is a 13 SEER 3 to 3.5 ton Goodman, with a TXV.)


Alpine Air......hahahahahaha. I hope they sent you a jar of Vaseline
with your order.
Bubba


Thanks for any help...


Mike


Why don't you just answer the guy's question, dude. �Did you not forget that
this is a DIY site?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


you open the line with the area ventilated, then claim all the gas had
already leaked out........

installing a new A coil are you installing a new outdoor compressor
too?

your better off with new lines they may be sized differently and even
if they arent debris sludge etc might be trapped in old lines and
damage your new set up.

new units save money SEER much improved
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Default Replacing Air Handler (partially myself) - How to disconnectrefrigerant lines?

On Apr 9, 10:05*am, "John" wrote:
"Bubba" wrote in message

...





On Wed, 09 Apr 2008 00:32:26 -0400, Question
wrote:


Hello,


I need to replace my air handler (the evaporator coil is leaking), and
would like to do as much of it myself as possible. *If it weren't for
the refrigerant, I believe I could handle removing the old unit and
putting the new one in, including the sheet metal (yes, I understand
that the sizes won't match up exactly - the new one is about 3.5 inches
taller). *Ideally, a contractor would then come in and handle hooking up
the refrigerant lines, and any other leftover cleanup work.


The problem, though (as far as I can tell, anyway), is disconnecting the
refrigerant lines from the old unit.


EPA and legal issues aside, is there a safe and simple way for me to
disconnect the refrigerant lines from the old unit?


Yep. Call someone that can do it safely and simply.


I can't find a local contractor to do it for under $150.


Hmmmm. They all charge at least $150? Doest that begin to tell you
something?
Id like to be paying under $1.00 for a gallon of gas but it doesnt
look like Im going to get my way either.
If you "vent" the refrigerant AND get caught, you can be fined up to
$20,000 and the one that turns you in will be rewarded
financially..........just the same as we hvac guys.
I wish I knew where you lived. Id bring my video camera.


And then I
have another service charge to hook the lines back up...so, that's why I
would like to do the disconnect myself, if possible.


Whaa, Whaa, Whaa. Would you like a little cheese with your whine?


FYI, judging from past refrigerant refills, the system is probably about
half empty or more at this point (the capacity, I believe, is 7 or 8
pounds of R22. *The heat pump is a Payne 3.5 ton 10 SEER.)


Oh, so if it only has part of its refrigerant left, its ok to ignore
the EPA laws and just vent it and destroy the atmosphere?
Nice call, SMUCK!


Btw, the old air handler is a 10 SEER 4 ton Bryant. *The new one (as
suggested by Alpine Air) is a 13 SEER 3 to 3.5 ton Goodman, with a TXV.)


Alpine Air......hahahahahaha. I hope they sent you a jar of Vaseline
with your order.
Bubba


Thanks for any help...


Mike


Why don't you just answer the guy's question, dude. *Did you not forget that
this is a DIY site?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


He did answer the guy's question. Unless you have the proper
equipment and the training to recover the freon, venting it into the
atmosphere is illegal. Or do you think you can just put the freon
into a bucket? What do you think the eqpt would cost for this one
time event, versus just paying the pro $150, which is what was quoted?

Dumb ass.
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