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Old February 3rd 08, 02:26 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?

Pete C. wrote:
George wrote:
Pete C. wrote:
"Dr. Hardcrab" wrote:
wrote in message
...
can i use diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace? if so wich diesel
can i use?
Yes, or K-1 (kerosene).

I know. You aren't on automatic delivery and if you run out, what do you do?
Keep a couple of 5 gallon cans around...
Yes, essentially the only differences between the #2 heating oil in your
tank and the #2 diesel at the pump are the transportation fuel taxes you
pay at the pump and the red dye they put in the non taxed heating oil.
Otherwise they are interchangeable functionally, and the heating oil is
also known as "off road diesel" since it's legal to use in off road
equipment.

It is a little more complicated than that. Diesel fuel typically is sold
as "diesel fuel" not a particular # oil. If the diesel fuel is sold in a
freezing climate a certain percentage of #1 is mixed in to minimize fuel
gelling effects.


The same applies to heating oil sold in the same climate since some
folks have outdoor above ground oil tanks just as vulnerable to gelling
as a vehicle.


It is done much differently. They don't blend the oil and offer "heating
oil" except at point of delivery if that is what you specify. They sell
#1 or #2 for home use and if they have never delivered to you they will
ask if you have an outside tank. If so they will flag your account as
requiring #1.

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Old February 3rd 08, 02:30 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?

In article , Pete C. says...

"Floyd L. Davidson" wrote:

wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2008 20:54:48 -0900,
(Floyd L.
Davidson) wrote:

(One effect of the above is that if you buy heating oil
in bulk it is *essential* to make sure the supplier is
aware that fuel bought in the summer will be stored and
used in the winter. Otherwise it is possible to get a
great deal on "summer grade" stove oil, and have a tank
full of jelly come cold weather.)

While this makes sense, why would anyone use heating oil in the
summer? Anyone working for an oil supplier company, should know it's
for winter use........ Otherwise they need to get another job, or
apply for mental health care.....


I'm sure you meant that kindly, but it *is* hilariously
ignorant!

Summers in some places continue to require heat on many,
though probably not all, days. Plus, if you order a 3
month supply of stove oil in a place like Fairbanks
Alaska, it might be 95F on the day you order it in
August, but it might be -45F on the day in November when
the next order is delivered.

On the other hand, in many locations around Alaska the
order is place before the end of July, arrives in August
or September... and is a 1 year supply.


Some folks also like to have hot water as well, and if they heat the
house with oil they usually also heat the hot water with oil.


Right. Either tankless coil or indirect tank.

Banty

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Old February 3rd 08, 02:32 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?


"George" wrote in message
It is done much differently. They don't blend the oil and offer "heating
oil" except at point of delivery if that is what you specify. They sell #1
or #2 for home use and if they have never delivered to you they will ask
if you have an outside tank. If so they will flag your account as
requiring #1.


Or they put in an additive for the #2. Many places around here do not do
#1


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Old February 3rd 08, 03:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?

Banty wrote:

In article , Pete C. says...

"Floyd L. Davidson" wrote:

wrote:
On Sat, 02 Feb 2008 20:54:48 -0900,
(Floyd L.
Davidson) wrote:

(One effect of the above is that if you buy heating oil
in bulk it is *essential* to make sure the supplier is
aware that fuel bought in the summer will be stored and
used in the winter. Otherwise it is possible to get a
great deal on "summer grade" stove oil, and have a tank
full of jelly come cold weather.)

While this makes sense, why would anyone use heating oil in the
summer? Anyone working for an oil supplier company, should know it's
for winter use........ Otherwise they need to get another job, or
apply for mental health care.....

I'm sure you meant that kindly, but it *is* hilariously
ignorant!

Summers in some places continue to require heat on many,
though probably not all, days. Plus, if you order a 3
month supply of stove oil in a place like Fairbanks
Alaska, it might be 95F on the day you order it in
August, but it might be -45F on the day in November when
the next order is delivered.

On the other hand, in many locations around Alaska the
order is place before the end of July, arrives in August
or September... and is a 1 year supply.


Some folks also like to have hot water as well, and if they heat the
house with oil they usually also heat the hot water with oil.


Right. Either tankless coil or indirect tank.

Banty


Or oil fired standalone water heater, for a bit better overall
efficiency.
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Old February 3rd 08, 04:04 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?

On Sun, 03 Feb 2008 05:45:28 -0600, "Pete C."
wrote:

Some folks also like to have hot water as well, and if they heat the
house with oil they usually also heat the hot water with oil.


Exactly. Most homes in our neighbourhood are heated with oil-fired
boilers equipped with internal DHW coils, or in some cases indirect
hot water tanks. In homes with forced air heating systems, a stand
alone oil-fired water heater is commonly used -- older homes with
smaller electrical services in particular.

We use between 450 and 500 litres of heating oil each year for DHW
purposes; a little over a litre a day during the summer months when
inlet temperatures are higher and one and a half litres in winter when
supply temperatures are lower, additional loads of laundry are run
(larger, bulkier and heavier clothing) and longer (and hotter) showers
are preferred. This is a trivial amount of oil compared to most
households, but it represents over half of our total consumption, so
it's the logical place to target if we want to further reduce our
demand [at this point, we're down to roughly 830 litres or 220
gallons/year... the previous homeowners used over 5,700!].

I haven't pulled the trigger as yet, but I'm thinking of adding a Nyle
heat pump to take over much of the work of the boiler, assuming it's
compatible with our SuperStor Ultra tank.

For information on the Nyle heat pump, see:
http://www.nyletherm.com/waterheating.htm

Right now, I can shoot down to Bangor and throw one in the back of the
Chrysler for a little over $800.00 CDN. With an average COP of 2.0,
it would cut our water heating costs in half, plus minimize, or even
eliminate, the need to run the dehumidifier during the summer months.
Between May and September, our dehumidifier averages between 5 and 10
kWh/day, so the Nyle could assume full responsibility for this service
and, in the process, provide us with free hot water. Even with our
modest requirements, factoring in our dehumidifier savings should
reduce our simple payback to just under three years.

Cheers,
Paul


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Old February 3rd 08, 04:40 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?

#1, #2, the question was "can i use diesel in home heating". #1. or #2.
it's still diesel. And i doubt your's is #2 in that climate.

s


"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message
...

"S. Barker" wrote in message
...
heating oil IS #1 diesel.

s


Not here in CT. It is #2



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Old February 3rd 08, 05:10 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?

On Sun, 3 Feb 2008 10:40:25 -0600, "S. Barker"
wrote:

#1, #2, the question was "can i use diesel in home heating". #1. or #2.
it's still diesel. And i doubt your's is #2 in that climate.

s


Our local dealers (Halifax, N.S.) stopped offering #1 three or four
years ago and this caused problems for folks with oil stoves/space
heaters; in most cases, a simple carburetor adjustment did the trick,
but in a few instances, homeowners were completely out of luck.

Interestingly, low sulphur heating oil may offer superior
low-temperature performance; to whit:

".... Don Allen, Jr., President of E.T. Lawson, says his technicians
are discovering clear evidence that the amount of scaling in low
sulfur-burning furnaces is comparatively less than systems used with
regular #2 oil. The corporation is so convinced of low sulfur oil
advantages that it guarantees that the oil will not gel, wax, ice, or
sludge; otherwise, the company promises to clean the entire heating
system for free and refund the cost of the tune-up...."

Source:
http://www.americanoilinvestments.co...ents_4658.html

Cheers,
Paul
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Old February 3rd 08, 05:14 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?


"S. Barker" wrote in message
news
#1, #2, the question was "can i use diesel in home heating". #1. or #2.
it's still diesel. And i doubt your's is #2 in that climate.


Delivery slip says #2

When I was in Italy it was common to use diesel in home heating burners.
Sells for the same high price as heating oil. In mild climates people can
buy five or ten gallons at a time that way.


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Old February 3rd 08, 05:15 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?

"S. Barker" wrote:

#1, #2, the question was "can i use diesel in home heating". #1. or #2.
it's still diesel. And i doubt your's is #2 in that climate.


All my meter slips for heating oil delivery in northwest CT list "#2
Fuel" in the product field.
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