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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles

http://i20.tinypic.com/24wdmox.jpg

I had installed in a new countertop. The countertop and the tiles
don't meet vertically.
A repair person said that the tile and dry wall will have to be
replaced.


The tiles on the rest of the kitchen (in an L shape) are all in place
on the wall, but they do not meet the countertop either.

****

Two strips of tile (about 3/8") are missing near the corner where an
appliance garage was removed, so that is a problem as well.
http://i22.tinypic.com/6hsrja.jpg

Our countertops did not turn out the way we would like them; so we are
not looking for a perfect-looking kitchen. I have new appliances and
new Armstrong flooring as well. But I think tearing out tile (and I'd
put the same color - white back in) is too much expense. The grout in
betwen is a mauve colored grout, as the countertops were mauve
colored, and now they are beige. But I can live with the mauve color,
even though someone did 'hint' that it looked like it is dirty (which
it is not.)

Some of the tile above the stove was put back in by my husband, so he
is capable of replacing the tiles that are not there.

But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.

Any comments appreciated.

Dee Dee

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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles


"Dee Dee" wrote in message
Two strips of tile (about 3/8") are missing near the corner where an
appliance garage was removed, so that is a problem as well.
http://i22.tinypic.com/6hsrja.jpg



But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.

Any comments appreciated.


How about a photo without all the stuff on the counter? That would help get
a better idea what you are talking about. Meantime, I'd consider some soft
of decorative trim or cove to cover the gap.


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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles

On Oct 20, 4:21 pm, "Edwin Pawlowski" wrote:
"Dee Dee" wrote in message
Two strips of tile (about 3/8") are missing near the corner where an
appliance garage was removed, so that is a problem as well.
http://i22.tinypic.com/6hsrja.jpg


But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.


Any comments appreciated.


How about a photo without all the stuff on the counter? That would help get
a better idea what you are talking about. Meantime, I'd consider some soft
of decorative trim or cove to cover the gap.


http://i24.tinypic.com/jgk1ds.jpg
Here is a picture of where the tiles meet the countertop. It may not
be light enough.

I'm not sure what you mean by "...some soft of decorative trim or
cove..."

I do have some towels up against the space now just to make sure that
no water seeps into the gap.


Thanks for your reply.
Dee


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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles


"Dee Dee" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Oct 20, 4:21 pm, "Edwin Pawlowski" wrote:
"Dee Dee" wrote in message
Two strips of tile (about 3/8") are missing near the corner where an
appliance garage was removed, so that is a problem as well.
http://i22.tinypic.com/6hsrja.jpg


But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.


Any comments appreciated.


How about a photo without all the stuff on the counter? That would help
get
a better idea what you are talking about. Meantime, I'd consider some
soft
of decorative trim or cove to cover the gap.


http://i24.tinypic.com/jgk1ds.jpg
Here is a picture of where the tiles meet the countertop. It may not
be light enough.

I'm not sure what you mean by "...some soft of decorative trim or
cove..."

I do have some towels up against the space now just to make sure that
no water seeps into the gap.


Thanks for your reply.
Dee



From the picture it appears that the countertop extends UNDER the backsplash
tile, but that a small gap remains between the bottom of the tile and the
top of the countertops. I'd consider shimming-up the countertop until it is
flush with the bottom of the tile. The current gap also gives you an
excellent opportunity to get some clear silicone caulk between the two
surfaces before you close the gap.

Just my .02 worth....

Jay


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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles


"Dee Dee" wrote in message
oups.com...
http://i20.tinypic.com/24wdmox.jpg

I had installed in a new countertop. The countertop and the tiles
don't meet vertically.
A repair person said that the tile and dry wall will have to be
replaced.


The tiles on the rest of the kitchen (in an L shape) are all in place
on the wall, but they do not meet the countertop either.

****

Two strips of tile (about 3/8") are missing near the corner where an
appliance garage was removed, so that is a problem as well.
http://i22.tinypic.com/6hsrja.jpg

Our countertops did not turn out the way we would like them; so we are
not looking for a perfect-looking kitchen. I have new appliances and
new Armstrong flooring as well. But I think tearing out tile (and I'd
put the same color - white back in) is too much expense. The grout in
betwen is a mauve colored grout, as the countertops were mauve
colored, and now they are beige. But I can live with the mauve color,
even though someone did 'hint' that it looked like it is dirty (which
it is not.)

Some of the tile above the stove was put back in by my husband, so he
is capable of replacing the tiles that are not there.

But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.

Any comments appreciated.


You wanted any comments, so here they are.

It appears you thought new counter tops would remodel the entire area. Now,
after over spending for a floor & new appliances, you are having buyer's
remorse.

I see no problem with the counter tops, of course you really don't show the
surface area of them. You don't like how the rest of the area meet the
counter. You forget, the tile no doubt was set after the old counter top
was in place. Why would you think the new tops would match the old tile?
Did someone give you a hint they would?

Complete the remodel in the correct fashion. You paid for a half-way
remodel, and you got it. New appliances and floor won't fix the problem at
hand. What in the world were you thinking?




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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles

On Oct 20, 5:15 pm, "O" wrote:
"Dee Dee" wrote in message

oups.com...





On Oct 20, 4:21 pm, "Edwin Pawlowski" wrote:
"Dee Dee" wrote in message
Two strips of tile (about 3/8") are missing near the corner where an
appliance garage was removed, so that is a problem as well.
http://i22.tinypic.com/6hsrja.jpg


But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.


Any comments appreciated.


How about a photo without all the stuff on the counter? That would help
get
a better idea what you are talking about. Meantime, I'd consider some
soft
of decorative trim or cove to cover the gap.


http://i24.tinypic.com/jgk1ds.jpg
Here is a picture of where the tiles meet the countertop. It may not
be light enough.


I'm not sure what you mean by "...some soft of decorative trim or
cove..."


I do have some towels up against the space now just to make sure that
no water seeps into the gap.


Thanks for your reply.
Dee


From the picture it appears that the countertop extends UNDER the backsplash
tile, but that a small gap remains between the bottom of the tile and the
top of the countertops. I'd consider shimming-up the countertop until it is
flush with the bottom of the tile. The current gap also gives you an
excellent opportunity to get some clear silicone caulk between the two
surfaces before you close the gap.

Just my .02 worth....

Jay- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -



Husband says: It is not wise to try to shim something that is this
cumbersome and heavy, and you don't want to come apart. This
countertop was just installed put four joints in an U shape which
weighs approximately 1,000 pounds total.

Thanks.
Dee


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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles


"Dee Dee" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Oct 20, 5:15 pm, "O" wrote:
"Dee Dee" wrote in message

oups.com...





On Oct 20, 4:21 pm, "Edwin Pawlowski" wrote:
"Dee Dee" wrote in message
Two strips of tile (about 3/8") are missing near the corner where an
appliance garage was removed, so that is a problem as well.
http://i22.tinypic.com/6hsrja.jpg


But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.


Any comments appreciated.


How about a photo without all the stuff on the counter? That would help
get
a better idea what you are talking about. Meantime, I'd consider some
soft
of decorative trim or cove to cover the gap.


http://i24.tinypic.com/jgk1ds.jpg
Here is a picture of where the tiles meet the countertop. It may not
be light enough.


I'm not sure what you mean by "...some soft of decorative trim or
cove..."


I do have some towels up against the space now just to make sure that
no water seeps into the gap.


Thanks for your reply.
Dee


From the picture it appears that the countertop extends UNDER the backsplash
tile, but that a small gap remains between the bottom of the tile and the
top of the countertops. I'd consider shimming-up the countertop until it is
flush with the bottom of the tile. The current gap also gives you an
excellent opportunity to get some clear silicone caulk between the two
surfaces before you close the gap.

Just my .02 worth....

Jay- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -



Husband says: It is not wise to try to shim something that is this
cumbersome and heavy, and you don't want to come apart. This
countertop was just installed put four joints in an U shape which
weighs approximately 1,000 pounds total.


Why was the countertop not built higher to fill the gap?

You could just fill the gap with appropriately cut wood trim, then caulk.

Bob


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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles


"Dee Dee" wrote in message

http://i24.tinypic.com/jgk1ds.jpg
Here is a picture of where the tiles meet the countertop. It may not
be light enough.

I'm not sure what you mean by "...some soft of decorative trim or
cove..."

I do have some towels up against the space now just to make sure that
no water seeps into the gap.


If you go to a real tile store, they will have small tile trim pieces that
can be put in place to cover the gap. Just as you have baseboards and
quarter round moldings on the floor, this would fill and/or cover the void.

See the suggestions that Steve posted earlier. He has good suggestions and
options.


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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles

On Oct 20, 7:17 pm, Steve wrote:
Dee Dee wrote on 20 Oct 2007 in group
alt.home.repair:





http://i20.tinypic.com/24wdmox.jpg


I had installed in a new countertop. The countertop and the tiles
don't meet vertically.
A repair person said that the tile and dry wall will have to be
replaced.


The tiles on the rest of the kitchen (in an L shape) are all in place
on the wall, but they do not meet the countertop either.


****


Two strips of tile (about 3/8") are missing near the corner where an
appliance garage was removed, so that is a problem as well.
http://i22.tinypic.com/6hsrja.jpg


Our countertops did not turn out the way we would like them; so we are
not looking for a perfect-looking kitchen. I have new appliances and
new Armstrong flooring as well. But I think tearing out tile (and I'd
put the same color - white back in) is too much expense. The grout in
betwen is a mauve colored grout, as the countertops were mauve
colored, and now they are beige. But I can live with the mauve color,
even though someone did 'hint' that it looked like it is dirty (which
it is not.)


Some of the tile above the stove was put back in by my husband, so he
is capable of replacing the tiles that are not there.


But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.


Some options, in decreasing order of my preference:

1. The counter installers should have shimmed the new counter to the
same height as the old counter. Ask them to come back and do it right.
Whether they agree will depend on how nicely you ask and what is in your
contract. They'll have to completely remove and reinstall the
countertops, so you're asking for a lot. You'll be lucky if they agree.

2. Take a sample of the tile to a real tile store, not a big box place.
They'll help you match some trim pieces that look like the trim you put
around wooden cabinets. They come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. I
would pick something like quarter-round or cove molding (Google for
these terms if you don't know what they mean). Put some silicone caulk
in the gap, then apply the trim pieces as recommend by the tile pro --
or have them do it.

3. Do #2, but use wood trim instead. It'll still look nice and be
cheaper, but won't be as waterproof. You can match the color of your
cabinets.

4. Get a real paint store, not a big box place, to custom-tint some
caulk for you to match your existing grout. Use it to fill the void. No
one will notice that the bottom grout line is a little bigger unless you
point it out. If you're lucky, one of the standard colors will match.

5. Do #4, but use custom-tinted grout. This is tougher to do that #4
because grout changes colors as it cures, while caulk usually stays the
same.

--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Thanks for all your suggestions.

1. This was discussed with installers previously; we will not be in
contact with our installers anymore; this is only a small part of the
reason.

2. Yes, we have looked at the quarter-round tile pieces and brought
home a few samples. I will take a sample of the Cambria and the
matching trim-piece tile and ask if the silicone caulking will adhere
to the tile and trim-tile and Cambria. But I assume you think it will
work as you suggested it.

3. I hadn't thought of wood trim. We had as a counter-top previously
(formica) that had wood-trim all around it. I don't know what wood it
was, but even though the stain became worn-looking over the years, the
wood was certainly strong and still intact. It is a consideration;
thanks.

4. We have been to a paint store and matched our grout to a
successful color and he has already bought the tile and grout to
match; but Husband thinks the hole is too large to fill with grout.
hmmm ---

Thanks for your thoughtful answers.
Dee





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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles

On Oct 20, 7:17 pm, Steve wrote:
Dee Dee wrote on 20 Oct 2007 in group
alt.home.repair:





http://i20.tinypic.com/24wdmox.jpg


I had installed in a new countertop. The countertop and the tiles
don't meet vertically.
A repair person said that the tile and dry wall will have to be
replaced.


The tiles on the rest of the kitchen (in an L shape) are all in place
on the wall, but they do not meet the countertop either.


****


Two strips of tile (about 3/8") are missing near the corner where an
appliance garage was removed, so that is a problem as well.
http://i22.tinypic.com/6hsrja.jpg


Our countertops did not turn out the way we would like them; so we are
not looking for a perfect-looking kitchen. I have new appliances and
new Armstrong flooring as well. But I think tearing out tile (and I'd
put the same color - white back in) is too much expense. The grout in
betwen is a mauve colored grout, as the countertops were mauve
colored, and now they are beige. But I can live with the mauve color,
even though someone did 'hint' that it looked like it is dirty (which
it is not.)


Some of the tile above the stove was put back in by my husband, so he
is capable of replacing the tiles that are not there.


But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.


Some options, in decreasing order of my preference:

1. The counter installers should have shimmed the new counter to the
same height as the old counter. Ask them to come back and do it right.
Whether they agree will depend on how nicely you ask and what is in your
contract. They'll have to completely remove and reinstall the
countertops, so you're asking for a lot. You'll be lucky if they agree.

2. Take a sample of the tile to a real tile store, not a big box place.
They'll help you match some trim pieces that look like the trim you put
around wooden cabinets. They come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. I
would pick something like quarter-round or cove molding (Google for
these terms if you don't know what they mean). Put some silicone caulk
in the gap, then apply the trim pieces as recommend by the tile pro --
or have them do it.

3. Do #2, but use wood trim instead. It'll still look nice and be
cheaper, but won't be as waterproof. You can match the color of your
cabinets.

4. Get a real paint store, not a big box place, to custom-tint some
caulk for you to match your existing grout. Use it to fill the void. No
one will notice that the bottom grout line is a little bigger unless you
point it out. If you're lucky, one of the standard colors will match.

5. Do #4, but use custom-tinted grout. This is tougher to do that #4
because grout changes colors as it cures, while caulk usually stays the
same.

--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Steve, I may be replying twice, my posting didn't 'seem' to go
through.

Thanks for all your suggestions.

1. This was discussed with installers previously; we will not be in
contact with our installers anymore; this is only a small part of the
reason.

2. Yes, we have looked at the quarter-round tile pieces and brought
home a few samples. I will take a sample of the Cambria and the
matching trim-piece tile and ask if the silicone caulking will adhere
to the tile and trim-tile and Cambria. But I assume you think it will
work as you suggested it.

3. I hadn't thought of wood trim. We had as a counter-top previously
(formica) that had wood-trim all around it. I don't know what wood it
was, but even though the stain became worn-looking over the years, the
wood was certainly strong and still intact. It is a consideration;
thanks.

4. We have been to a paint store and matched our grout to a
successful color and he has already bought the tile and grout to
match; but Husband thinks the hole is too large to fill with grout.
hmmm ---

Thanks so much for your thoughtful answers.
Dee



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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles

On Oct 20, 8:35 pm, "Bob F" wrote:


Why was the countertop not built higher to fill the gap?


It wasn't.

You could just fill the gap with appropriately cut wood trim, then caulk.


I like that suggestion, as Steve also gave. The only problem I can see
with it is that (naturally) it will be at the back of the sink where
water can run back into it. A spray of vinegar or clean-up cleaners
that might be used to clean the counter top would not be that good for
wood trim. Just washing up each day would tend to wear out the wood
trim much faster (of course) than the Cambria or tile would ever wear
out; then what to do.

I think it would look nice, though.
Thanks for your suggestion.
Dee


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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles


4. We have been to a paint store and matched our grout to a
successful color and he has already bought the tile and grout to
match; but Husband thinks the hole is too large to fill with grout.
hmmm ---


You would never fill a gap between a horizontal and vertical surface
with grout anyway. By the scale of your photos, it almost looks small
enough to caulk. Maybe with a caulk backer rod and a close color
match for the caulk (tile store), you might be able to make it work.
If you are a good caulker, a pro should do it so it will look
acceptable.

A paint store matched grout???

JK




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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles

On Oct 21, 12:36 am, Big_Jake wrote:
4. We have been to a paint store and matched our grout to a
successful color and he has already bought the tile and grout to
match; but Husband thinks the hole is too large to fill with grout.
hmmm ---


You would never fill a gap between a horizontal and vertical surface
with grout anyway.


Why is that?



By the scale of your photos, it almost looks small
enough to caulk. Maybe with a caulk backer rod


What is a caulk backer rod?


and a close color
match for the caulk (tile store), you might be able to make it work.
If you are a good caulker, a pro should do it so it will look
acceptable.

A paint store matched grout???

JK



Yes, we have matched the grout that we have in place now. We have used
the grout replace some of the other tiles.

No, we have not matched a caulk to the color of our grout.

Thanks.
Dee

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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles

"Dee Dee" wrote in message
ups.com...

You could just fill the gap with appropriately cut wood trim, then

caulk.

I like that suggestion, as Steve also gave. The only problem I can see
with it is that (naturally) it will be at the back of the sink where
water can run back into it. A spray of vinegar or clean-up cleaners
that might be used to clean the counter top would not be that good for
wood trim. Just washing up each day would tend to wear out the wood
trim much faster (of course) than the Cambria or tile would ever wear
out; then what to do.


Your countertop installer seems to have been incompetent.
He ought to have described to you what a BACKSPLASH
is and does. This is usually made of either countertop
material or wall surfacing. When well-installed, a
backsplash is waterproof.

--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)


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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles

Dee Dee wrote:


But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.

Any comments appreciated.

Dee Dee


Wow - tons of good ideas given already, but you may consider having some
of the countertop material cut into narrow strips and have them put a
rounded edge on the top of it. Square edge on bottom to sit on the
counter. Similar to this picture.
http://www.floormall.com/images/Dalt...6_Bullnose.jpg

Thin enough to not be too obtrusive and tall enough to cover the gap it
could sit down tight to the countertop w/ the rounded edge on top,
butted end to end tight together. Stick the pieces on the tile with a
thin bead of silicone.


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"Mark" wrote in message
...
You are fortunate that the tile is pretty plan. You should be able to
find a complementary trim tile that you could use to fill the gap. But I
agree, the contactor that installed the counter should have stopped and
consulted you about the gap before finishing the installation. Installing
a shim piece on the cabinet would have been a much better solution.


Maybe, but since the front is visible, that 3/8" shim will look like crap.

Often, there is no simple answer. Make the top thicker? That would look
out of scale. Replace the wall tile? That would look the best, but is
expensive and time consuming.

Too many times I've started with a simple spruce up or paint one room and
end up doing major work as there is never a clean line to stop and not
affect the rest of the room or the next room.


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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles

On Oct 21, 1:45 pm, Manster wrote:
Dee Dee wrote:

But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.


Any comments appreciated.


Dee Dee


Wow - tons of good ideas given already, but you may consider having some
of the countertop material cut into narrow strips and have them put a
rounded edge on the top of it. Square edge on bottom to sit on the
counter. Similar to this picture.http://www.floormall.com/images/Dalt...6_Bullnose.jpg

Thin enough to not be too obtrusive and tall enough to cover the gap it
could sit down tight to the countertop w/ the rounded edge on top,
butted end to end tight together. Stick the pieces on the tile with a
thin bead of silicone.




Thanks, All. We are not dealing with the installer or supplier
anymore. A small bullnose type quarter-round in the Cambria material
is not feasible (see next paragraph) but we are considering this type
of solution with a bull-nose or quarter-round tile piece using
silicone, thanks to the suggestions.

They said the wall is too irregular for a solid long backsplash in the
Cambria material, so maybe a shorter tile overlapping will be the
solution.

Thanks for confirming not to use grout.

Dee Dee




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On Oct 21, 10:40 am, "Don Phillipson"
wrote:
"Dee Dee" wrote in message

ups.com...



You could just fill the gap with appropriately cut wood trim, then

caulk.

I like that suggestion, as Steve also gave. The only problem I can see
with it is that (naturally) it will be at the back of the sink where
water can run back into it. A spray of vinegar or clean-up cleaners
that might be used to clean the counter top would not be that good for
wood trim. Just washing up each day would tend to wear out the wood
trim much faster (of course) than the Cambria or tile would ever wear
out; then what to do.


Your countertop installer seems to have been incompetent.
He ought to have described to you what a BACKSPLASH
is and does. This is usually made of either countertop
material or wall surfacing. When well-installed, a
backsplash is waterproof.

--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)


He said that our walls were too irregular to use a backsplash. I
don't like the looks of a backsplash anyway. Reminds me of a
restroom.
Thanks.
Dee Dee

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On Oct 21, 9:53 pm, "Edwin Pawlowski" wrote:
"Mark" wrote in message

...

You are fortunate that the tile is pretty plan. You should be able to
find a complementary trim tile that you could use to fill the gap. But I
agree, the contactor that installed the counter should have stopped and
consulted you about the gap before finishing the installation. Installing
a shim piece on the cabinet would have been a much better solution.


Maybe, but since the front is visible, that 3/8" shim will look like crap.

Often, there is no simple answer. Make the top thicker? That would look
out of scale. Replace the wall tile? That would look the best, but is
expensive and time consuming.

Too many times I've started with a simple spruce up or paint one room and
end up doing major work as there is never a clean line to stop and not
affect the rest of the room or the next room.


Right you are, Ed. We've decided that to replace the wall and the
tile is just too much problem and expense because the rest of the job
is not done perfectly.
But we don't want to have a totally botched up kitchen, and want to
keep things to a minimum.

Thanks for your reply.
Dee

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Default Counterytop doesn't meet tiles


"Dee Dee" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Oct 20, 7:17 pm, Steve wrote:
Dee Dee wrote on 20 Oct 2007 in group
alt.home.repair:





http://i20.tinypic.com/24wdmox.jpg


I had installed in a new countertop. The countertop and the tiles
don't meet vertically.
A repair person said that the tile and dry wall will have to be
replaced.


The tiles on the rest of the kitchen (in an L shape) are all in place
on the wall, but they do not meet the countertop either.


****


Two strips of tile (about 3/8") are missing near the corner where an
appliance garage was removed, so that is a problem as well.
http://i22.tinypic.com/6hsrja.jpg


Our countertops did not turn out the way we would like them; so we are
not looking for a perfect-looking kitchen. I have new appliances and
new Armstrong flooring as well. But I think tearing out tile (and I'd
put the same color - white back in) is too much expense. The grout in
betwen is a mauve colored grout, as the countertops were mauve
colored, and now they are beige. But I can live with the mauve color,
even though someone did 'hint' that it looked like it is dirty (which
it is not.)


Some of the tile above the stove was put back in by my husband, so he
is capable of replacing the tiles that are not there.


But we can't get any advise on what product or technique to fill the
space between the Cambria countertops and the tile if we do not want
to replace all the tile.


Some options, in decreasing order of my preference:

1. The counter installers should have shimmed the new counter to the
same height as the old counter. Ask them to come back and do it right.
Whether they agree will depend on how nicely you ask and what is in your
contract. They'll have to completely remove and reinstall the
countertops, so you're asking for a lot. You'll be lucky if they agree.

2. Take a sample of the tile to a real tile store, not a big box place.
They'll help you match some trim pieces that look like the trim you put
around wooden cabinets. They come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. I
would pick something like quarter-round or cove molding (Google for
these terms if you don't know what they mean). Put some silicone caulk
in the gap, then apply the trim pieces as recommend by the tile pro --
or have them do it.

3. Do #2, but use wood trim instead. It'll still look nice and be
cheaper, but won't be as waterproof. You can match the color of your
cabinets.

4. Get a real paint store, not a big box place, to custom-tint some
caulk for you to match your existing grout. Use it to fill the void. No
one will notice that the bottom grout line is a little bigger unless you
point it out. If you're lucky, one of the standard colors will match.

5. Do #4, but use custom-tinted grout. This is tougher to do that #4
because grout changes colors as it cures, while caulk usually stays the
same.

--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Thanks for all your suggestions.

1. This was discussed with installers previously; we will not be in
contact with our installers anymore; this is only a small part of the
reason.

2. Yes, we have looked at the quarter-round tile pieces and brought
home a few samples. I will take a sample of the Cambria and the
matching trim-piece tile and ask if the silicone caulking will adhere
to the tile and trim-tile and Cambria. But I assume you think it will
work as you suggested it.

3. I hadn't thought of wood trim. We had as a counter-top previously
(formica) that had wood-trim all around it. I don't know what wood it
was, but even though the stain became worn-looking over the years, the
wood was certainly strong and still intact. It is a consideration;
thanks.

4. We have been to a paint store and matched our grout to a
successful color and he has already bought the tile and grout to
match; but Husband thinks the hole is too large to fill with grout.
hmmm ---


Caulk would be better than grout. You need some flexibility where surfaces meet.
Tile stores can sell you caulk that matches the grout they sell.

Bob


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