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Old July 16th 07, 04:31 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default How often should an interior fuel oil tank be cleaned out?

mm wrote:
On Sun, 15 Jul 2007 21:04:37 -0400, George
wrote:

I know a few friends whose insurer required tanks to be replaced only
because of age. It also lessens further risk because all new interior
tanks are double wall.


But after one wall fails, eventually the other wall will too. So in
the long run, how is this better than single wall?


Coffee didn't kick in yet. A double wall is valuable because you can
periodically sample inside the second wall or install a alarm that will
sound if it detects something.

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Old July 16th 07, 04:34 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default How often should an interior fuel oil tank be cleaned out?

Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
"George" wrote in message
I know a few friends whose insurer required tanks to be replaced only
because of age. It also lessens further risk because all new interior
tanks are double wall.


I'd change insurers. They are welcome to come and inspect my tank, but I'll
be damned if I'm going to replace a perfectly good tank just because it hit
a certain age.

Our insurance company at work (as well as state law) requires we inspect our
air tanks every two years. It takes about 5 minutes to do an ultrasound on
one. Much cheaper that scrapping good material.



Certain local oil companies will no longer fill inside tanks unless you
have proof of age or a certificate from an inspector. They pay giant
premiums for spillage insurance and their insurers give them a discount
for doing this.
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Old July 16th 07, 04:36 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default How often should an interior fuel oil tank be cleaned out?

Pete C. wrote:
George wrote:
Pete C. wrote:
George wrote:
aemeijers wrote:

I can understand that on tanks exposed to weather or ground moisture, but a
basement tank? (Assuming a dry basement, of course.) As long as outside
shows no signs of rust, I'd think a borescope inspection of interior every
five years or so (I assume these things have a bunghole?) would be more than
adequate. I know the pickup tube isn't on the bottom, but as long as no rust
flakes are visible in the drained sludge, what are the odds of major
interior rustout with no outside evidence?

There can (and often is) moisture in a fuel oil tank. There are two
outcomes. One is the tank rusts. The other is microbes that grow in the
area between the oil and water and feast on the oil since oil is
slightly hygroscopic causing "goo" which blocks equipment.
And all the water in the tank will collect at the bottom to cause rust
there where it will do the most damage. Normally however a sudden
failure is pretty rare and pinhole leaks occur well before any
significant leak.

My buddy has a fuel oil company. He said the typical failure is that the
rusted tank blows while being filled.


That is indeed the typical catastrophic failure, caused by not
inspecting and noticing the pinhole leaks that were there for at least a
year or more prior.

(Having said that, any interior tank should of course have a spill berm
around it, or be sitting in one of those giant kitty litter pans.)

aem sends...


All (new/replacement) interior tanks have been double wall for some time.
Perhaps in your particular area, however you can readily purchase and
install a new 275 or 330 gal single wall steel tank in most areas.

Might be old inventory or something and of course there is a lot you can
do when no one is looking. According to my buddy there is some
requirement for new/replacement to be doublewall.


Again, probably a local requirement. MA perhaps?


No, my understanding is that it isn't local. We are in PA but according
to my friend it is a requirement in at least the NE and Mid-Atlantic states.
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Old July 16th 07, 08:09 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default How often should an interior fuel oil tank be cleaned out?

George wrote:

Pete C. wrote:
George wrote:
Pete C. wrote:
George wrote:
aemeijers wrote:

I can understand that on tanks exposed to weather or ground moisture, but a
basement tank? (Assuming a dry basement, of course.) As long as outside
shows no signs of rust, I'd think a borescope inspection of interior every
five years or so (I assume these things have a bunghole?) would be more than
adequate. I know the pickup tube isn't on the bottom, but as long as no rust
flakes are visible in the drained sludge, what are the odds of major
interior rustout with no outside evidence?

There can (and often is) moisture in a fuel oil tank. There are two
outcomes. One is the tank rusts. The other is microbes that grow in the
area between the oil and water and feast on the oil since oil is
slightly hygroscopic causing "goo" which blocks equipment.
And all the water in the tank will collect at the bottom to cause rust
there where it will do the most damage. Normally however a sudden
failure is pretty rare and pinhole leaks occur well before any
significant leak.
My buddy has a fuel oil company. He said the typical failure is that the
rusted tank blows while being filled.


That is indeed the typical catastrophic failure, caused by not
inspecting and noticing the pinhole leaks that were there for at least a
year or more prior.

(Having said that, any interior tank should of course have a spill berm
around it, or be sitting in one of those giant kitty litter pans.)

aem sends...


All (new/replacement) interior tanks have been double wall for some time.
Perhaps in your particular area, however you can readily purchase and
install a new 275 or 330 gal single wall steel tank in most areas.
Might be old inventory or something and of course there is a lot you can
do when no one is looking. According to my buddy there is some
requirement for new/replacement to be doublewall.


Again, probably a local requirement. MA perhaps?


No, my understanding is that it isn't local. We are in PA but according
to my friend it is a requirement in at least the NE and Mid-Atlantic states.


Dunno, I know I saw regular single wall 275 and 330 tanks for sale in CT
within the last couple years.
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Old July 16th 07, 08:18 PM posted to alt.home.repair
dpb dpb is offline
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Default How often should an interior fuel oil tank be cleaned out?

George wrote:
....

No, my understanding is that it isn't local. We are in PA but according
to my friend it is a requirement in at least the NE and Mid-Atlantic
states.


http://www.epa.gov/OUST/faqs/heatoil.htm

Tanks used for the storage of heating oil for consumptive use on the
premises where stored are excluded from federal UST regulations.
However, state or territorial regulatory agencies may regulate these
tanks. You can view a map showing which states regulate these tanks..."

http://www.epa.gov/OUST/graphics/heatoil1.gif

PA actually isn't on the map (but it notes it's not kept completely up
to date)...

--



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Old July 16th 07, 09:03 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default How often should an interior fuel oil tank be cleaned out?

On Mon, 16 Jul 2007 12:16:06 GMT, "David Martel"
wrote:

George,

I don't doubt that there is some moisture in heating oil. Even if there
isn't moisture will still get into the tank. In cars there are products
known as Dry Gas that will solubilize and remove this water in the gas tank.


In the 60's one major oil company advertised that it included
something like this in the gasoline. I think even at that time, all
the major gas companies did so, and by not long after I think all the
independants did too.

But Dry Gas is still useful when there is more than the normal amount
of water in the gas tank.

Doesn't the heating industry have something like this?


I haven't heard about it.

Dave M.


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Old July 16th 07, 09:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
mm mm is offline
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Default How often should an interior fuel oil tank be cleaned out?

On Mon, 16 Jul 2007 12:16:06 GMT, "David Martel"
wrote:

George,

I don't doubt that there is some moisture in heating oil. Even if there
isn't moisture will still get into the tank. In cars there are products
known as Dry Gas that will solubilize and remove this water in the gas tank.
Doesn't the heating industry have something like this?


I haven't heard about it.

Ooops. I got confused by my own post. I havent heard about it being
already included in the fuel oil when you buy it, but i'm not
surprised the sell it separately.


Dave M.



Dave M.


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Old July 16th 07, 09:42 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default How often should an interior fuel oil tank be cleaned out?

mm wrote:
....
But Dry Gas is still useful ...

....

Which is basically, just alcohol in which water is soluble. One
advantage of ethanol...

--
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Old July 17th 07, 02:01 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default How often should an interior fuel oil tank be cleaned out?

On Mon, 16 Jul 2007 11:31:17 -0400, George
wrote:

mm wrote:
On Sun, 15 Jul 2007 21:04:37 -0400, George
wrote:

I know a few friends whose insurer required tanks to be replaced only
because of age. It also lessens further risk because all new interior
tanks are double wall.


But after one wall fails, eventually the other wall will too. So in
the long run, how is this better than single wall?


Coffee didn't kick in yet. A double wall is valuable because you can
periodically sample inside the second wall or install a alarm that will
sound if it detects something.


Ah. Ok. Thanks.


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