Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default woodworking/millwork question

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece of
wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this type of
rip have a unique name?

Thanks!
  #2   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
dpb dpb is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,595
Default woodworking/millwork question

Crabshell wrote:
Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece of
wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this type of
rip have a unique name?


Yeah, it's called "resawing". There are a couple of ways -- bandsaw
would be most common, particularly if it is a piece of hardwood, not
just construction lumber so could use the cutoff as veneer stock, etc.

Alternatively, if it weren't, it could just be run through the thickness
planer.

But, to answer the question as posed, most any decent-sized shop should
be able to handle that w/ no problem.

--
  #3   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,469
Default woodworking/millwork question

On 4/8/2008 4:31 PM Crabshell spake thus:

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece of
wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this type of
rip have a unique name?


I think what you're describing is usually called "resawing", and is
typically done on a bandsaw. However, that's quite a thin slice you're
asking for there, kind of the equivalent of using a big-ass cheese
slicer on a 2" board. Very difficult to get a good cut. (It would
probably need to be run through a planer after resawing.) What are you
using this for? I assume it's not cheap pine and that you can't (or
don't want to) run down to the lumber yard and get an 8-foot 1x10.


--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute
conversation with the average voter.

- Attributed to Winston Churchill
  #4   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
dpb dpb is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,595
Default woodworking/millwork question

David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 4/8/2008 4:31 PM Crabshell spake thus:

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece
of wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this
type of rip have a unique name?


I think what you're describing is usually called "resawing", and is
typically done on a bandsaw. However, that's quite a thin slice you're
asking for there, kind of the equivalent of using a big-ass cheese
slicer on a 2" board. Very difficult to get a good cut. (It would
probably need to be run through a planer after resawing.)


A good bandsaw can do this (and much thinner) quite easily. Folks slice
up expensive wood for veneers all the time neatly enough that only a
surface sander is needed to finish them. You don't do it on a cheap 12"
Craftsman bs w/ a dinky little 1/2" blade, though...

--
  #5   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,764
Default woodworking/millwork question

On Apr 8, 7:55 pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 4/8/2008 4:31 PM Crabshell spake thus:

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece of
wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this type of
rip have a unique name?


I think what you're describing is usually called "resawing", and is
typically done on a bandsaw. However, that's quite a thin slice you're
asking for there, kind of the equivalent of using a big-ass cheese
slicer on a 2" board. Very difficult to get a good cut. (It would
probably need to be run through a planer after resawing.) What are you
using this for? I assume it's not cheap pine and that you can't (or
don't want to) run down to the lumber yard and get an 8-foot 1x10.


Why is 3/4" such a thin slice?

R


  #6   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,469
Default woodworking/millwork question

On 4/8/2008 5:01 PM RicodJour spake thus:

On Apr 8, 7:55 pm, David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 4/8/2008 4:31 PM Crabshell spake thus:

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece of
wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this type of
rip have a unique name?


I think what you're describing is usually called "resawing", and is
typically done on a bandsaw. However, that's quite a thin slice you're
asking for there, kind of the equivalent of using a big-ass cheese
slicer on a 2" board. Very difficult to get a good cut. (It would
probably need to be run through a planer after resawing.) What are you
using this for? I assume it's not cheap pine and that you can't (or
don't want to) run down to the lumber yard and get an 8-foot 1x10.


Why is 3/4" such a thin slice?


I guess it's not really. And to reply to another comment up above, yes,
I would say this would want to be done on a good 18" or larger saw.


--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute
conversation with the average voter.

- Attributed to Winston Churchill
  #7   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default woodworking/millwork question

David Nebenzahl wrote in
s.com:

On 4/8/2008 4:31 PM Crabshell spake thus:

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece
of wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this
type of rip have a unique name?


I think what you're describing is usually called "resawing", and is
typically done on a bandsaw. However, that's quite a thin slice you're
asking for there, kind of the equivalent of using a big-ass cheese
slicer on a 2" board. Very difficult to get a good cut. (It would
probably need to be run through a planer after resawing.) What are you
using this for? I assume it's not cheap pine and that you can't (or
don't want to) run down to the lumber yard and get an 8-foot 1x10.



It's Ipe wood and it's for a decorative plaque. The finished plaque needs
to measure 8.5"h x 17"w x 1/2"d (my original post said 3/4"). The only Ipe
I have found online that accomodates those dimensions is 9"h x 2"d, which
is way too thick. The finish has to be pristine being that it's
decorative.
  #8   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 505
Default woodworking/millwork question

dpb wrote:
David Nebenzahl wrote:
On 4/8/2008 4:31 PM Crabshell spake thus:

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a
piece of wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this
type of rip have a unique name?


I think what you're describing is usually called "resawing", and is
typically done on a bandsaw. However, that's quite a thin slice
you're asking for there, kind of the equivalent of using a big-ass
cheese slicer on a 2" board. Very difficult to get a good cut. (It
would probably need to be run through a planer after resawing.)


A good bandsaw can do this (and much thinner) quite easily. Folks
slice up expensive wood for veneers all the time neatly enough that
only a surface sander is needed to finish them. You don't do it on a
cheap 12" Craftsman bs w/ a dinky little 1/2" blade, though...


It's easy enough to do on a tablesaw. I wouldn't do it on a bandsaw.


--
Dave
"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."


  #9   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
dpb dpb is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,595
Default woodworking/millwork question

Dave Bugg wrote:
....

It's easy enough to do on a tablesaw. I wouldn't do it on a bandsaw.


It's far more difficult on a ts than bs (of adequate capacity which any
good shop will have). 9" resawing is beyond the reach of a 10" ts.

--
  #10   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
dpb dpb is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,595
Default woodworking/millwork question

Crabshell wrote:
....

It's Ipe wood and it's for a decorative plaque. The finished plaque needs
to measure 8.5"h x 17"w x 1/2"d (my original post said 3/4"). The only Ipe
I have found online that accomodates those dimensions is 9"h x 2"d, which
is way too thick. The finish has to be pristine being that it's
decorative.


If you're in a moderate or large area I'd say there would be good chance
a shop would be able to come up w/ something far closer to your needs as
starting point.

Does it _have_ to be ipe? There are lots of other dark woods. What
other requirements?

--


  #11   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,823
Default woodworking/millwork question


"David Nebenzahl" wrote in message
Why is 3/4" such a thin slice?


I guess it's not really. And to reply to another comment up above, yes, I
would say this would want to be done on a good 18" or larger saw.


You must be kidding. I'd do that on my Jet 14" saw all day long and have
near perfect cuts ready for the planer to finish. I'll even do it for free
if I can have the other 1"+ left over. Want .25? I can do that too. Want
..125? Yep, I've done it, as can anyone with a decent blade and well set up
saw.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/


  #12   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,946
Default woodworking/millwork question

"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in
t:


"David Nebenzahl" wrote in message
Why is 3/4" such a thin slice?


I guess it's not really. And to reply to another comment up above,
yes, I would say this would want to be done on a good 18" or larger
saw.


You must be kidding. I'd do that on my Jet 14" saw all day long and
have near perfect cuts ready for the planer to finish. I'll even do
it for free if I can have the other 1"+ left over. Want .25? I can
do that too. Want .125? Yep, I've done it, as can anyone with a
decent blade and well set up saw.



Heck, I can do it with my Husky knife :-)
  #13   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,823
Default woodworking/millwork question


"Crabshell" wrote in message

It's Ipe wood and it's for a decorative plaque. The finished plaque needs
to measure 8.5"h x 17"w x 1/2"d (my original post said 3/4"). The only Ipe
I have found online that accomodates those dimensions is 9"h x 2"d, which
is way too thick. The finish has to be pristine being that it's
decorative.


Does it have to be one piece? You often pay a premium for wider boards but
they are available. If you can't find a board wide enough, you can glue two
or more pieces with a perfect joint. Walnut and cherry would be nice also
and on the darker side that you want. 4/4 rough stock will finish at 3/4"
easily.

This will give you an idea of what is available. Keep in mind, it is random
with x 10" long and you must buy the full board.
http://www.cwghardwoodoutlet.com/


Your best bet is to find a local woodworker that would do this for you.
Many of us would do it for little more than the cost of materials. If it is
from a wood I don't have or need, I'd charge you for the full board that I'd
have to buy or you can supply it.


  #14   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,469
Default woodworking/millwork question

On 4/8/2008 6:41 PM Edwin Pawlowski spake thus:

"David Nebenzahl" wrote in message

Why is 3/4" such a thin slice?


I guess it's not really. And to reply to another comment up above, yes, I
would say this would want to be done on a good 18" or larger saw.


You must be kidding. I'd do that on my Jet 14" saw all day long and have
near perfect cuts ready for the planer to finish. I'll even do it for free
if I can have the other 1"+ left over. Want .25? I can do that too. Want
.125? Yep, I've done it, as can anyone with a decent blade and well set up
saw.


OK, I believe you. But do you still say you can do all this, now that
the OP has told us that the wood is ipe? That stuff is harder than hell.

If the answer is "yes", then you must have one finely-tuned bandsaw, and
I congratulate you on that.


--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute
conversation with the average voter.

- Attributed to Winston Churchill
  #15   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 505
Default woodworking/millwork question

dpb wrote:
Dave Bugg wrote:
...

It's easy enough to do on a tablesaw. I wouldn't do it on a bandsaw.


It's far more difficult on a ts than bs (of adequate capacity which
any good shop will have). 9" resawing is beyond the reach of a 10"
ts.


Really? I haven't had a problem with it. Just flip the stock. I do it all
the time. Much quicker, no issue with blade tracking.


--
Dave
"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."




  #16   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
dpb dpb is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,595
Default woodworking/millwork question

Dave Bugg wrote:
dpb wrote:
Dave Bugg wrote:
...

It's easy enough to do on a tablesaw. I wouldn't do it on a bandsaw.

It's far more difficult on a ts than bs (of adequate capacity which
any good shop will have). 9" resawing is beyond the reach of a 10"
ts.


Really? I haven't had a problem with it. Just flip the stock. I do it all
the time. Much quicker, no issue with blade tracking.


Powermatic Model 66 Table Saw Model: 66 specs Blade Diameter (in): 10
Arbor Diameter (in): 5/8 Max. Depth of Cut (in): 3-1/8 (in).

For a 9" piece that leaves you w/ 2" in the middle you now have to do
with something else (like a bandsaw, maybe? ).

W/ a decent bandsaw and a resaw blade, blade drift is no issue.

Post this question on rec.woodworking and I'd bet the bandsaw would be
the choice 10:1.

--

  #17   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,489
Default woodworking/millwork question

On Tue, 08 Apr 2008 18:31:38 -0500, Crabshell
wrote:

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece of
wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this type of
rip have a unique name?

Thanks!


This can be done on a large bandsaw or one equipped with riser blocks.
This kind of cut is called a "resaw." The result is book-matched
pieces.

A tablesaw can rip this cut by flipping the stock, keeping the same
side against the fence, then a handsaw can cut out the remaining
center. With a 10" blade you'll have a 1" center to remove.

Another method is to use a surface planer. With this method much of
the wood is wasted and you get just one piece.
  #18   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,040
Default woodworking/millwork question

In article ,
Crabshell wrote:

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece of
wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this type of
rip have a unique name?

Thanks!


I'm still wondering why you're buying 8' if you only need 17". Don't you
have a hardwood guy in town? An unassuming shed on a back street with no
sign, full of exotic woods from all over the world? He should have a
short piece of it around, or be willing to cut you one. Maybe has the 1
x stock to save you the resaw effort, too.
  #19   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,469
Default woodworking/millwork question

On 4/9/2008 1:23 AM Dave Bugg spake thus:

dpb wrote:

Dave Bugg wrote:
...

It's easy enough to do on a tablesaw. I wouldn't do it on a bandsaw.


It's far more difficult on a ts than bs (of adequate capacity which
any good shop will have). 9" resawing is beyond the reach of a 10"
ts.


Really? I haven't had a problem with it. Just flip the stock. I do it all
the time. Much quicker, no issue with blade tracking.


Yes, but ...

I agree with whoever said that if one were to post this on a woodworking
group, the answer would be "bandsaw" 10-to-1. It's just a better tool
for the job; much smaller kerf, and therefore less wood waste *and* less
power required for the cut, and probably less dangerous too (remember
that ipe is really hard wood). Yes, potential problems with tracking,
but that's what tuning a bandsaw (and learning how to steer wood through
it) is all about.

Of course, if one doesn't have a bandsaw, as I don't ... hell, you could
rip from both sides on your table saw, then handsaw the remaining inch
or so in the middle.

Or you could do it like Noah's carpenters, sawing the whole thing by
hand ...


--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute
conversation with the average voter.

- Attributed to Winston Churchill
  #20   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default woodworking/millwork question

"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in news:A8VKj.1369$GO4.1197
@newssvr19.news.prodigy.net:

http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/


You have the job, and you can keep the left overs!


  #21   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 505
Default woodworking/millwork question

dpb wrote:
Dave Bugg wrote:
dpb wrote:
Dave Bugg wrote:
...

It's easy enough to do on a tablesaw. I wouldn't do it on a
bandsaw.
It's far more difficult on a ts than bs (of adequate capacity which
any good shop will have). 9" resawing is beyond the reach of a 10"
ts.


Really? I haven't had a problem with it. Just flip the stock. I do
it all the time. Much quicker, no issue with blade tracking.


Powermatic Model 66 Table Saw Model: 66 specs Blade Diameter (in): 10
Arbor Diameter (in): 5/8 Max. Depth of Cut (in): 3-1/8 (in).

For a 9" piece that leaves you w/ 2" in the middle you now have to do
with something else (like a bandsaw, maybe? ).

W/ a decent bandsaw and a resaw blade, blade drift is no issue.

Post this question on rec.woodworking and I'd bet the bandsaw would be
the choice 10:1.


blush Of course you're right. For some reason, I kept thinking 6" instead
of 9" for the rip. It was one of those kinda evenings.

--
Dave
"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."


  #22   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default woodworking/millwork question

Smitty Two wrote in
news
In article ,
Crabshell wrote:

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece
of wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this
type of rip have a unique name?

Thanks!


I'm still wondering why you're buying 8' if you only need 17". Don't
you have a hardwood guy in town? An unassuming shed on a back street
with no sign, full of exotic woods from all over the world? He should
have a short piece of it around, or be willing to cut you one. Maybe
has the 1 x stock to save you the resaw effort, too.


I need 24 of these babies, plus backer plates for mounting, plus some other
doodads, and no I haven't found a source in Dallas of all places.
  #23   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default woodworking/millwork question


"Crabshell" wrote in message
...
Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece of
wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this type of
rip have a unique name?

Thanks!


The operation is resawing, as most agreed here. Then you need to run it in a
big ass jointer to get it flat, a planer to get it to even dimensional
thickness and a final pass in the drum sander to get it smooth.

But if you have the skills of the late Dick Proenneke, all you need is a
hand saw!


  #24   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,149
Default woodworking/millwork question

Crabshell wrote:
Smitty Two wrote in
news
In article ,
Crabshell wrote:

Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece
of wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this
type of rip have a unique name?

Thanks!

I'm still wondering why you're buying 8' if you only need 17". Don't
you have a hardwood guy in town? An unassuming shed on a back street
with no sign, full of exotic woods from all over the world? He should
have a short piece of it around, or be willing to cut you one. Maybe
has the 1 x stock to save you the resaw effort, too.


I need 24 of these babies, plus backer plates for mounting, plus some other
doodads, and no I haven't found a source in Dallas of all places.


Call the coach at the local high school (or even the local bowling
alley), and ask where they get their plaques made. Every town I have
ever spent time in has a trophy shop, and they can order all this stuff
premade, cheaper than you can pay somebody to cut it, work it and finish
it, and get all the other dood-dads on your own. The only way I would
bother to to have a specific board made into plaques is if the board
itself had meaning, like if it was ripout material from a historic
building, or a salvaged ship.

--
aem sends....
  #25   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair,rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,575
Default woodworking/millwork question.........Ipe wood

Crabshell wrote:

David Nebenzahl wrote in
rs.com:



On 4/8/2008 4:31 PM Crabshell spake thus:



Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece
of wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this
type of rip have a unique name?


I think what you're describing is usually called "resawing", and is
typically done on a bandsaw. However, that's quite a thin slice you're
asking for there, kind of the equivalent of using a big-ass cheese
slicer on a 2" board. Very difficult to get a good cut. (It would
probably need to be run through a planer after resawing.) What are you
using this for? I assume it's not cheap pine and that you can't (or
don't want to) run down to the lumber yard and get an 8-foot 1x10.





It's Ipe wood and it's for a decorative plaque. The finished plaque needs
to measure 8.5"h x 17"w x 1/2"d (my original post said 3/4"). The only Ipe
I have found online that accomodates those dimensions is 9"h x 2"d, which
is way too thick. The finish has to be pristine being that it's
decorative.


I got curious because this thread has gone so long and, never having
heard of "ipe wood", I did a little
googling. Ipe is not just a piece of wood, apparently. It is
exceedingly hard and also difficult to finish.
If you do a Google search on ' ipe wood "custom milling" ' you will
probably find what I found. Just
for the sake of getting experienced wooddworkers, I'll post to
rec.woodworking.

I had some oak custom cut and routed edges once, for a bargain price.
The jobber told me afterward
that he burned up several router bits, and would have charged me more
had he known how tough it
would be. He did fine work, and stuck to the price he quoted me.


  #26   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair,rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 714
Default woodworking/millwork question.........Ipe wood

Norminn wrote:
Crabshell wrote:

David Nebenzahl wrote in
s.com:


On 4/8/2008 4:31 PM Crabshell spake thus:


Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece
of wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this
type of rip have a unique name?
I think what you're describing is usually called "resawing", and is
typically done on a bandsaw. However, that's quite a thin slice you're
asking for there, kind of the equivalent of using a big-ass cheese
slicer on a 2" board. Very difficult to get a good cut. (It would
probably need to be run through a planer after resawing.) What are you
using this for? I assume it's not cheap pine and that you can't (or
don't want to) run down to the lumber yard and get an 8-foot 1x10.




It's Ipe wood and it's for a decorative plaque. The finished plaque
needs to measure 8.5"h x 17"w x 1/2"d (my original post said 3/4").
The only Ipe I have found online that accomodates those dimensions is
9"h x 2"d, which is way too thick. The finish has to be pristine
being that it's decorative.

I got curious because this thread has gone so long and, never having
heard of "ipe wood", I did a little
googling. Ipe is not just a piece of wood, apparently. It is
exceedingly hard and also difficult to finish.
If you do a Google search on ' ipe wood "custom milling" ' you will
probably find what I found. Just
for the sake of getting experienced wooddworkers, I'll post to
rec.woodworking.

I had some oak custom cut and routed edges once, for a bargain price.
The jobber told me afterward
that he burned up several router bits, and would have charged me more
had he known how tough it
would be. He did fine work, and stuck to the price he quoted me.


I have had success resawing 1x4 IPE to 1/2" nominal using a Delta 14"
band saw with a 1/2" 3 tpi Timberwolf blade. IPE is indeed hard but it
is consistent throughout its width. I ran it through a jointer and a
planer to achieve the proper thickness. I have also eased the edges
with a router. In short, no major problems.
mahalo,
jo4hn
  #27   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair,rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,103
Default woodworking/millwork question.........Ipe wood

jo4hn wrote in
m:

Norminn wrote:
Crabshell wrote:

David Nebenzahl wrote in
s.com:


On 4/8/2008 4:31 PM Crabshell spake thus:


Can anyone tell me if a professional woodworking shop can rip a piece
of wood measuring 9" x 2" x 8' down to a 9" x .75" x 8'? Does this
type of rip have a unique name?
I think what you're describing is usually called "resawing", and is
typically done on a bandsaw. However, that's quite a thin slice you're
asking for there, kind of the equivalent of using a big-ass cheese
slicer on a 2" board. Very difficult to get a good cut. (It would
probably need to be run through a planer after resawing.) What are you
using this for? I assume it's not cheap pine and that you can't (or
don't want to) run down to the lumber yard and get an 8-foot 1x10.




It's Ipe wood and it's for a decorative plaque. The finished plaque
needs to measure 8.5"h x 17"w x 1/2"d (my original post said 3/4").
The only Ipe I have found online that accomodates those dimensions is
9"h x 2"d, which is way too thick. The finish has to be pristine
being that it's decorative.

I got curious because this thread has gone so long and, never having
heard of "ipe wood", I did a little
googling. Ipe is not just a piece of wood, apparently. It is
exceedingly hard and also difficult to finish.
If you do a Google search on ' ipe wood "custom milling" ' you will
probably find what I found. Just
for the sake of getting experienced wooddworkers, I'll post to
rec.woodworking.

I had some oak custom cut and routed edges once, for a bargain price.
The jobber told me afterward
that he burned up several router bits, and would have charged me more
had he known how tough it
would be. He did fine work, and stuck to the price he quoted me.


I have had success resawing 1x4 IPE to 1/2" nominal using a Delta 14"
band saw with a 1/2" 3 tpi Timberwolf blade. IPE is indeed hard but it
is consistent throughout its width. I ran it through a jointer and a
planer to achieve the proper thickness. I have also eased the edges
with a router. In short, no major problems.
mahalo,
jo4hn


it would be a lot easier to resaw short pieces of the Ipe board instead of
the full 8 ft.
I'd cut a bit larger than the finished size of the plaque and then resaw
the short piece,and leave the rest of the 8ft. board the full thickness,for
other projects.

you could also use a 10" tablesaw and ripcut each edge of the [short]piece
and then use a handsaw to cut any remaining material joining them.
They would still need planing,and the tablesaw kerf would eat up more
thickness.But for a 0.5" final,you probably can spare it.You just have to
have a good sharp blade,feed slowly and use the anti-kickback guard.

You could even get closer to your desired 0.5" thickness,and perhaps hand-
plane it smooth.


--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
kua.net
  #28   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair,rec.woodworking
Joe Joe is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 62
Default woodworking/millwork question.........Ipe wood

It's Ipe wood and it's for a decorative plaque. The finished plaque
needs to measure 8.5"h x 17"w x 1/2"d (my original post said 3/4").
The only Ipe I have found online that accomodates those dimensions is
9"h x 2"d, which is way too thick. The finish has to be pristine
being that it's decorative.


You could try starting with Ipe flooring, comes in 1/2" and 3/4" thick,
4"-12" wide and 8'-20' lengths, pre-finished or unfinished, T&G or
straight 90deg edges. Purchase an 2' long, 10" wide, 1/2" thick,
unfinished, straight 90deg edge piece of Ipe flooring. Trim Ends. Route
and finish edges. Commonly available and usually less expensive per board
foot than Ipe boards of similar size.
  #29   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,823
Default woodworking/millwork question


"David Nebenzahl" wrote in message

OK, I believe you. But do you still say you can do all this, now that the
OP has told us that the wood is ipe? That stuff is harder than hell.

If the answer is "yes", then you must have one finely-tuned bandsaw, and I
congratulate you on that.


I've not cut Ipe, but I have cut Brazilian Cherry. Very slow feeding. I
cut some down to 1/4" thick trim.

You have to take an hour or two to get the saw properly set up and you need
a good sharp blade. The one I use for re-sawing is used just for that
purpose. I also had a good teacher.


  #30   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,823
Default woodworking/millwork question


"Red Green" wrote in message
I'd do that on my Jet 14" saw all day long and
have near perfect cuts ready for the planer to finish. I'll even do
it for free if I can have the other 1"+ left over. Want .25? I can
do that too. Want .125? Yep, I've done it, as can anyone with a
decent blade and well set up saw.



Heck, I can do it with my Husky knife :-)


Just be sure to wipe the blood off if you happened to have skinned a 'possum
for dinner first.




  #31   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,946
Default woodworking/millwork question

"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in
news

"Red Green" wrote in message
I'd do that on my Jet 14" saw all day long and
have near perfect cuts ready for the planer to finish. I'll even do
it for free if I can have the other 1"+ left over. Want .25? I can
do that too. Want .125? Yep, I've done it, as can anyone with a
decent blade and well set up saw.



Heck, I can do it with my Husky knife :-)


Just be sure to wipe the blood off if you happened to have skinned a
'possum for dinner first.




Possum? How dare you! Protected species up here at The Lodge. Privledge to
purchase duct tape revoked for infractions. But the dead ones go into
Possum Lake. That's why they call it Possum Lake...ya know.
  #32   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,946
Default woodworking/millwork question

aspasia wrote in :

On Thu, 10 Apr 2008 21:51:27 -0500, Red Green
wrote:

"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in
news

"Red Green" wrote in message
I'd do that on my Jet 14" saw all day long and
have near perfect cuts ready for the planer to finish. I'll even
do it for free if I can have the other 1"+ left over. Want .25?
I can do that too. Want .125? Yep, I've done it, as can anyone
with a decent blade and well set up saw.


Heck, I can do it with my Husky knife :-)

Just be sure to wipe the blood off if you happened to have skinned a
'possum for dinner first.




Possum? How dare you! Protected species up here at The Lodge.
Privledge to purchase duct tape revoked for infractions. But the dead
ones go into Possum Lake. That's why they call it Possum Lake...ya
know.


Kewl! Send me a mailing address. I have a possum that you will just
LOVE! A powerful personality. Has me completely intimidated --
comes through the cat door and ****s up the cat's water dish. So now I
have to slide the closer into the cat door every night. So now my
cat, by now well-trained, goes in and out through a cat door in my
bedroom door (yes, I had one cut in; long story), and through the
miniblinds on my rear window. Scratched up the wallpaper below the
window pretty good.

I'll even send him UPS if it will expedite matters.

Aspasia



http://www.redgreen.com
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
List of software for cabinets, millwork, woodwork. Robatoy Woodworking 0 May 4th 07 04:45 AM
Millwork Detailing Earl Morgan Woodworking 0 March 29th 07 03:12 PM
Flash Gordon Millwork, Inc. [email protected] Woodworking 4 July 22nd 05 01:48 AM
millwork in western massachusetts MARIANNE LANGLOIS Woodworking 3 July 6th 05 05:18 PM
Found a Gold mine in NJ Garfield Lumber and Millwork! [email protected] Woodworking 2 May 20th 05 12:41 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:03 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2023 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"