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Old August 16th 07, 08:10 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Peeling Paint - door frame

Hi,

Have a case of peeling paint on the door frame. Looks fine, but if you
scrape it, even with a finger nail, it comes off quite easily. Was painted
before my time. There's a layer of paint, under the one that's peeling.

Suspect it's a case of latex on oil, without a primer. Removing the top
layer would be a mess. If I primed the top layer with say Kilz (or
similar), would the primer penetrate the latex and attach itself to the
layer below?

Do not know the age of the top layer, but could be 5 years.

TIA,

RichK



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Old August 16th 07, 08:35 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Peeling Paint - door frame

"RichK" wrote in message
...

Have a case of peeling paint on the door frame. Looks fine, but if you
scrape it, even with a finger nail, it comes off quite easily. Was

painted
before my time. There's a layer of paint, under the one that's peeling.

Suspect it's a case of latex on oil, without a primer. Removing the top
layer would be a mess. If I primed the top layer with say Kilz (or
similar), would the primer penetrate the latex and attach itself to the
layer below?


1. No, new primer is not likely to penetrate the
old colour coat and adhere to the old primer which
you do not know for sure to be there.

2. Your questiion is framed as if you were sure the
old colour coat flakes off leaving the old primer safely
adhering. This seems unlikely, unless both (2a) the
old primer was correctly applied and (2b) the old colour
coat was improperly applied (e.g. surface not washed
and sanded beforehand.)

You must decide between:
Method A = thorough preparation (scraping or blowtorch
to remove loose paint, then filling and sanding to prepare
a good surface; then quality paint, both primer and colour
coat.
Method B = touching up, perhaps in spots, while knowing
that if you guessed wrong in any one respect you will
have to go to Method A later.

--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)


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Old August 16th 07, 09:04 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Peeling Paint - door frame

On Aug 16, 2:10 pm, "RichK" wrote:
Hi,

Have a case of peeling paint on the door frame. Looks fine, but if you
scrape it, even with a finger nail, it comes off quite easily. Was painted
before my time. There's a layer of paint, under the one that's peeling.

Suspect it's a case of latex on oil, without a primer. Removing the top
layer would be a mess. If I primed the top layer with say Kilz (or
similar), would the primer penetrate the latex and attach itself to the
layer below?

Do not know the age of the top layer, but could be 5 years.

TIA,

RichK


If you can get it off with a fingernail then stripping it should be
easy, the new strippers are pretty gentle on your lungs and hands
compared to years ago. Then you could just prime/paint onto the good
layer. No, primer wont penetrate it and somehow re-attach the layer
below.


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Old August 16th 07, 09:12 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Peeling Paint - door frame

Guess you're suggesting a chemical stripper. Which should I use, since it
would be working on both layers, which are of different paint?

The top layer would be easy to remove mechanically, but messy. Well, no
paint is easy to remove :-) Bottom (I suspect oil) is very well attached to
the wood.

RichK

"RickH"

If you can get it off with a fingernail then stripping it should be
easy, the new strippers are pretty gentle on your lungs and hands
compared to years ago. Then you could just prime/paint onto the good
layer. No, primer wont penetrate it and somehow re-attach the layer
below.




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Old August 16th 07, 09:33 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Peeling Paint - door frame

On Aug 16, 3:12 pm, "RichK" wrote:
Guess you're suggesting a chemical stripper. Which should I use, since it
would be working on both layers, which are of different paint?

The top layer would be easy to remove mechanically, but messy. Well, no
paint is easy to remove :-) Bottom (I suspect oil) is very well attached to
the wood.

RichK

"RickH"



If you can get it off with a fingernail then stripping it should be
easy, the new strippers are pretty gentle on your lungs and hands
compared to years ago. Then you could just prime/paint onto the good
layer. No, primer wont penetrate it and somehow re-attach the layer
below.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


The one I used came in a green and white plastic bucket and was a gel
from HD. It was pretty pleasant to work with not like the old lye or
solvent strippers. You dont need to take it down to bare wood, just
that top layer. Scrape the stripped paint, a little wire brushing,
then apply the neutralizer, prime/paint when dry, it doesnt have to
look perfect just down to a sound surface. Somebody probably did just
slap some latex over an oil finish.




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Old August 16th 07, 10:52 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Art Art is offline
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Default Peeling Paint - door frame

Is it an outside door? Is the wood solid? If not you have an installation
problem (no flashing) and paint won't help.


"RichK" wrote in message
...
Hi,

Have a case of peeling paint on the door frame. Looks fine, but if you
scrape it, even with a finger nail, it comes off quite easily. Was
painted
before my time. There's a layer of paint, under the one that's peeling.

Suspect it's a case of latex on oil, without a primer. Removing the top
layer would be a mess. If I primed the top layer with say Kilz (or
similar), would the primer penetrate the latex and attach itself to the
layer below?

Do not know the age of the top layer, but could be 5 years.

TIA,

RichK




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Old August 17th 07, 12:20 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Peeling Paint - door frame


"Art" wrote in message

Is it an outside door? Is the wood solid? If not you have an

installation
problem (no flashing) and paint won't help.


It's an inside door. Wood is very solid. Paint was/is doing fine, unless
you accidentally scratch it. That's how I found out it would just come off.
In fact, I tested a few other doors and they are all the same :-(( The
doors themselves are not painted, just the frames and moldings.

RichK


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Old August 17th 07, 05:28 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Peeling Paint - door frame


"RichK" wrote in message
...
Hi,

Have a case of peeling paint on the door frame. Looks fine, but if you
scrape it, even with a finger nail, it comes off quite easily. Was

painted
before my time. There's a layer of paint, under the one that's peeling.

Suspect it's a case of latex on oil, without a primer. Removing the top
layer would be a mess. If I primed the top layer with say Kilz (or
similar), would the primer penetrate the latex and attach itself to the
layer below?

Do not know the age of the top layer, but could be 5 years.


Mess or not, you need to scrape off the peeling paint, prime with an
oil-based primer, and then repaint. Using a chemical stripper would be much
messier, time consuming, and a bit of an extreme measure; in other words,
that's a last resort.

If it's an exterior door jamb, use Cover Stain or an oil-based KILZ that
explicitly states that it is for use on exteriors -- original KILZ is not
designed for exterior use except for small touch-ups, and even then I'd use
Cover Stain.



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Old August 17th 07, 05:36 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Peeling Paint - door frame


"RickH" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Aug 16, 3:12 pm, "RichK" wrote:
Guess you're suggesting a chemical stripper. Which should I use, since

it
would be working on both layers, which are of different paint?

The top layer would be easy to remove mechanically, but messy. Well, no
paint is easy to remove :-) Bottom (I suspect oil) is very well

attached to
the wood.

RichK

"RickH"



If you can get it off with a fingernail then stripping it should be
easy, the new strippers are pretty gentle on your lungs and hands
compared to years ago. Then you could just prime/paint onto the good
layer. No, primer wont penetrate it and somehow re-attach the layer
below.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


The one I used came in a green and white plastic bucket and was a gel
from HD. It was pretty pleasant to work with not like the old lye or
solvent strippers. You dont need to take it down to bare wood, just
that top layer. Scrape the stripped paint, a little wire brushing,
then apply the neutralizer, prime/paint when dry, it doesnt have to
look perfect just down to a sound surface. Somebody probably did just
slap some latex over an oil finish.



You're talking about Citri-Strip or something like that. The problem with
those types of strippers is that they can take a LONG time to dry, meaning
the house could possibly be a disaster area for up to a week while trying to
strip all that stuff. Sometimes it's nice to have a stripper that
evaporates slowly, other times it can be a nuisance. Scrape, sand, prime,
and paint.



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Old August 17th 07, 01:44 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Peeling Paint - door frame


"TakenEvent" wrote in message

If it's an exterior door jamb, use Cover Stain or an oil-based KILZ that
explicitly states that it is for use on exteriors -- original KILZ is not
designed for exterior use except for small touch-ups, and even then I'd

use
Cover Stain.


I want to use latex paint. Is an oil-based KILZ the right primer in this
case?

RichK




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