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Default Florescent Tube Lights which to buy?? Hello??

Maybe the server lost this post on some other servers.
Here is my question again....


Lumens=1200 on first 2 lights I bought and they were really dim.
LOWES,HOME DEPOT I couldn't find one higher than 1250 Lumens?

I decided to pick one based on CRI. The higher number was suppose to
be the most bright...

I picked two lights that had LOWER Lumens but HIGHER CRI.

Did I make the right choice, if NO please tell me how to identify
these.

thanks

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Default Florescent Tube Lights which to buy?? Hello??

Crackles McFarly wrote:
Maybe the server lost this post on some other servers.
Here is my question again....


Your first post made it. Not obvious what you are doing and what the
problem is from your post.



Lumens=1200 on first 2 lights I bought and they were really dim.
LOWES,HOME DEPOT I couldn't find one higher than 1250 Lumens?

I decided to pick one based on CRI. The higher number was suppose to
be the most bright...

I picked two lights that had LOWER Lumens but HIGHER CRI.

Did I make the right choice, if NO please tell me how to identify
these.


CRI is color rendering index and indicates how the lamp compares to
natural light (not an exact definition). 100 is maximum. If the light
was very green the CRI would be low. CRI measures color 'quality'.

Brightness is measured by Lumens.

--
bud--
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Default Florescent Tube Lights which to buy?? Hello??

In article , bud-- wrote:
Crackles McFarly wrote:
Maybe the server lost this post on some other servers.
Here is my question again....


Your first post made it. Not obvious what you are doing and what the
problem is from your post.

Lumens=1200 on first 2 lights I bought and they were really dim.
LOWES,HOME DEPOT I couldn't find one higher than 1250 Lumens?

I decided to pick one based on CRI. The higher number was suppose to
be the most bright...

I picked two lights that had LOWER Lumens but HIGHER CRI.

Did I make the right choice, if NO please tell me how to identify
these.


CRI is color rendering index and indicates how the lamp compares to
natural light (not an exact definition). 100 is maximum. If the light
was very green the CRI would be low. CRI measures color 'quality'.

Brightness is measured by Lumens.


The color can match that of daylight or of sunlight or of incandescent
light and the color rendering index can still be anywhere as high as 100
or abysmal, depending on what the spectrum looks like.

Even knowing both CRI and color temperature won't tell the whole story.
For example, upper-grade-triphosphor fluorescents (with CRI in the range
of 82-86) tend to have most of their color distortions in the direction of
colors being "brighter and more vivid than proper", although reds can
appear orangish.
Most non-triphosphor fluorescents (that is, most fluorescents with CRI
above 86 or below 82) have their color distortions mostly in the direction
of "darker and duller than proper". Of course, the distortions should be
minimal if CRI is above 90.

Another thing: Light output is usually compromised if CRI is above 86
or color temperature is above about 4300-5000 K or so.

Keep in mind that there are a few different color rendering indices, and
it appears to me that the usaul one is Ra8 - which only tests 8 colors.
Another tests 14 or 15 (I forget for now). As a result, CRI as used now
only roughly indicates color rendition accuracy.

- Don Klipstein )
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Default Florescent Tube Lights which to buy?? Hello??

On Fri, 26 Oct 2007 10:59:19 -0500, bud--
sayd the following:

Crackles McFarly wrote:
Maybe the server lost this post on some other servers.
Here is my question again....


Your first post made it. Not obvious what you are doing and what the
problem is from your post.



Lumens=1200 on first 2 lights I bought and they were really dim.
LOWES,HOME DEPOT I couldn't find one higher than 1250 Lumens?

I decided to pick one based on CRI. The higher number was suppose to
be the most bright...

I picked two lights that had LOWER Lumens but HIGHER CRI.

Did I make the right choice, if NO please tell me how to identify
these.


CRI is color rendering index and indicates how the lamp compares to
natural light (not an exact definition). 100 is maximum. If the light
was very green the CRI would be low. CRI measures color 'quality'.

Brightness is measured by Lumens.


All I find at Homedepot and lowes are 1200 lumens?

Where do you find lumens above 1200?

p.s. It's a 2-foot piece.

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Default Florescent Tube Lights which to buy?? Hello??

On Sat, 27 Oct 2007 05:06:55 +0000 (UTC), (Don
Klipstein) sayd the following:

In article , bud-- wrote:
Crackles McFarly wrote:
Maybe the server lost this post on some other servers.
Here is my question again....


Your first post made it. Not obvious what you are doing and what the
problem is from your post.

Lumens=1200 on first 2 lights I bought and they were really dim.
LOWES,HOME DEPOT I couldn't find one higher than 1250 Lumens?

I decided to pick one based on CRI. The higher number was suppose to
be the most bright...

I picked two lights that had LOWER Lumens but HIGHER CRI.

Did I make the right choice, if NO please tell me how to identify
these.


CRI is color rendering index and indicates how the lamp compares to
natural light (not an exact definition). 100 is maximum. If the light
was very green the CRI would be low. CRI measures color 'quality'.

Brightness is measured by Lumens.


The color can match that of daylight or of sunlight or of incandescent
light and the color rendering index can still be anywhere as high as 100
or abysmal, depending on what the spectrum looks like.

Even knowing both CRI and color temperature won't tell the whole story.
For example, upper-grade-triphosphor fluorescents (with CRI in the range
of 82-86) tend to have most of their color distortions in the direction of
colors being "brighter and more vivid than proper", although reds can
appear orangish.
Most non-triphosphor fluorescents (that is, most fluorescents with CRI
above 86 or below 82) have their color distortions mostly in the direction
of "darker and duller than proper". Of course, the distortions should be
minimal if CRI is above 90.

Another thing: Light output is usually compromised if CRI is above 86
or color temperature is above about 4300-5000 K or so.

Keep in mind that there are a few different color rendering indices, and
it appears to me that the usaul one is Ra8 - which only tests 8 colors.
Another tests 14 or 15 (I forget for now). As a result, CRI as used now
only roughly indicates color rendition accuracy.

- Don Klipstein )



What this is for is those kitchen, above the sink.
The one I have sucks bad, it's dim.

So If I got for HIGHER CRI and HIGHER temps I should see a better
result??


thanks for you help and time,



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Default Florescent Tube Lights which to buy?? Hello??

In , Crackles McFarly wrote:
On Fri, 26 Oct 2007 10:59:19 -0500, bud--
sayd the following:

Crackles McFarly wrote:
Maybe the server lost this post on some other servers.
Here is my question again....


Your first post made it. Not obvious what you are doing and what the
problem is from your post.

Lumens=1200 on first 2 lights I bought and they were really dim.
LOWES,HOME DEPOT I couldn't find one higher than 1250 Lumens?

I decided to pick one based on CRI. The higher number was suppose to
be the most bright...

I picked two lights that had LOWER Lumens but HIGHER CRI.

Did I make the right choice, if NO please tell me how to identify these.


CRI is color rendering index and indicates how the lamp compares to
natural light (not an exact definition). 100 is maximum. If the light
was very green the CRI would be low. CRI measures color 'quality'.

Brightness is measured by Lumens.


All I find at Homedepot and lowes are 1200 lumens?

Where do you find lumens above 1200?

p.s. It's a 2-foot piece.


1200 lumens is good for a 2-footer single-bulb. Please be aware that
most single-bulb ballasts and many 2-bulb ballasts for 20 watt 2-footers
only deliver about 16, maybe 17 watts per 2-foot bulb even when intended
to be used with 20-watt 2-footers.

One reason is that there is a common size of "E-I" core (5/8 inch square
center leg), overall length 3 times that at 1.875 inches plus maybe 1/8
inch when thickness of a mounting bracket is added in, 1.5625 inches
overall width (mounting bracket may add 1/16 inch to that), and 1.25
inches or a litle less thick not including housing/bracket - thickness
will often be close to 1.25 inches.
Such a long-established size of 110-120 volt ballast for
long-established 20 watt 2-footer has traditionally needed to underpower a
20 watt 2-footer by 15-20%. Many of these ballasts are also rated
for 15 watt "bulbs" and deliver close to 15-16 watts to those. A few of
these are also rated for 14 watt "bulbs" and a few subset of these are
even rated for use with 13 watt T8 (1.8 inch diameter) "bulbs" that have
length close to 1 foot.
This means that even with efficiency increasing slightly with
underpowering, a 20 watt 2-footer rated to produce 1200 lumens has a good
chance with many common ballasts producing about 85% of that - about 1050,
and that assumes optimum temperature (fluorescent "bulbs" are dimmed by
temperature being non-optimum in either direction). Expect less if color
rendering index exceeds 86 or color temperature exceeds 5000 Kelvin.

17 watt T8 (1 inch diameter) 2-footer tends to achieve at least that
much, probably 1200-1300 lumens for slightly optimistic figure for typical
usage (assuming underpowering to extent for such "bulbs" that I find to be
"typical" in my experience, along with the ballasts dfor those being
"electronic" while such size "bulbs" have performance rated on a
more-old-fashioned "magnetic" "standard-for-that-bulb ballast".

- Don Klipstein )
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Default Florescent Tube Lights which to buy?? Hello??

quoting:

Lumens=1200 on first 2 lights I bought and they were really dim.
LOWES,HOME DEPOT I couldn't find one higher than 1250 Lumens?

[...]


You may just have a cheap undersized ballast that underpowers the
tube. Ballasts are universal as well and the bigger the tube, the
more underpowering. Usually the 20W tube is the biggest tube that
size ballast can operate. Though in most good ballasts tube
brightness is faily high across all tube sizes.

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