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Default Senility check - Garden shed foundation

I was sure I'd asked this question a few months back, but I searched and
could not find the original post.

I want to put up a pump house with water wheel for a small pond. I plan on
renting a 'Little Beaver' to dig the holes for my supports. I also want to
put up a small garden shed. So I was thinking of digging some holes, filling
them with compacted gravel and putting foundation blocks on the gravel to
support the shed. I'll probably dig the holes about 3' deep for both the
shed and the pump house. The shed will have nothing but gravel in the holes
and the pump house holes will be started with gravel and then enough
concrete to hold the posts in place.

The frost line is about three feet down, although with the warmer weather
heaving seems to be less of a concern. It just seems that a concrete slab is
overkill for a small (10x8) garden shed?



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Default Senility check - Garden shed foundation


"Bill Stock" wrote in message
...
I was sure I'd asked this question a few months back, but I searched and
could not find the original post.

I want to put up a pump house with water wheel for a small pond. I plan on
renting a 'Little Beaver' to dig the holes for my supports. I also want to
put up a small garden shed. So I was thinking of digging some holes,
filling them with compacted gravel and putting foundation blocks on the
gravel to support the shed. I'll probably dig the holes about 3' deep for
both the shed and the pump house. The shed will have nothing but gravel in
the holes and the pump house holes will be started with gravel and then
enough concrete to hold the posts in place.

The frost line is about three feet down, although with the warmer weather
heaving seems to be less of a concern. It just seems that a concrete slab
is overkill for a small (10x8) garden shed?

If you're going to that much work anyway, why not just use sonotubes and put
down proper piers with anchor bolts on the top for clips to hold the floor
system of the shed?

aem sends...


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Default Senility check - Garden shed foundation


"aemeijers" wrote in message
...

"Bill Stock" wrote in message
...
I was sure I'd asked this question a few months back, but I searched and
could not find the original post.

I want to put up a pump house with water wheel for a small pond. I plan
on renting a 'Little Beaver' to dig the holes for my supports. I also
want to put up a small garden shed. So I was thinking of digging some
holes, filling them with compacted gravel and putting foundation blocks
on the gravel to support the shed. I'll probably dig the holes about 3'
deep for both the shed and the pump house. The shed will have nothing but
gravel in the holes and the pump house holes will be started with gravel
and then enough concrete to hold the posts in place.

The frost line is about three feet down, although with the warmer weather
heaving seems to be less of a concern. It just seems that a concrete slab
is overkill for a small (10x8) garden shed?

If you're going to that much work anyway, why not just use sonotubes and
put down proper piers with anchor bolts on the top for clips to hold the
floor system of the shed?

aem sends...


I was hoping not to rent a cement mixer.

I estimate the shed will need 9 piers. Whereas the pump house is only
getting four. Mixing cement for four posts by hand will be bad enough.



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Default Senility check - Garden shed foundation

On Apr 18, 7:50 pm, "Bill Stock" wrote:
I was sure I'd asked this question a few months back, but I searched and
could not find the original post.

I want to put up a pump house with water wheel for a small pond. I plan on
renting a 'Little Beaver' to dig the holes for my supports. I also want to
put up a small garden shed. So I was thinking of digging some holes, filling
them with compacted gravel and putting foundation blocks on the gravel to
support the shed. I'll probably dig the holes about 3' deep for both the
shed and the pump house. The shed will have nothing but gravel in the holes
and the pump house holes will be started with gravel and then enough
concrete to hold the posts in place.

The frost line is about three feet down, although with the warmer weather
heaving seems to be less of a concern. It just seems that a concrete slab is
overkill for a small (10x8) garden shed?


Your plan is a sound one though I agree that piers would be better.

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Default Senility check - Garden shed foundation

Bill Stock wrote:
I was sure I'd asked this question a few months back, but I searched and
could not find the original post.

I want to put up a pump house with water wheel for a small pond. I plan on
renting a 'Little Beaver' to dig the holes for my supports. I also want to
put up a small garden shed. So I was thinking of digging some holes, filling
them with compacted gravel and putting foundation blocks on the gravel to
support the shed. I'll probably dig the holes about 3' deep for both the
shed and the pump house. The shed will have nothing but gravel in the holes
and the pump house holes will be started with gravel and then enough
concrete to hold the posts in place.

The frost line is about three feet down, although with the warmer weather
heaving seems to be less of a concern. It just seems that a concrete slab is
overkill for a small (10x8) garden shed?


My 12' x 16' pool cabana (nee garden shed) with hot and cold water and
waste drain has no foundation whatsoever. The 2" x 8" PT floor joists
are sitting on a bed of gravel. In the winter, after the water is shut
off and drained, it serves as a storage shed for the pool and other
summer amenities. It's been there for about 18 years.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY


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Default Senility check - Garden shed foundation


"willshak" wrote in message
...
Bill Stock wrote:
I was sure I'd asked this question a few months back, but I searched and
could not find the original post.

I want to put up a pump house with water wheel for a small pond. I plan
on renting a 'Little Beaver' to dig the holes for my supports. I also
want to put up a small garden shed. So I was thinking of digging some
holes, filling them with compacted gravel and putting foundation blocks
on the gravel to support the shed. I'll probably dig the holes about 3'
deep for both the shed and the pump house. The shed will have nothing but
gravel in the holes and the pump house holes will be started with gravel
and then enough concrete to hold the posts in place.

The frost line is about three feet down, although with the warmer weather
heaving seems to be less of a concern. It just seems that a concrete slab
is overkill for a small (10x8) garden shed?


My 12' x 16' pool cabana (nee garden shed) with hot and cold water and
waste drain has no foundation whatsoever. The 2" x 8" PT floor joists are
sitting on a bed of gravel. In the winter, after the water is shut off and
drained, it serves as a storage shed for the pool and other summer
amenities. It's been there for about 18 years.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY


Thanks,

The shed will be somewhat close to a spruce tree, so I'm hoping the post
holes will disturb the roots less than a complete excavation.



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Default Senility check - Garden shed foundation

On Apr 18, 10:06 pm, "Bill Stock" wrote:
"willshak" wrote in message

...





Bill Stock wrote:
I was sure I'd asked this question a few months back, but I searched and
could not find the original post.


I want to put up a pump house with water wheel for a small pond. I plan
on renting a 'Little Beaver' to dig the holes for my supports. I also
want to put up a small garden shed. So I was thinking of digging some
holes, filling them with compacted gravel and putting foundation blocks
on the gravel to support the shed. I'll probably dig the holes about 3'
deep for both the shed and the pump house. The shed will have nothing but
gravel in the holes and the pump house holes will be started with gravel
and then enough concrete to hold the posts in place.


The frost line is about three feet down, although with the warmer weather
heaving seems to be less of a concern. It just seems that a concrete slab
is overkill for a small (10x8) garden shed?


My 12' x 16' pool cabana (nee garden shed) with hot and cold water and
waste drain has no foundation whatsoever. The 2" x 8" PT floor joists are
sitting on a bed of gravel. In the winter, after the water is shut off and
drained, it serves as a storage shed for the pool and other summer
amenities. It's been there for about 18 years.


--


Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY


Thanks,

The shed will be somewhat close to a spruce tree, so I'm hoping the post
holes will disturb the roots less than a complete excavation.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


That's good thinking. A mature tree is impossible to replace if
damaged. Are there many trees of this type on your place? Any type
of foundation is OK for a shed if you are at risk for damaging an
irreplaceable tree. If you have a lot of spruce on your place them
you can worry less, I suppose.

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Default Senility check - Garden shed foundation


"Lawrence" wrote in message
oups.com...

The shed will be somewhat close to a spruce tree, so I'm hoping the post
holes will disturb the roots less than a complete excavation.- Hide
quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


That's good thinking. A mature tree is impossible to replace if
damaged. Are there many trees of this type on your place? Any type
of foundation is OK for a shed if you are at risk for damaging an
irreplaceable tree. If you have a lot of spruce on your place them
you can worry less, I suppose.


Yes trees are a fair age, four spruce trees about 30'. Although They've been
dying from the indeide out. I'm not sure if it's because they were planted
too close together or if they are suffering from the dry spell a couple of
years ago.

I'm considering getting the piers poured, as it's only $20 a pop with
digging and cement. Although I'm not sure how the saddles work, since the
posts will be horizontal (floor) as opposed to vertical like deck posts?
Bummer is that the tractor (54") won't fit through the gate.



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Default Senility check - Garden shed foundation


"Bill Stock" wrote in message
...

"Lawrence" wrote in message
oups.com...

The shed will be somewhat close to a spruce tree, so I'm hoping the post
holes will disturb the roots less than a complete excavation.- Hide
quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


That's good thinking. A mature tree is impossible to replace if
damaged. Are there many trees of this type on your place? Any type
of foundation is OK for a shed if you are at risk for damaging an
irreplaceable tree. If you have a lot of spruce on your place them
you can worry less, I suppose.


Yes trees are a fair age, four spruce trees about 30'. Although They've
been dying from the indeide out. I'm not sure if it's because they were
planted too close together or if they are suffering from the dry spell a
couple of years ago.

I'm considering getting the piers poured, as it's only $20 a pop with
digging and cement. Although I'm not sure how the saddles work, since the
posts will be horizontal (floor) as opposed to vertical like deck posts?
Bummer is that the tractor (54") won't fit through the gate.

If it is a tractor-mounted auger, it can be used to pull and replace one of
the gate fenceposts to make the hole wider, either temporarily or
permanently. Is there a section of fence you can take down for the day?
:^/

There are many different types of saddles available. The deck aisle will
have the ones to hold joists. Usual practice is to put a J-bolt in the
pier, centered, and then add the saddle afterward. Layout is pretty
critical. You'll wanna put up stakes and batten boards, and after the holes
are dug, put crossed strings over at least the corner pier centers, and
marks over the center points of the in-line piers. A plumb bob will show
where to put the J-bolt in. It doesn't have to be perfect, since there will
lots of oval holes, but it needs to be pretty close. The usual procedures of
making the diagonal measurements match will let you square up the string
'box' pretty accurately. Unless the concrete guy will guarantee he can match
a layout diagram, you want to be there when they pour. If they are using the
cones and tubes, the strings can also be used for placing those accurately.

aem sends....


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