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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

I'm a few weeks away from buying a new single-wide garage door, manually
operated. Stopped into a showroom yesterday when I didn't really have enough
time to talk for long with the guy. He pointed out a type of spring system
I'd never seen: A coil wound around a shaft, with the whole assembly
installed along the wall above the door opening. He said "Somewhat more even
lift compared to the springs you're accustomed to, but probably not worth
the $28 difference unless you're getting an electric opener...". Then his
phone rang, and one of his installers walked in with a clipboard and a
question. It was 10 minutes before closing time, and I decided to stop back
earlier next time.

Any thoughts on this type of spring?


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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

commonly found on bigger doors, the 'torsion spring' system you saw is
actually a higher quality setup than the 'extension springs' you typically
see on single doors. Although, the low price difference he quoted is well
worth it in my opinion. The fact that you are or are not putting an opener
on it is of no value as to the type of spring system.

s


"JoeSpareBedroom" wrote in message
...
I'm a few weeks away from buying a new single-wide garage door, manually
operated. Stopped into a showroom yesterday when I didn't really have
enough time to talk for long with the guy. He pointed out a type of spring
system I'd never seen: A coil wound around a shaft, with the whole
assembly installed along the wall above the door opening. He said
"Somewhat more even lift compared to the springs you're accustomed to, but
probably not worth the $28 difference unless you're getting an electric
opener...". Then his phone rang, and one of his installers walked in with
a clipboard and a question. It was 10 minutes before closing time, and I
decided to stop back earlier next time.

Any thoughts on this type of spring?



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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

One caveat is that you have to have a decently high ceiling to use the
torsion springs. My garage door when open is only a couple inches below
the ceiling, so I'm stuck with extension springs. Which reminds me; I
fixed the springs and cables when I moved in but never added the safety
cables - I probably ought to do that. I guess I thought I'd have had
the door completely redone by now, but finances have not permitted.

nate

S. Barker wrote:
commonly found on bigger doors, the 'torsion spring' system you saw is
actually a higher quality setup than the 'extension springs' you typically
see on single doors. Although, the low price difference he quoted is well
worth it in my opinion. The fact that you are or are not putting an opener
on it is of no value as to the type of spring system.

s


"JoeSpareBedroom" wrote in message
...

I'm a few weeks away from buying a new single-wide garage door, manually
operated. Stopped into a showroom yesterday when I didn't really have
enough time to talk for long with the guy. He pointed out a type of spring
system I'd never seen: A coil wound around a shaft, with the whole
assembly installed along the wall above the door opening. He said
"Somewhat more even lift compared to the springs you're accustomed to, but
probably not worth the $28 difference unless you're getting an electric
opener...". Then his phone rang, and one of his installers walked in with
a clipboard and a question. It was 10 minutes before closing time, and I
decided to stop back earlier next time.

Any thoughts on this type of spring?






--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

On Mar 22, 10:05�am, "Ralph Mowery"
wrote:
"JoeSpareBedroom" wrote in message

...

I'm a few weeks away from buying a new single-wide garage door, manually
operated. Stopped into a showroom yesterday when I didn't really have
enough time to talk for long with the guy. He pointed out a type of spring
system I'd never seen: A coil wound around a shaft, with the whole
assembly installed along the wall above the door opening. He said
"Somewhat more even lift compared to the springs you're accustomed to, but
probably not worth the $28 difference unless you're getting an electric
opener...". Then his phone rang, and one of his installers walked in with
a clipboard and a question. It was 10 minutes before closing time, and I
decided to stop back earlier next time.


Any thoughts on this type of spring?


Either spring system should work the same on the door opener or not. �If you
are installing the system yourself you may not want the torsion system. �One
slip while tightning the springs and you could be hit by the tightning bars
and be hirt very bad. �If being installed for you , then no problem.


i dont like torsion springs if something breaks thet are a real
hazard, regular extension springs with safety cables are my
preference. and if the system has a problem its a DIY project
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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

In article ,
"JoeSpareBedroom" wrote:

Any thoughts on this type of spring?


It's a "torsion spring".

My two cars are in exile OUTSIDE my garage as I type because one broke
the day-before-yesterday. (There are two torsion springs on my
double-wide door)

This is the second time one has broken in 16-1/2 years.

I am not convinced that the torsion spring is any more reliable than the
more conventional (linear?) springs that parallel the side rails. If
anything, they might be less reliable.

I am waiting for the garage door - and both torsion springs - to be
replaced in a few days. Good luck to us both.
--

JR
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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

On 03/22/08 09:39 am JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

I'm a few weeks away from buying a new single-wide garage door, manually
operated. Stopped into a showroom yesterday when I didn't really have enough
time to talk for long with the guy. He pointed out a type of spring system
I'd never seen: A coil wound around a shaft, with the whole assembly
installed along the wall above the door opening. He said "Somewhat more even
lift compared to the springs you're accustomed to, but probably not worth
the $28 difference unless you're getting an electric opener...". Then his
phone rang, and one of his installers walked in with a clipboard and a
question. It was 10 minutes before closing time, and I decided to stop back
earlier next time.

Any thoughts on this type of spring?


The Wayne-Dalton torsion spring system (it probably has a name, but I
don't recall it) in conjunction with their iDrive opener makes for a
remarkably compact spring/opener combination.

We already had "generic" torsion springs and replaced the original
opener by the "generic" iDrive opener. There were initial problems, and
they sent a new controller board under warranty. Since then, I
understand, the unit has been redesigned.

Perce
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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

In article
,
" wrote:

i dont like torsion springs


I'm not sold on them, either.

if something breaks thet are a real hazard


I disagree. When they break, they remain coiled (loosely) around their
axle. It's a rather safe breakage, actually. Quite loud and certainly
disappointing, but safe.

I do, however, agree with the OP that they can be quite dangerous if DIY
and tightening them. When the door is closed they are under tremendous
tension. Even when the door is open, they are still under enough
tension that, if using an adjustment tool improperly, one can be
seriously injured or killed.

regular extension springs with safety cables are my
preference. and if the system has a problem its a DIY project


I agree.
--

JR
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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

In article ,
"S. Barker" wrote:

The fact that you are or are not putting an opener
on it is of no value as to the type of spring system.


I agree.

One thing is for su My double-wide door is incredibly HEAVY with
only one intact torsion spring. I couldn't get the door open by myself.

The last time a spring broke it was suggested that I replace the garage
door as the original (spec home) door is extremely heavy and is
deteriorating. (It must have a high percentage of particle board as
some of it is visible and rotting away at the (often moist) bottom.

The bid says "insulated steel w/raised panels". Can I expect that door
to be lighter than the one it is replacing?
--

JR


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Default Two kinds of garage door springs


"JoeSpareBedroom" wrote in message
...
I'm a few weeks away from buying a new single-wide garage door, manually
operated. Stopped into a showroom yesterday when I didn't really have
enough time to talk for long with the guy. He pointed out a type of spring
system I'd never seen: A coil wound around a shaft, with the whole
assembly installed along the wall above the door opening. He said
"Somewhat more even lift compared to the springs you're accustomed to, but
probably not worth the $28 difference unless you're getting an electric
opener...". Then his phone rang, and one of his installers walked in with
a clipboard and a question. It was 10 minutes before closing time, and I
decided to stop back earlier next time.

Any thoughts on this type of spring?


Either spring system should work the same on the door opener or not. If you
are installing the system yourself you may not want the torsion system. One
slip while tightning the springs and you could be hit by the tightning bars
and be hirt very bad. If being installed for you , then no problem.


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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

yep.

s

"Jim Redelfs" wrote in message
...

The bid says "insulated steel w/raised panels". Can I expect that door
to be lighter than the one it is replacing?
--

JR



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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

Not if they are adjusted properly and the proper spring has been applied.
There's only about a half a turn of tension with the door open.

s


"Jim Redelfs" wrote in message
...
Even when the door is open, they are still under enough
tension that, if using an adjustment tool improperly, one can be
seriously injured or killed.





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Default Two kinds of garage door springs


"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote in message
...
On 03/22/08 09:39 am JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

I'm a few weeks away from buying a new single-wide garage door, manually
operated. Stopped into a showroom yesterday when I didn't really have
enough time to talk for long with the guy. He pointed out a type of
spring system I'd never seen: A coil wound around a shaft, with the whole
assembly installed along the wall above the door opening. He said
"Somewhat more even lift compared to the springs you're accustomed to,
but probably not worth the $28 difference unless you're getting an
electric opener...". Then his phone rang, and one of his installers
walked in with a clipboard and a question. It was 10 minutes before
closing time, and I decided to stop back earlier next time.

Any thoughts on this type of spring?


The Wayne-Dalton torsion spring system (it probably has a name, but I
don't recall it) in conjunction with their iDrive opener makes for a
remarkably compact spring/opener combination.

We already had "generic" torsion springs and replaced the original opener
by the "generic" iDrive opener. There were initial problems, and they sent
a new controller board under warranty. Since then, I understand, the unit
has been redesigned.

Perce



There will be no electric-powered opener involved with the upcoming door
replacement.


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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

ya, and if you don't know how to drive (about 75% of the GP) then thats
dangerous also. the torsion springs are no more dangerous than crossing the
street after you learn how to do them. And anyone wanting to mess with them
would surely learn first.

s


"JoeSpareBedroom" wrote in message
...
If you know how, it's safe. If you don't know how, it's not safe. Simple!
If you don't know the right way to use and maintain a chef's knife, you
can end your piano playing career. :-)



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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

On Mar 22, 10:25 am, dpb wrote:
wrote:
i dont like torsion springs if something breaks thet are a real
hazard, regular extension springs with safety cables are my
preference. and if the system has a problem its a DIY project


In what way are they any more of a safety hazard for the occasional
break? They're captured on the axle even more solidly than the
extension type w/ a cable is and in a location less likely to actually
have an end strike an individual than an extension spring if were to
break when the garage is occupied...


They can shatter and fling shrapnel. Less risk if the door is raised,
but if it's lowered and the spring is under maximum tension. (Maybe
they put them in a solid cage these days though, I don't know.)

The hazards of installing are overblown imo although do need to know
something about what one is doing (but there are many things for which
that is true).


I think they're most often "adjusted" while already under tension, and
that can be hazardous while not offering the inexperienced a very good
picture of the hazard, which I think is the basis of their reputation
for dangerousness. (Please don't ask how I know.)
-----

- gpsman
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"JoeSpareBedroom" wrote in message
...
If you know how, it's safe. If you don't know how, it's not safe. Simple!
If you don't know the right way to use and maintain a chef's knife, you
can end your piano playing career. :-)


I know how to use a chef's knife but still can't play the piano. What am I
doing wrong?
(I can't sing either)


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Default Two kinds of garage door springs


"Jim Redelfs" wrote in message

The bid says "insulated steel w/raised panels". Can I expect that door
to be lighter than the one it is replacing?
--

JR


Yes, and quite durable from what I've experienced. Properly installed with
the correct springs, any door should be easy to lift. Ask the installers to
show you what should be lubricated every year also.




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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

gpsman wrote:
....
They can shatter and fling shrapnel. ...


OTOH, I've had the end of a tension spring break and go flying as well.

I still don't think there's any significant difference in risk.

--
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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

On Sat, 22 Mar 2008 09:51:14 -0500, Jim Redelfs
wrote:

In article ,
"S. Barker" wrote:

The fact that you are or are not putting an opener
on it is of no value as to the type of spring system.


I agree.

One thing is for su My double-wide door is incredibly HEAVY with
only one intact torsion spring. I couldn't get the door open by myself.

The last time a spring broke it was suggested that I replace the garage
door as the original (spec home) door is extremely heavy and is
deteriorating. (It must have a high percentage of particle board as
some of it is visible and rotting away at the (often moist) bottom.

The bid says "insulated steel w/raised panels". Can I expect that door
to be lighter than the one it is replacing?


Go look at the door somewhere. They're talking I think about one
layer of steel on the outside with insulation of some sort on the
inside. Or is it steel on both sides, with insulation in the
middle? It would make a big difference to some wrt appearance.
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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

On Sat, 22 Mar 2008 13:39:03 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

Any thoughts on this type of spring?


An occasional poster here has an outstanding page on this type of
spring. Did you know they are color coded? Not all springs are the
same.

Thanks to Richard J. Kinch.*
http://www.truetex.com/garage.htm

A good read!
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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

"Oren" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 22 Mar 2008 13:39:03 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

Any thoughts on this type of spring?


An occasional poster here has an outstanding page on this type of
spring. Did you know they are color coded? Not all springs are the
same.

Thanks to Richard J. Kinch.*
http://www.truetex.com/garage.htm

A good read!



Homework! Thanks.


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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

On 03/22/08 11:46 am JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote in message
...
On 03/22/08 09:39 am JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

I'm a few weeks away from buying a new single-wide garage door, manually
operated. Stopped into a showroom yesterday when I didn't really have
enough time to talk for long with the guy. He pointed out a type of
spring system I'd never seen: A coil wound around a shaft, with the whole
assembly installed along the wall above the door opening. He said
"Somewhat more even lift compared to the springs you're accustomed to,
but probably not worth the $28 difference unless you're getting an
electric opener...". Then his phone rang, and one of his installers
walked in with a clipboard and a question. It was 10 minutes before
closing time, and I decided to stop back earlier next time.

Any thoughts on this type of spring?

The Wayne-Dalton torsion spring system (it probably has a name, but I
don't recall it) in conjunction with their iDrive opener makes for a
remarkably compact spring/opener combination.

We already had "generic" torsion springs and replaced the original opener
by the "generic" iDrive opener. There were initial problems, and they sent
a new controller board under warranty. Since then, I understand, the unit
has been redesigned.

Perce



There will be no electric-powered opener involved with the upcoming door
replacement.



Sorry. I missed the word "manual" in your question.

Note that there are now torsion springs that can be adjusted with a
power drill rather than with a pair of bars that can let go and take
your eye out. Saw one at Menards a week or so back.

Perce


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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

On Mar 22, 8:49 am, Nate Nagel wrote:
One caveat is that you have to have a decently high ceiling to use the
torsion springs. My garage door when open is only a couple inches below
the ceiling, so I'm stuck with extension springs. Which reminds me; I
fixed the springs and cables when I moved in but never added the safety
cables - I probably ought to do that. I guess I thought I'd have had
the door completely redone by now, but finances have not permitted.

nate


--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.http://members.cox.net/njnagel


Actually Nate, I just saw a garage with a low ceiling where the
torsion springs were on a bar mounted at the back of the rails,
instead of the front, pretty much even (height-wise) with the top of
the rails. Really cool, but I have never seen this type of thing on
display at a garage door place.

JK
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Default Two kinds of garage door springs

One more thing, for $28, I'd go with the
torsion (better) spring.
You know, a single torsion spring cost
about that. YRMV!

JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
"Oren" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 22 Mar 2008 13:39:03 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

Any thoughts on this type of spring?

An occasional poster here has an outstanding page on this type of
spring. Did you know they are color coded? Not all springs are the
same.

Thanks to Richard J. Kinch.*
http://www.truetex.com/garage.htm

A good read!



Homework! Thanks.


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