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Default What to secure shingles with

I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one or
two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical shingles
that you find everywhere.

Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.

John

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Default What to secure shingles with

On Sep 28, 4:29 pm, runsrealfast wrote:
I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one or
two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical shingles
that you find everywhere.

Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.

John


Galvanized Roofing Nails, 1 3/4" should be a good size.

JK

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Default What to secure shingles with

On Sep 28, 3:51 pm, Big_Jake wrote:
On Sep 28, 4:29 pm, runsrealfast wrote:

I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one or
two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical shingles
that you find everywhere.


Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.


John


Galvanized Roofing Nails, 1 3/4" should be a good size.

JK


Thanks

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Default What to secure shingles with

runsrealfast wrote:
I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one or
two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical shingles
that you find everywhere.

Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.

John


As BigJake says, nails are the standard for attaching the tops of the
shingles, up under the flaps of the row above. The bottoms of the flaps
are held down by a heat-activated adhesive which will attach them pretty
securely on the first hot and sunny day. If you are in a season where
there aren't likely to be an really good days for melting adhesive then
several dabs of roofing cement under the flaps will do the job as soon
as you press them down. In those cases where there might be nail heads
exposed after a repair, and there should almost never be such except
around some types of flashing, a dab of cement over each head will
ensure a decent seal. Typically the cement is black and comes in
caulking compound tubes and is very cheap.

Oh, and when replacing shingles you may find that lifting the flaps on
the row above where you are working may cause cracks if the roof is old.
Great care is called for.

--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
http://johnmcgaw.com
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Default What to secure shingles with

On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 14:29:38 -0700, runsrealfast
wrote:

I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one or
two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical shingles
that you find everywhere.

Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.

John


A 3-tab shingle is typically held in place with 8 nails, 2 nails above
each crack separating the tabs, 2 on each edge of the shingle, all in
a row, and then another 4 nails from the row immediately above it. To
remove the bad shingle you have to pop the nails for the shingle
itself and then the nails for the row above it. The shingle should
slide right out. That's assuming the tar strip holding the rows
together has already been broken when removing the nails.

That means you have to bend up the row immediately above the shingle
being replaced and the row above that to remove and later pound in the
nails. This is tricky because old shingles are often very brittle and
you end up breaking the shingles you want to remain in place. I just
went thorugh this with my house and ended up replacing far more than
just the one bad shingle.

You'll need a very fine prybar to get under the nail heads to pop them
out. What works for me is an old flat screwdriver (my general-purpose
do-anything-but-dont-use-to-drive-screws screwdriver) that I hook
under the nail head and pry up on.

removing the nails also leaves holes in the remaining shingles so
you'll need a tube of roofing tar to seal the holes and also to dab
under the shingles to kind of glue them back down.

-dickm


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Default What to secure shingles with

dicko wrote:
On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 14:29:38 -0700, runsrealfast
wrote:

I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one
or two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical
shingles that you find everywhere.

Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.

John


A 3-tab shingle is typically held in place with 8 nails, 2 nails above
each crack separating the tabs, 2 on each edge of the shingle, all in
a row, and then another 4 nails from the row immediately above it. To
remove the bad shingle you have to pop the nails for the shingle
itself and then the nails for the row above it. The shingle should
slide right out. That's assuming the tar strip holding the rows
together has already been broken when removing the nails.

That means you have to bend up the row immediately above the shingle
being replaced and the row above that to remove and later pound in the
nails. This is tricky because old shingles are often very brittle and
you end up breaking the shingles you want to remain in place. I just
went thorugh this with my house and ended up replacing far more than
just the one bad shingle.

You'll need a very fine prybar to get under the nail heads to pop them
out. What works for me is an old flat screwdriver (my general-purpose
do-anything-but-dont-use-to-drive-screws screwdriver) that I hook
under the nail head and pry up on.

removing the nails also leaves holes in the remaining shingles so
you'll need a tube of roofing tar to seal the holes and also to dab
under the shingles to kind of glue them back down.


I'm surfing from the UK.

Words change their meaning travelling across The Pond. I guess "roof
shingles" now covers most types of "tiles". I've sadly deleted the start
to this thread and so do not know whether the OP referred to a specific
type of shingle.

I think you are referring to a concrete shingle, (but I could easily be
wrong!) - how wide are these? In the UK we use just two nails to clip
them to the top of the batten - not eight. Our's are about 9 to 12"
wide.

Once upon a time, all our roofing material used to come from N Wales -
slate, which made for a pleasing appearance. Sadly, today most are
concrete and bespoke homes are rooved with slate from China.

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Default What to secure shingles with

clot wrote:
dicko wrote:

On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 14:29:38 -0700, runsrealfast
wrote:

I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one
or two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical
shingles that you find everywhere.

Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.

John



A 3-tab shingle is typically held in place with 8 nails, 2 nails above
each crack separating the tabs, 2 on each edge of the shingle, all in
a row, and then another 4 nails from the row immediately above it. To
remove the bad shingle you have to pop the nails for the shingle
itself and then the nails for the row above it. The shingle should
slide right out. That's assuming the tar strip holding the rows
together has already been broken when removing the nails.

That means you have to bend up the row immediately above the shingle
being replaced and the row above that to remove and later pound in the
nails. This is tricky because old shingles are often very brittle and
you end up breaking the shingles you want to remain in place. I just
went thorugh this with my house and ended up replacing far more than
just the one bad shingle.

You'll need a very fine prybar to get under the nail heads to pop them
out. What works for me is an old flat screwdriver (my general-purpose
do-anything-but-dont-use-to-drive-screws screwdriver) that I hook
under the nail head and pry up on.

removing the nails also leaves holes in the remaining shingles so
you'll need a tube of roofing tar to seal the holes and also to dab
under the shingles to kind of glue them back down.



I'm surfing from the UK.

Words change their meaning travelling across The Pond. I guess "roof
shingles" now covers most types of "tiles". I've sadly deleted the start
to this thread and so do not know whether the OP referred to a specific
type of shingle.

I think you are referring to a concrete shingle, (but I could easily be
wrong!) - how wide are these? In the UK we use just two nails to clip
them to the top of the batten - not eight. Our's are about 9 to 12" wide.

Once upon a time, all our roofing material used to come from N Wales -
slate, which made for a pleasing appearance. Sadly, today most are
concrete and bespoke homes are rooved with slate from China.


I think he's actually referring to asphalt shingles which are common in
many parts of the US. I don't know if that's also what the OP was
referring to or not.

We used to have slate roofs here as well; my grandparents' house (circa
1880) and barn had very pretty slate roofs. Sheetmetal roofs with
raised seams, both steel and copper, are common in very wind-prone areas
(enameled steel seems to be common in rural PA but some more upscale
houses like to use copper,) but asphalt is by far the most common over
here, and also the most likely to have bad shingles that need replacing
(they really only last 20-30 years at best.)

nate

--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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Default What to secure shingles with

Here's a good video on how to replace roof shingles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IiRi0DIUcnY

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Default What to secure shingles with

Big_Jake wrote:
On Sep 28, 4:29 pm, runsrealfast wrote:

I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one or
two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical shingles
that you find everywhere.

Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.

John



Galvanized Roofing Nails, 1 3/4" should be a good size.

JK

Hmmm,
Aluminum roofing nails?
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Default What to secure shingles with

On Sep 28, 4:25 pm, dicko wrote:
On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 14:29:38 -0700, runsrealfast

wrote:
I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one or
two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical shingles
that you find everywhere.


Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.


John


A 3-tab shingle is typically held in place with 8 nails, 2 nails above
each crack separating the tabs, 2 on each edge of the shingle, all in
a row, and then another 4 nails from the row immediately above it.


snip
-dickm


Nit picking here but it is poorly worded. I had to read it a couple
times and really think about the meaning (so I think slowly these
days). Better would be:

Each is held in place by 8 nails. 4 when nailing each shingle - one on
each edge, one above each cutout (slit) and the 4 from the next row
up.

Harry K



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Default What to secure shingles with

Nate Nagel wrote:
clot wrote:
dicko wrote:

On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 14:29:38 -0700, runsrealfast
wrote:

I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but,
what would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I
have one or two to replace before winter hits. They are just your
typical shingles that you find everywhere.

Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.

John


A 3-tab shingle is typically held in place with 8 nails, 2 nails
above each crack separating the tabs, 2 on each edge of the
shingle, all in a row, and then another 4 nails from the row
immediately above it. To remove the bad shingle you have to pop the
nails for the shingle itself and then the nails for the row above
it. The shingle should slide right out. That's assuming the tar
strip holding the rows together has already been broken when
removing the nails.

That means you have to bend up the row immediately above the
shingle being replaced and the row above that to remove and later
pound in the nails. This is tricky because old shingles are often
very brittle and you end up breaking the shingles you want to
remain in place. I just went thorugh this with my house and ended
up replacing far more than just the one bad shingle.

You'll need a very fine prybar to get under the nail heads to pop
them out. What works for me is an old flat screwdriver (my
general-purpose do-anything-but-dont-use-to-drive-screws
screwdriver) that I hook under the nail head and pry up on.

removing the nails also leaves holes in the remaining shingles so
you'll need a tube of roofing tar to seal the holes and also to dab
under the shingles to kind of glue them back down.



I'm surfing from the UK.

Words change their meaning travelling across The Pond. I guess "roof
shingles" now covers most types of "tiles". I've sadly deleted the
start to this thread and so do not know whether the OP referred to a
specific type of shingle.

I think you are referring to a concrete shingle, (but I could easily
be wrong!) - how wide are these? In the UK we use just two nails to
clip them to the top of the batten - not eight. Our's are about 9 to
12" wide.

Once upon a time, all our roofing material used to come from N Wales
- slate, which made for a pleasing appearance. Sadly, today most are
concrete and bespoke homes are rooved with slate from China.


I think he's actually referring to asphalt shingles which are common
in many parts of the US. I don't know if that's also what the OP was
referring to or not.

We used to have slate roofs here as well; my grandparents' house
(circa 1880) and barn had very pretty slate roofs. Sheetmetal roofs
with raised seams, both steel and copper, are common in very
wind-prone areas (enameled steel seems to be common in rural PA but
some more upscale houses like to use copper,) but asphalt is by far
the most common over here, and also the most likely to have bad
shingles that need replacing (they really only last 20-30 years at
best.)


Thanks for the information, Nate.
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On Sep 28, 9:05 pm, Tony Hwang wrote:
Big_Jake wrote:
On Sep 28, 4:29 pm, runsrealfast wrote:


I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one or
two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical shingles
that you find everywhere.


Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.


John


Galvanized Roofing Nails, 1 3/4" should be a good size.


JK


Hmmm,
Aluminum roofing nails?


NO - Galvanized Roofing Nails!

JK

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Default What to secure shingles with

On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 14:29:38 -0700, runsrealfast
wrote:

I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one or
two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical shingles
that you find everywhere.

Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.

John


A big wad of bubble gum........

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Default What to secure shingles with

On Sep 30, 1:23 am, wrote:
On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 14:29:38 -0700, runsrealfast

wrote:
I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one or
two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical shingles
that you find everywhere.


Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.


John


A big wad of bubble gum........


Sounds like a good Redneck fix...

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Default What to secure shingles with

On Sep 28, 6:22 pm, Nate Nagel wrote:
clot wrote:
dicko wrote:


On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 14:29:38 -0700, runsrealfast
wrote:


I'm sure I could get someone at HD or Lowes to tell me this but, what
would be used to secure shingles to the roof of a house. I have one
or two to replace before winter hits. They are just your typical
shingles that you find everywhere.


Sorry not a contractor so I don't know the technical names of the
shingles.


John


A 3-tab shingle is typically held in place with 8 nails, 2 nails above
each crack separating the tabs, 2 on each edge of the shingle, all in
a row, and then another 4 nails from the row immediately above it. To
remove the bad shingle you have to pop the nails for the shingle
itself and then the nails for the row above it. The shingle should
slide right out. That's assuming the tar strip holding the rows
together has already been broken when removing the nails.


That means you have to bend up the row immediately above the shingle
being replaced and the row above that to remove and later pound in the
nails. This is tricky because old shingles are often very brittle and
you end up breaking the shingles you want to remain in place. I just
went thorugh this with my house and ended up replacing far more than
just the one bad shingle.


You'll need a very fine prybar to get under the nail heads to pop them
out. What works for me is an old flat screwdriver (my general-purpose
do-anything-but-dont-use-to-drive-screws screwdriver) that I hook
under the nail head and pry up on.


removing the nails also leaves holes in the remaining shingles so
you'll need a tube of roofing tar to seal the holes and also to dab
under the shingles to kind of glue them back down.


I'm surfing from the UK.


Words change their meaning travelling across The Pond. I guess "roof
shingles" now covers most types of "tiles". I've sadly deleted the start
to this thread and so do not know whether the OP referred to a specific
type of shingle.


I think you are referring to a concrete shingle, (but I could easily be
wrong!) - how wide are these? In the UK we use just two nails to clip
them to the top of the batten - not eight. Our's are about 9 to 12" wide.


Once upon a time, all our roofing material used to come from N Wales -
slate, which made for a pleasing appearance. Sadly, today most are
concrete and bespoke homes are rooved with slate from China.


I think he's actually referring to asphalt shingles which are common in
many parts of the US. I don't know if that's also what the OP was
referring to or not.

We used to have slate roofs here as well; my grandparents' house (circa
1880) and barn had very pretty slate roofs. Sheetmetal roofs with
raised seams, both steel and copper, are common in very wind-prone areas
(enameled steel seems to be common in rural PA but some more upscale
houses like to use copper,) but asphalt is by far the most common over
here, and also the most likely to have bad shingles that need replacing
(they really only last 20-30 years at best.)

nate

--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.http://members.cox.net/njnagel


Yeah its the typical asphalt shingles.

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