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Default Gorilla Tape

"SteveB" wrote in news:nkhtc5-bd72.ln1
@news.infowest.com:

Any good?

Steve




You actually have a gorilla to tape up?
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"SteveB" wrote in
:


"Red Green" wrote in message
...
"SteveB" wrote in news:nkhtc5-bd72.ln1
@news.infowest.com:

Any good?

Steve




You actually have a gorilla to tape up?


For fun, I actually prefer double face carpet tape. Avoid areas with
hair unless you like a lot of screaming. Yer welcome. Have fun.

Steve



Around here in Ft Bragg they tape up the "new guys" as a welcome. That
tape is sticky. Probably cost us more than you wanna spend.
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On Tue, 08 Apr 2008 21:04:52 -0500, Red Green
wrote:

"SteveB" wrote in news:nkhtc5-bd72.ln1
:

Any good?

Steve




You actually have a gorilla to tape up?


You have to tape up the gorilla before you take a blood sample.
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Default Gorilla Tape

Any good?

Steve


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"Red Green" wrote in message
...
"SteveB" wrote in news:nkhtc5-bd72.ln1
@news.infowest.com:

Any good?

Steve




You actually have a gorilla to tape up?


For fun, I actually prefer double face carpet tape. Avoid areas with hair
unless you like a lot of screaming. Yer welcome. Have fun.

Steve




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Default Gorilla Tape


"Red Green" wrote in message
...
"SteveB" wrote in
:


"Red Green" wrote in message
...
"SteveB" wrote in news:nkhtc5-bd72.ln1
@news.infowest.com:

Any good?

Steve




You actually have a gorilla to tape up?


For fun, I actually prefer double face carpet tape. Avoid areas with
hair unless you like a lot of screaming. Yer welcome. Have fun.

Steve



Around here in Ft Bragg they tape up the "new guys" as a welcome. That
tape is sticky. Probably cost us more than you wanna spend.


Gorilla tape or double face? I worked conventions for years and years.
Double face was available for the taking, and copious amounts were thrown
away. Now that I don't work there any more, I am finding out what it really
costs.

What I miss most is "gaffer tape." I taped down electrical extensions in my
garage that are five years old now, and look new. Don't know what that
stuff is, but it is GOOD. Didn't get a lot of it, as the stagehands were
pretty picky about the stuff. I can see why. Good ****.

I also miss the copious amounts of 2" clear tape that was left laying
around. When we cleared the floor, it was sinful the stuff we just piled up
to go to the dumpsters. In the old days, we could take a lot of stuff. At
the end, you weren't supposed to take anything that wouldn't fit in your
lunch box. If you had some juice, though, you could get some bigger
"stuff". Carpet pieces, parts of displays, items exhibitors had sold to
you, etc. Like anywhere, it was who you knew.

Steve


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Default Gorilla Tape

"SteveB" wrote in message
...
Any good?

Steve



Good question. I don't know if Gorilla Tape is any good.

When I have something where I need tape that really, really sticks good and
will last a long time, I use the aluminum duct tape that the A/C guys use to
tape up ducts. Since the tape goes on the outside of the duct and the air
pressure is outward, it has gotta stick good. And it does. I bought a
large roll of it for about $12 about ten years ago and I still have a lot
left.


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On Apr 8, 7:04 pm, Red Green wrote:
"SteveB" wrote in news:nkhtc5-bd72.ln1
@news.infowest.com:

Any good?


Steve


You actually have a gorilla to tape up?


May be he is tired of him getting up on things & wants to tape him
down not up.
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SteveB wrote:
Any good?


For what purpose?

I've never bought any but I'd have no reason to think it any better than
any other decent-quality tape of the same general price and purpose.
Certainly the Gorilla-brand poly glue is no different despite the name
and advertising than any of the others.

--
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On Apr 9, 3:29*pm, wrote:
On Tue, 8 Apr 2008 21:03:28 -0800, "SteveB"





wrote:

"Red Green" wrote in message
...
"SteveB" wrote in
:


"Red Green" wrote in message
...
"SteveB" wrote in news:nkhtc5-bd72.ln1
@news.infowest.com:


Any good?


Steve


You actually have a gorilla to tape up?


For fun, I actually prefer double face carpet tape. *Avoid areas with
hair unless you like a lot of screaming. *Yer welcome. *Have fun.


Steve


Around here in Ft Bragg they tape up the "new guys" as a welcome. That
tape is sticky. Probably cost us more than you wanna spend.


Gorilla tape or double face? *I worked conventions for years and years.
Double face was available for the taking, and copious amounts were thrown
away. *Now that I don't work there any more, I am finding out what it really
costs.


What I miss most is "gaffer tape." *I taped down electrical extensions in my
garage that are five years old now, and look new. *Don't know what that
stuff is, but it is GOOD. *Didn't get a lot of it, as the stagehands were
pretty picky about the stuff. *I can see why. *Good ****.


I also miss the copious amounts of 2" clear tape that was left laying
around. *When we cleared the floor, it was sinful the stuff we just piled up
to go to the dumpsters. *In the old days, we could take a lot of stuff. *At
the end, you weren't supposed to take anything that wouldn't fit in your
lunch box. *If you had some juice, though, you could get some bigger
"stuff". *Carpet pieces, parts of displays, items exhibitors had sold to
you, etc. *Like anywhere, it was who you knew.


Steve


I worked for a rock band years ago, doing sound and lighting. *Our
"gaffer tape" was just plain duct tape. *I never knew there was a
difference. *The duct tape held the cords to the floor and stuff like
that, yet it came off fairly easily when the concert was over. *You
now got me asking what actual "gaffer tape" is? *What does it look
like, what color is it, etc.? *

I recently saw gorilla tape in the store. *Never tried it. *I thought
that too was just another name for duct tape. *They also sell gorilla
glue.....- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Ya know, people complain when someone suggests Google as an answer to
a question. They sarcastically ask "What do we need newsgroups for if
Google has the answer to everything?"

I tend to agree, for the most part. A newsgroup offers so much more
detail, opinion and real-life experience than a simple Google search
would.

But I gotta say, a question like "What is gaffer's tape?" just screams
Google at me! I've heard of it all my life, but never knew what it
was.

Now I do.


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"John" wrote in
et:

"SteveB" wrote in message
...
Any good?

Steve



Good question. I don't know if Gorilla Tape is any good.

When I have something where I need tape that really, really sticks
good and will last a long time, I use the aluminum duct tape that the
A/C guys use to tape up ducts. Since the tape goes on the outside of
the duct and the air pressure is outward, it has gotta stick good.
And it does. I bought a large roll of it for about $12 about ten
years ago and I still have a lot left.




Even the cheap Al tape at WalMart is sticky like that. Just not UL approved
for HVAC use.

Once I used it to tape the plastic arm handle on a miter saw together until
the new one arrived. Held up good. Maybe I could have made it permanent
since...


"Remember. It's only temporary...unless it works."
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wrote

I worked for a rock band years ago, doing sound and lighting. Our
"gaffer tape" was just plain duct tape. I never knew there was a
difference. The duct tape held the cords to the floor and stuff like
that, yet it came off fairly easily when the concert was over. You
now got me asking what actual "gaffer tape" is? What does it look
like, what color is it, etc.?

I recently saw gorilla tape in the store. Never tried it. I thought
that too was just another name for duct tape. They also sell gorilla
glue.....


Since some people are dickheads and won't share their hard-won information
from Google, I offer the following from Wikipedia: (and for free, too)

Google does occasionally prove handy.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gaffer tape, sometimes shortened to gaff tape (especially by theater and
photographic professionals), or made possessive, as "gaffer's tape", is a
strong, pressure-sensitive, cotton cloth adhesive tape. It is an essential,
all-purpose tool on theater, film and television productions as well as live
performances and any other kind of stage work.[1]

The most common use for gaffer tape is securing cables to the stage floor or
other surface, either for safety or to keep them out of view of the audience
or camera. Camera assistants use short strips of different colors to lay
blocking markers for actors. Similarly, a narrow version of gaffer tape,
called spike tape, is used in theatre productions for floor layout. It is
also used whenever a quick ad-hoc fix is required, from temporarily
attaching fixtures or props, to salvaging a broken piece of production
equipment. In the absence of console tape or artist tape, live sound
engineers may use a strip of white gaffer tape along the bottom of a mixing
board, to label the channels used for a particular show.

The tape is manufactured in many colors, including fluorescent and custom
colors, but the most common variety is matte black or dull grey. A matte
finish keeps the tape from reflecting light so the tape blends in with the
typical stage floor of a theatre.[2] It is easily torn by hand so no cutting
tools are necessary. The adhesive used is a high quality synthetic rubber
which leaves little or no residue when removed.[3] It usually comes in
2"-wide rolls, and the cloth composition allows a consistent tear, which
means it easily tears into two 1" strips, if needed. Gaffer tape should not
be compared to duct tape, a far cheaper product which does not tear cleanly
and leaves a residue when removed. [4]

It is likely named for the gaffer, the head of the lighting department on a
film crew. When cables are taped down on a stage or other surface, either
for safety or to keep them out of view of the audience or camera,[5] they
are said to be gaffed or gaffered.


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Default Gorilla Tape

On Apr 9, 11:42*pm, "SteveB" wrote:
wrote

I worked for a rock band years ago, doing sound and lighting. *Our
"gaffer tape" was just plain duct tape. *I never knew there was a
difference. *The duct tape held the cords to the floor and stuff like
that, yet it came off fairly easily when the concert was over. *You
now got me asking what actual "gaffer tape" is? *What does it look
like, what color is it, etc.?


I recently saw gorilla tape in the store. *Never tried it. *I thought
that too was just another name for duct tape. *They also sell gorilla
glue.....


Since some people are dickheads and won't share their hard-won information
from Google, I offer the following from Wikipedia: *(and for free, too)

Google does occasionally prove handy.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gaffer tape, sometimes shortened to gaff tape (especially by theater and
photographic professionals), or made possessive, as "gaffer's tape", is a
strong, pressure-sensitive, cotton cloth adhesive tape. It is an essential,
all-purpose tool on theater, film and television productions as well as live
performances and any other kind of stage work.[1]

The most common use for gaffer tape is securing cables to the stage floor or
other surface, either for safety or to keep them out of view of the audience
or camera. Camera assistants use short strips of different colors to lay
blocking markers for actors. Similarly, a narrow version of gaffer tape,
called spike tape, is used in theatre productions for floor layout. It is
also used whenever a quick ad-hoc fix is required, from temporarily
attaching fixtures or props, to salvaging a broken piece of production
equipment. In the absence of console tape or artist tape, live sound
engineers may use a strip of white gaffer tape along the bottom of a mixing
board, to label the channels used for a particular show.

The tape is manufactured in many colors, including fluorescent and custom
colors, but the most common variety is matte black or dull grey. A matte
finish keeps the tape from reflecting light so the tape blends in with the
typical stage floor of a theatre.[2] It is easily torn by hand so no cutting
tools are necessary. The adhesive used is a high quality synthetic rubber
which leaves little or no residue when removed.[3] It usually comes in
2"-wide rolls, and the cloth composition allows a consistent tear, which
means it easily tears into two 1" strips, if needed. Gaffer tape should not
be compared to duct tape, a far cheaper product which does not tear cleanly
and leaves a residue when removed. [4]

It is likely named for the gaffer, the head of the lighting department on a
film crew. When cables are taped down on a stage or other surface, either
for safety or to keep them out of view of the audience or camera,[5] they
are said to be gaffed or gaffered.


I offer the following from Wikipedia

I offer the following, hard-won from Google.

Sincerely,
DH

Wikipedia Banned as a Source
The controversy over Wikipedia continues. Now Middlebury College in
Vermont has decided to ban Wikipedia as a source for projects and as a
study guide because it feels the sites contains misinformation.

USPTO Bans Wikipedia
According to the Sept. 4 issue of Business Week, the USPTO has
recently banned Wikipedia as an acceptable source of information for
determining the patentability of inventions.

Wikipedia banned from UCSC class
SANTA CRUZ - UC Santa Cruz professor Dan Wirls adopted a policy
banning students in his American government class from citing
Wikipedia in research papers.

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"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
...
On Apr 9, 11:42 pm, "SteveB" wrote:
wrote

I worked for a rock band years ago, doing sound and lighting. Our
"gaffer tape" was just plain duct tape. I never knew there was a
difference. The duct tape held the cords to the floor and stuff like
that, yet it came off fairly easily when the concert was over. You
now got me asking what actual "gaffer tape" is? What does it look
like, what color is it, etc.?


I recently saw gorilla tape in the store. Never tried it. I thought
that too was just another name for duct tape. They also sell gorilla
glue.....


Since some people are dickheads and won't share their hard-won information
from Google, I offer the following from Wikipedia: (and for free, too)

Google does occasionally prove handy.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gaffer tape, sometimes shortened to gaff tape (especially by theater and
photographic professionals), or made possessive, as "gaffer's tape", is a
strong, pressure-sensitive, cotton cloth adhesive tape. It is an
essential,
all-purpose tool on theater, film and television productions as well as
live
performances and any other kind of stage work.[1]

The most common use for gaffer tape is securing cables to the stage floor
or
other surface, either for safety or to keep them out of view of the
audience
or camera. Camera assistants use short strips of different colors to lay
blocking markers for actors. Similarly, a narrow version of gaffer tape,
called spike tape, is used in theatre productions for floor layout. It is
also used whenever a quick ad-hoc fix is required, from temporarily
attaching fixtures or props, to salvaging a broken piece of production
equipment. In the absence of console tape or artist tape, live sound
engineers may use a strip of white gaffer tape along the bottom of a
mixing
board, to label the channels used for a particular show.

The tape is manufactured in many colors, including fluorescent and custom
colors, but the most common variety is matte black or dull grey. A matte
finish keeps the tape from reflecting light so the tape blends in with the
typical stage floor of a theatre.[2] It is easily torn by hand so no
cutting
tools are necessary. The adhesive used is a high quality synthetic rubber
which leaves little or no residue when removed.[3] It usually comes in
2"-wide rolls, and the cloth composition allows a consistent tear, which
means it easily tears into two 1" strips, if needed. Gaffer tape should
not
be compared to duct tape, a far cheaper product which does not tear
cleanly
and leaves a residue when removed. [4]

It is likely named for the gaffer, the head of the lighting department on
a
film crew. When cables are taped down on a stage or other surface, either
for safety or to keep them out of view of the audience or camera,[5] they
are said to be gaffed or gaffered.


I offer the following from Wikipedia

I offer the following, hard-won from Google.

Sincerely,
DH

Wikipedia Banned as a Source
The controversy over Wikipedia continues. Now Middlebury College in
Vermont has decided to ban Wikipedia as a source for projects and as a
study guide because it feels the sites contains misinformation.

USPTO Bans Wikipedia
According to the Sept. 4 issue of Business Week, the USPTO has
recently banned Wikipedia as an acceptable source of information for
determining the patentability of inventions.

Wikipedia banned from UCSC class
SANTA CRUZ - UC Santa Cruz professor Dan Wirls adopted a policy
banning students in his American government class from citing
Wikipedia in research papers.

I see nothing wrong or controversial in their review of this type of tape.
I find it informative and educational. Perhaps that is because I am not
educated beyond my capacity and am still learning.

Ever hear of "Big Science"? It might interest you, but I doubt it.

Steve




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On Apr 10, 2:53*am, "SteveB" wrote:
"DerbyDad03" wrote in message

...
On Apr 9, 11:42 pm, "SteveB" wrote:





wrote


I worked for a rock band years ago, doing sound and lighting. Our
"gaffer tape" was just plain duct tape. I never knew there was a
difference. The duct tape held the cords to the floor and stuff like
that, yet it came off fairly easily when the concert was over. You
now got me asking what actual "gaffer tape" is? What does it look
like, what color is it, etc.?


I recently saw gorilla tape in the store. Never tried it. I thought
that too was just another name for duct tape. They also sell gorilla
glue.....


Since some people are dickheads and won't share their hard-won information
from Google, I offer the following from Wikipedia: (and for free, too)


Google does occasionally prove handy.


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gaffer tape, sometimes shortened to gaff tape (especially by theater and
photographic professionals), or made possessive, as "gaffer's tape", is a
strong, pressure-sensitive, cotton cloth adhesive tape. It is an
essential,
all-purpose tool on theater, film and television productions as well as
live
performances and any other kind of stage work.[1]


The most common use for gaffer tape is securing cables to the stage floor
or
other surface, either for safety or to keep them out of view of the
audience
or camera. Camera assistants use short strips of different colors to lay
blocking markers for actors. Similarly, a narrow version of gaffer tape,
called spike tape, is used in theatre productions for floor layout. It is
also used whenever a quick ad-hoc fix is required, from temporarily
attaching fixtures or props, to salvaging a broken piece of production
equipment. In the absence of console tape or artist tape, live sound
engineers may use a strip of white gaffer tape along the bottom of a
mixing
board, to label the channels used for a particular show.


The tape is manufactured in many colors, including fluorescent and custom
colors, but the most common variety is matte black or dull grey. A matte
finish keeps the tape from reflecting light so the tape blends in with the
typical stage floor of a theatre.[2] It is easily torn by hand so no
cutting
tools are necessary. The adhesive used is a high quality synthetic rubber
which leaves little or no residue when removed.[3] It usually comes in
2"-wide rolls, and the cloth composition allows a consistent tear, which
means it easily tears into two 1" strips, if needed. Gaffer tape should
not
be compared to duct tape, a far cheaper product which does not tear
cleanly
and leaves a residue when removed. [4]


It is likely named for the gaffer, the head of the lighting department on
a
film crew. When cables are taped down on a stage or other surface, either
for safety or to keep them out of view of the audience or camera,[5] they
are said to be gaffed or gaffered.


I offer the following from Wikipedia

I offer the following, hard-won from Google.

Sincerely,
DH

Wikipedia Banned as a Source
The controversy over Wikipedia continues. Now Middlebury College in
Vermont has decided to ban Wikipedia as a source for projects and as a
study guide because it feels the sites contains misinformation.

USPTO Bans Wikipedia
According to the Sept. 4 issue of Business Week, the USPTO has
recently banned Wikipedia as an acceptable source of information for
determining the patentability of inventions.

Wikipedia banned from UCSC class
SANTA CRUZ - UC Santa Cruz professor Dan Wirls adopted a policy
banning students in his American government class from citing
Wikipedia in research papers.

I see nothing wrong or controversial in their review of this type of tape.
I find it informative and educational. *Perhaps that is because I am not
educated beyond my capacity and am still learning.

Ever hear of "Big Science"? *It might interest you, but I doubt it.

Steve- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


If you are still learning, how do you know if the Wiki review of this
tape is correct?
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"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
...
On Apr 10, 2:53 am, "SteveB" wrote:
"DerbyDad03" wrote in message

...
On Apr 9, 11:42 pm, "SteveB" wrote:





wrote


I worked for a rock band years ago, doing sound and lighting. Our
"gaffer tape" was just plain duct tape. I never knew there was a
difference. The duct tape held the cords to the floor and stuff like
that, yet it came off fairly easily when the concert was over. You
now got me asking what actual "gaffer tape" is? What does it look
like, what color is it, etc.?


I recently saw gorilla tape in the store. Never tried it. I thought
that too was just another name for duct tape. They also sell gorilla
glue.....


Since some people are dickheads and won't share their hard-won
information
from Google, I offer the following from Wikipedia: (and for free, too)


Google does occasionally prove handy.


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gaffer tape, sometimes shortened to gaff tape (especially by theater and
photographic professionals), or made possessive, as "gaffer's tape", is
a
strong, pressure-sensitive, cotton cloth adhesive tape. It is an
essential,
all-purpose tool on theater, film and television productions as well as
live
performances and any other kind of stage work.[1]


The most common use for gaffer tape is securing cables to the stage
floor
or
other surface, either for safety or to keep them out of view of the
audience
or camera. Camera assistants use short strips of different colors to lay
blocking markers for actors. Similarly, a narrow version of gaffer tape,
called spike tape, is used in theatre productions for floor layout. It
is
also used whenever a quick ad-hoc fix is required, from temporarily
attaching fixtures or props, to salvaging a broken piece of production
equipment. In the absence of console tape or artist tape, live sound
engineers may use a strip of white gaffer tape along the bottom of a
mixing
board, to label the channels used for a particular show.


The tape is manufactured in many colors, including fluorescent and
custom
colors, but the most common variety is matte black or dull grey. A matte
finish keeps the tape from reflecting light so the tape blends in with
the
typical stage floor of a theatre.[2] It is easily torn by hand so no
cutting
tools are necessary. The adhesive used is a high quality synthetic
rubber
which leaves little or no residue when removed.[3] It usually comes in
2"-wide rolls, and the cloth composition allows a consistent tear, which
means it easily tears into two 1" strips, if needed. Gaffer tape should
not
be compared to duct tape, a far cheaper product which does not tear
cleanly
and leaves a residue when removed. [4]


It is likely named for the gaffer, the head of the lighting department
on
a
film crew. When cables are taped down on a stage or other surface,
either
for safety or to keep them out of view of the audience or camera,[5]
they
are said to be gaffed or gaffered.


I offer the following from Wikipedia

I offer the following, hard-won from Google.

Sincerely,
DH

Wikipedia Banned as a Source
The controversy over Wikipedia continues. Now Middlebury College in
Vermont has decided to ban Wikipedia as a source for projects and as a
study guide because it feels the sites contains misinformation.

USPTO Bans Wikipedia
According to the Sept. 4 issue of Business Week, the USPTO has
recently banned Wikipedia as an acceptable source of information for
determining the patentability of inventions.

Wikipedia banned from UCSC class
SANTA CRUZ - UC Santa Cruz professor Dan Wirls adopted a policy
banning students in his American government class from citing
Wikipedia in research papers.

I see nothing wrong or controversial in their review of this type of tape.
I find it informative and educational. Perhaps that is because I am not
educated beyond my capacity and am still learning.

Ever hear of "Big Science"? It might interest you, but I doubt it.

Steve- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


If you are still learning, how do you know if the Wiki review of this
tape is correct?

I am not so anal that I question every nit and whisker. What the intent of
my post was was to say that gaffer's tape is incredible stuff, and I don't
care what it's made of, what it's technical name is, or if it is made on
Mars. I taped down some cords (one of the stated uses in Wikipedia) five
years ago, and the tape still looks good.

About two weeks ago, I put a piece of red duct tape on a cable to mark it.
Today, I took it off. It was frazzled, and I had to use acetone to get the
glue off the cable.

I don't need to read about stuff that I already know. Especially when it's
against what I know.

Do you recall the coffee controversy? First, it's okay. Next it will kill
you. Next, it's good for you.

If you get involved and upset about every current controversy and let the
literati and illuminati govern your life, you may as well go into the
basement and lay in a few years of Depends, Chunky Campbell's soups (they're
delicious), and batteries for your radio.

Steve


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Bought some today and put it on. Seemed just like duct tape to me. Now
I'll just see how long it lasts and how good it holds up. I'm using it on a
3" section of welding cable that got shorted and melted the coating.

Time will tell. In the meantime, I'm sure there will be other trials. I
took off a piece of red duct tape I put on a cable a couple of weeks ago to
mark. The tape had already started to frazzle, and I had to use Goof Off to
get the slimy glue off the outside of the cable.

Steve


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"SteveB" wrote:

Bought some today and put it on. Seemed just like duct tape to me. Now
I'll just see how long it lasts and how good it holds up. I'm using it on a
3" section of welding cable that got shorted and melted the coating.


For that use, I'd want to go with 2-3 layers of rubber tape covered
with 3 layers of Scotch 33 Electricians tape. [and probably somebody
who has done serious electrical work in the last 20 years will have
some improvements on that]

But I wouldn't trust Gorilla, Gaffers or Duct tape to be electrical
insulation.

Jim
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Default Gorilla Tape

On Apr 11, 1:29*am, "SteveB" wrote:
Bought some today and put it on. *Seemed just like duct tape to me. *Now
I'll just see how long it lasts and how good it holds up. *I'm using it on a
3" section of welding cable that got shorted and melted the coating.

Time will tell. *In the meantime, I'm sure there will be other trials. *I
took off a piece of red duct tape I put on a cable a couple of weeks ago to
mark. *The tape had already started to frazzle, and I had to use Goof Off to
get the slimy glue off the outside of the cable.

Steve


I had to use Goof Off to get the slimy glue off the outside of the
cable.

Lighter fluid (e.g. Ronsonal ) and/or WD-40 work great for removing
the adhesives left behind by labels, tape, etc.

Usually cheaper and certainly gentler to the surrounding surfaces than
Goof Off.

Just trying to help.

Sincerely,
DH
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