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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

A friend who used to own a landscaping business told me about a trick
I might try next year - too late now.

He calls it snow seeding.

I told him about an area under a tree in my back yard that never gets
any sun, so I can never grow grass there.

He said next year, in late February, early March, I should sow some
annual grass seed on top of the snow. He says the seed will stay
dormant in the cold, but as the snow melts it will settle onto the
dirt and have a chance to to germinate before the tree fills with
leaves and blocks the sun. The melting snow will moisten the ground to
help the seed get started.

Since I can expect it to die off by the end of summer due to lack of
sun, I should stick with inexpensive annual seed (landscapers mix, he
called it) and expect to re-snow-seed every year.

Anybody heard of - or better yet, tried - this process?
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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

DerbyDad03 wrote:
A friend who used to own a landscaping business told me about a trick
I might try next year - too late now.

He calls it snow seeding.

I told him about an area under a tree in my back yard that never gets
any sun, so I can never grow grass there.

He said next year, in late February, early March, I should sow some
annual grass seed on top of the snow. He says the seed will stay
dormant in the cold, but as the snow melts it will settle onto the
dirt and have a chance to to germinate before the tree fills with
leaves and blocks the sun. The melting snow will moisten the ground to
help the seed get started.

Since I can expect it to die off by the end of summer due to lack of
sun, I should stick with inexpensive annual seed (landscapers mix, he
called it) and expect to re-snow-seed every year.

Anybody heard of - or better yet, tried - this process?


Why try to force something to grow that will at best grow poorly? How
about a rock garden or add any number of plants that will thrive in low
light?
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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

On Tue, 8 Apr 2008 12:42:52 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

A friend who used to own a landscaping business told me about a trick
I might try next year - too late now.

He calls it snow seeding.

I told him about an area under a tree in my back yard that never gets
any sun, so I can never grow grass there.

He said next year, in late February, early March, I should sow some
annual grass seed on top of the snow. He says the seed will stay
dormant in the cold, but as the snow melts it will settle onto the
dirt and have a chance to to germinate before the tree fills with
leaves and blocks the sun. The melting snow will moisten the ground to
help the seed get started.

Since I can expect it to die off by the end of summer due to lack of
sun, I should stick with inexpensive annual seed (landscapers mix, he
called it) and expect to re-snow-seed every year.

Anybody heard of - or better yet, tried - this process?



Havn't heard of this. I know that seed must be in direct contact with
warm soil, else it will rot or get eaten. I'm sure this "snow
seeding" will result in some grass to grow, but I suspect a low
germination rate.
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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

DerbyDad03 wrote:

A friend who used to own a landscaping business told me about a trick
I might try next year - too late now.

He calls it snow seeding.

I told him about an area under a tree in my back yard that never gets
any sun, so I can never grow grass there.

He said next year, in late February, early March, I should sow some
annual grass seed on top of the snow. He says the seed will stay
dormant in the cold, but as the snow melts it will settle onto the
dirt and have a chance to to germinate before the tree fills with
leaves and blocks the sun. The melting snow will moisten the ground to
help the seed get started.

Since I can expect it to die off by the end of summer due to lack of
sun, I should stick with inexpensive annual seed (landscapers mix, he
called it) and expect to re-snow-seed every year.

Anybody heard of - or better yet, tried - this process?


I've never heard of snow seeding and it seems very unlikely to give
anything near a satisfactory
crop of grass. Birds would eat it, some would rot, and if/when some
seed does sprout, part of
the new crop would probably freeze. There is a lot I don't know about
growing grass, but I
wouldn't bother. It would be an interesting experiment ) Is this
what "winter wheat" is?
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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

Very common around the midwest. We call it a dormant seeding. You won't
get quite as good a germination percentage, but it is easy.

s


"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
...
A friend who used to own a landscaping business told me about a trick
I might try next year - too late now.

He calls it snow seeding.

I told him about an area under a tree in my back yard that never gets
any sun, so I can never grow grass there.

He said next year, in late February, early March, I should sow some
annual grass seed on top of the snow. He says the seed will stay
dormant in the cold, but as the snow melts it will settle onto the
dirt and have a chance to to germinate before the tree fills with
leaves and blocks the sun. The melting snow will moisten the ground to
help the seed get started.

Since I can expect it to die off by the end of summer due to lack of
sun, I should stick with inexpensive annual seed (landscapers mix, he
called it) and expect to re-snow-seed every year.

Anybody heard of - or better yet, tried - this process?





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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

Winter wheat also is a 'dormant seeding' BUT it is drilled directly into the
earth BEFORE the snows.

The above mentioned grass technique is better thrown on the ground before
the snow. I think the OP was misled when told to 'throw it on top the
snow'.

s



"Norminn" wrote in message
...
DerbyDad03 wrote:

A friend who used to own a landscaping business told me about a trick
I might try next year - too late now.

He calls it snow seeding.

I told him about an area under a tree in my back yard that never gets
any sun, so I can never grow grass there.

He said next year, in late February, early March, I should sow some
annual grass seed on top of the snow. He says the seed will stay
dormant in the cold, but as the snow melts it will settle onto the
dirt and have a chance to to germinate before the tree fills with
leaves and blocks the sun. The melting snow will moisten the ground to
help the seed get started.

Since I can expect it to die off by the end of summer due to lack of
sun, I should stick with inexpensive annual seed (landscapers mix, he
called it) and expect to re-snow-seed every year.

Anybody heard of - or better yet, tried - this process?

I've never heard of snow seeding and it seems very unlikely to give
anything near a satisfactory
crop of grass. Birds would eat it, some would rot, and if/when some seed
does sprout, part of
the new crop would probably freeze. There is a lot I don't know about
growing grass, but I
wouldn't bother. It would be an interesting experiment ) Is this what
"winter wheat" is?



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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

On Tue, 8 Apr 2008 12:42:52 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

A friend who used to own a landscaping business told me about a trick
I might try next year - too late now.

He calls it snow seeding.

I told him about an area under a tree in my back yard that never gets
any sun, so I can never grow grass there.

He said next year, in late February, early March, I should sow some
annual grass seed on top of the snow. He says the seed will stay
dormant in the cold, but as the snow melts it will settle onto the
dirt and have a chance to to germinate before the tree fills with
leaves and blocks the sun. The melting snow will moisten the ground to
help the seed get started.

Since I can expect it to die off by the end of summer due to lack of
sun, I should stick with inexpensive annual seed (landscapers mix, he
called it) and expect to re-snow-seed every year.

Anybody heard of - or better yet, tried - this process?


I've tilled garden material into the ground, covered with dead leaves
in the fall and in the spring I had so many plants I needed the thin
them - even gave plants to neighbors. Plenty of snow that year.
Perhaps try a light till and seed before the first snow.

What type of trees and soil conditions? You might try to cut a few
cores of your lawn and transplant them to the area you want to grow.
Get them started too see how they grow.

Pick a low light condition grass seed for your area, is another
option.

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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

On Apr 8, 6:19*pm, Oren wrote:
On Tue, 8 Apr 2008 12:42:52 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03





wrote:
A friend who used to own a landscaping business told me about a trick
I might try next year - too late now.


He calls it snow seeding.


I told him about an area under a tree in my back yard that never gets
any sun, so I can never grow grass there.


He said next year, in late February, early March, I should sow some
annual grass seed on top of the snow. He says the seed will stay
dormant in the cold, but as the snow melts it will settle onto the
dirt and have a chance to to germinate before the tree fills with
leaves and blocks the sun. The melting snow will moisten the ground to
help the seed get started.


Since I can expect it to die off by the end of summer due to lack of
sun, I should stick with inexpensive annual seed (landscapers mix, he
called it) and expect to re-snow-seed every year.


Anybody heard of - or better yet, tried - this process?


I've tilled garden material into the ground, covered with dead leaves
in the fall and in the spring I had so many plants I needed the thin
them - even gave plants to neighbors. Plenty of snow that year.
Perhaps try a light till and seed before the first snow.

What type of trees and soil conditions? You might try to cut a few
cores of your lawn and transplant them to the area you want to grow.
Get them started too see how they grow.

Pick a low light condition grass seed for your area, is another
option.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I've heard of it, but never tried it. The basic idea is the seed
gets sown in late winter where freeze thaw cycles help work it into
better contact with the soil. When the soil warms it germinates.
However, as someone else pointed out, I doubt you will get anywhere
near optimum germination, as compared to using a slice seeder. I'd
also wonder what annual grasses there are that are suitable for dense
shade.

But all this is about is a seeding technique, not a real solution to
your problem. Even if you re-seed that area every year, it takes a
couple months for the grass to really establish itself. So, the
amount of time you have anything decent to look at isn't going to be
long. I think a better strategy would be to either thin out the tree
to allow more light in, or else go with alternative plantings under
the tree.
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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

On Tue, 8 Apr 2008 20:30:24 -0400, "Joseph Meehan"
wrote:

Note: check the weed content. Some cheap seed has such a high weed
content that it would be best to avoid it, also consider that there are some
grasses you don't want spreading to your good lawn and some annuals will do
that. Again it is a local thing.


If the manure hasn't been sanitized ; it equals weeds.

Cow pies have weeds

It's local, somewhere...

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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

On Apr 8, 6:14*pm, "S. Barker" wrote:
Winter wheat also is a 'dormant seeding' BUT it is drilled directly into the
earth BEFORE the snows.

The above mentioned grass technique is better thrown on the ground before
the snow. *I think the OP was misled when told to 'throw it on top the
snow'.

s

"Norminn" wrote in message

...



DerbyDad03 wrote:


A friend who used to own a landscaping business told me about a trick
I might try next year - too late now.


He calls it snow seeding.


I told him about an area under a tree in my back yard that never gets
any sun, so I can never grow grass there.


He said next year, in late February, early March, I should sow some
annual grass seed on top of the snow. He says the seed will stay
dormant in the cold, but as the snow melts it will settle onto the
dirt and have a chance to to germinate before the tree fills with
leaves and blocks the sun. The melting snow will moisten the ground to
help the seed get started.


Since I can expect it to die off by the end of summer due to lack of
sun, I should stick with inexpensive annual seed (landscapers mix, he
called it) and expect to re-snow-seed every year.


Anybody heard of - or better yet, tried - this process?


I've never heard of snow seeding and it seems very unlikely to give
anything near a satisfactory
crop of grass. *Birds would eat it, some would rot, and if/when some seed
does sprout, part of
the new crop would probably freeze. *There is a lot I don't know about
growing grass, but I
wouldn't bother. *It would be an interesting experiment ) *Is this what
"winter wheat" is?- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


I think the OP was misled when told to 'throw it on top the snow'.

Not sure what you mean by "misled". Are you saying that:

1- I misunderstood? Nope, there is no question as to what I was told.
I work with the guy now and we've talked about the technique numerous
times.

2- The teller is wrong? All I can say is that he says (and he's in my
office right now confirming it!) he used it for many of his "corporate
accounts" (malls, office parks, etc) where there were trees along side
buildings, etc. He'd snow seed and end up with decent lawns for the
season.

BTW...he also suggested a technique I do use now. I live on a curve
and the snow plow tends to rip up the front edge of my lawn. No sense
spending money on good seed, so I just use an annual in the 3 foot
strip that the plow ruins every year.

BTW 2...the rest of my lawn isn't going to make an appearance on the
Fine Living Network. It's got a better chance of making Desparate
Landscapes, so I'm not concerned with the use of cheaper seed. I
basically want it green, not dirt.


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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

On Apr 8, 2:42*pm, DerbyDad03 wrote:
A friend who used to own a landscaping business told me about a trick
I might try next year - too late now.

He calls it snow seeding.

I told him about an area under a tree in my back yard that never gets
any sun, so I can never grow grass there.

He said next year, in late February, early March, I should sow some
annual grass seed on top of the snow. He says the seed will stay
dormant in the cold, but as the snow melts it will settle onto the
dirt and have a chance to to germinate before the tree fills with
leaves and blocks the sun. The melting snow will moisten the ground to
help the seed get started.

Since I can expect it to die off by the end of summer due to lack of
sun, I should stick with inexpensive annual seed (landscapers mix, he
called it) and expect to re-snow-seed every year.

Anybody heard of - or better yet, tried - this process?


Old seed I feed the birds and squirrels, sure it works to put seed on
snow , but unless its buried with a bit of dirt animals will eat alot
of it.
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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

BTW#1. I'd be setting some concrete posts or very large rocks on that
edge. When he rips that blade OFF the truck one time, he'll learn where the
curve is.

s


"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
...

BTW...he also suggested a technique I do use now. I live on a curve
and the snow plow tends to rip up the front edge of my lawn. No sense
spending money on good seed, so I just use an annual in the 3 foot
strip that the plow ruins every year.

..


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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

In article ,
"S. Barker" wrote:

BTW#1. I'd be setting some concrete posts or very large rocks on that
edge. When he rips that blade OFF the truck one time, he'll learn where the
curve is.



Do you actually live where it snows? How does one "learn" where a curve
is when the entire road is completely obscured by eight foot drifts?



"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
...

BTW...he also suggested a technique I do use now. I live on a curve
and the snow plow tends to rip up the front edge of my lawn. No sense
spending money on good seed, so I just use an annual in the 3 foot
strip that the plow ruins every year.

.

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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

#1. YES and i've operated snow plows for 30 years.

#2. You mark them ahead of time. (if you're senile and can't remember
where they are)

steve


"Smitty Two" wrote in message
news

Do you actually live where it snows? How does one "learn" where a curve
is when the entire road is completely obscured by eight foot drifts?





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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

On Apr 9, 11:08*am, "S. Barker" wrote:
*BTW#1. *I'd be setting some concrete posts or very large rocks on that
edge. *When he rips that blade OFF the truck one time, he'll learn where the
curve is.

s

"DerbyDad03" wrote in message

...

BTW...he also suggested a technique I do use now. I live on a curve
and the snow plow tends to rip up the front edge of my lawn. No sense
spending money on good seed, so I just use an annual in the 3 foot
strip that the plow ruins every year.

.


I'd be setting some concrete posts or very large rocks on that
edge.

Town plows road. Town owns front of lawn and driveway. All
obstructions must be 10 feet from edge of blacktop.

If my daughter's portable basketball hoop is near the road when they
do their Fall drive-by inspections, I get a letter from the town
reminding me of the 10 foot set-back rule.

Besides...it's such a narrow street that if they did not plow it as
wide as they do you probably couldn't get through by the end of
winter.



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Default Snow Seeding - (Lawn care)

S. Barker wrote:
BTW#1. I'd be setting some concrete posts or very large rocks on that
edge. When he rips that blade OFF the truck one time, he'll learn where the
curve is.

s


"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
...

BTW...he also suggested a technique I do use now. I live on a curve
and the snow plow tends to rip up the front edge of my lawn. No sense
spending money on good seed, so I just use an annual in the 3 foot
strip that the plow ruins every year.

.


Put those rocks in the county right-of-way (which is usually several
feet past the pavement AND the gravel), and you'll be paying the county
for a new plow blade, and maybe the whole truck. Most areas specify a
clear zone that must be observed. Also applies to plow/kid-proof
concrete or I-beam mailbox posts being a no-no.

--
aem sends...
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