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Default Changing a light switch

I have a standard light switch in my bathroon I'd like to replace.
The new swich I bought is a switch and an outlet all in one, switch on
top half outlet on bottom half..

Can someone please explain how to hook this up.

Current I have black/black in and out of the old switch and the green/
bare wire. The white wire it capped off in the back not connected to
anything.

Thanks for your assitance,
Felix

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Default Changing a light switch

On Feb 24, 3:01 pm, wrote:
I have a standard light switch in my bathroon I'd like to replace.
The new swich I bought is a switch and an outlet all in one, switch on
top half outlet on bottom half..

Can someone please explain how to hook this up.

Current I have black/black in and out of the old switch and the green/
bare wire. The white wire it capped off in the back not connected to
anything.

Thanks for your assitance,
Felix


BTW, here is a link to the product:
http://www.electricsupplyonline.com/...cc_w026291.php

Thanks again

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Default Changing a light switch

Disconnect the wires from the existing switch, determine which one is the
live wire. Once you know this, connect the live wire to the side of the
combination switch-outlet that has only two brass screws with a bridge
connecting them together. The other black wire, which is the load wire, goes
to the brass screw on the opposite side of the switch. You now need to run a
white wire from the silver screw on the outlet to the two white wires
connected together with a wire nut. Install your ground wire to the green
screw and you're done. I will caution you that by current NEC , all bathroom
outlets are supposed to be GFCI protected. They do manufacture combination
switch-gfci outlets as well



wrote in message
oups.com...
I have a standard light switch in my bathroon I'd like to replace.
The new swich I bought is a switch and an outlet all in one, switch on
top half outlet on bottom half..

Can someone please explain how to hook this up.

Current I have black/black in and out of the old switch and the green/
bare wire. The white wire it capped off in the back not connected to
anything.

Thanks for your assitance,
Felix



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Default Changing a light switch

Reader assumes any risk from use of this advice.

You probably have a device where there is a feed on one side with two
screws but there is a connecting link so that one feed can serve both the
outlet and the switch. On the other side there is a connection for the
neutral as well as for the power leaving the switch going to the light.
There will also be a ground connection at the end or corner and probably
tinted green.

Naturally you will have turned the power off before doing this. The
incoming black power line goes to one of the screws on the feed side (brass
colored). The black wire leading to the light goes on the opposite side of
the sitch part (probably also colored brass). The white neutral wire
should be uncapped, end stripped if not already so, and connected to the
silver colored screw next to the outlet but opposite the feed side. Green
ground wire goes to the green screw. Take care in connecting the wires--if
solid wire you can pre-form the hook shape that goes around the screw and
then squeeze it to a smaller shape with needle-nosed pliers before
tightening down the screw. Wires should go around the screw clockwise.
Tighten firmly but not so much as you strip the screw threads. It's a good
idea to wrap electrical tape around the body of the device so the screws
are covered over. Before pushing it back into the junction box you can
carefully test it by turning the power back on and make sure the switch
works (and the breaker doesn't trip). Turn the power off while you
carefully push the device back into the box, screw it down, and put the
cover plate on.


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Default Changing a light switch


wrote in message
oups.com...
I have a standard light switch in my bathroon I'd like to replace.
The new swich I bought is a switch and an outlet all in one, switch on
top half outlet on bottom half..

Can someone please explain how to hook this up.

Current I have black/black in and out of the old switch and the green/
bare wire. The white wire it capped off in the back not connected to
anything.

Thanks for your assitance,
Felix

With a voltage detector, determine which of the black wires is hot. Attach
that to pigtails going to the two brass screws (if the switch and outlet
are connected already, you can just attach the hot to a brass screw; no
pigtail necessary). Attach the other black wire to the white screw on the
switch. The switch is set.
Attach the white wire to the white screw on the outlet. Where-ever the
other end of the white wire is, presumably at a light, attach it to the
other white wires. You should be good to go on the outlet.
If you don't follow me, you had better hire an electrician.


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Default Changing a light switch

The code in force at the time his house was built may not have required the
GFCI, therefore he's not required to put on there upon replacement.

For that matter, whose to know anyway? (regardless of when it was built)

--
Steve Barker




"RBM" rbm2(remove wrote in message
...
Disconnect the wires from the existing switch, determine which one is the
live wire. Once you know this, connect the live wire to the side of the
combination switch-outlet that has only two brass screws with a bridge
connecting them together. The other black wire, which is the load wire,
goes to the brass screw on the opposite side of the switch. You now need
to run a white wire from the silver screw on the outlet to the two white
wires connected together with a wire nut. Install your ground wire to the
green screw and you're done. I will caution you that by current NEC , all
bathroom outlets are supposed to be GFCI protected. They do manufacture
combination switch-gfci outlets as well





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Default Changing a light switch

He's not replacing an outlet. He's installing an outlet in a bathroom where
one didn't exist. I believe under those circumstances he'd be required to
use a GFCI



"Steve Barker" wrote in message
...
The code in force at the time his house was built may not have required
the GFCI, therefore he's not required to put on there upon replacement.

For that matter, whose to know anyway? (regardless of when it was built)

--
Steve Barker




"RBM" rbm2(remove wrote in message
...
Disconnect the wires from the existing switch, determine which one is the
live wire. Once you know this, connect the live wire to the side of the
combination switch-outlet that has only two brass screws with a bridge
connecting them together. The other black wire, which is the load wire,
goes to the brass screw on the opposite side of the switch. You now need
to run a white wire from the silver screw on the outlet to the two white
wires connected together with a wire nut. Install your ground wire to the
green screw and you're done. I will caution you that by current NEC , all
bathroom outlets are supposed to be GFCI protected. They do manufacture
combination switch-gfci outlets as well







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Default Changing a light switch

I don't follow you, and I am an electrician!!! If he connects it as you
describe, with the black "load" wire connected to a white screw, he'll have
a dead short when he flips the breaker back on



"Toller" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
oups.com...
I have a standard light switch in my bathroon I'd like to replace.
The new swich I bought is a switch and an outlet all in one, switch on
top half outlet on bottom half..

Can someone please explain how to hook this up.

Current I have black/black in and out of the old switch and the green/
bare wire. The white wire it capped off in the back not connected to
anything.

Thanks for your assitance,
Felix

With a voltage detector, determine which of the black wires is hot.
Attach that to pigtails going to the two brass screws (if the switch and
outlet are connected already, you can just attach the hot to a brass
screw; no pigtail necessary). Attach the other black wire to the white
screw on the switch. The switch is set.
Attach the white wire to the white screw on the outlet. Where-ever the
other end of the white wire is, presumably at a light, attach it to the
other white wires. You should be good to go on the outlet.
If you don't follow me, you had better hire an electrician.



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Default Changing a light switch

Steve Barker wrote:
The code in force at the time his house was built may not have required the
GFCI, therefore he's not required to put on there upon replacement.

For that matter, whose to know anyway? (regardless of when it was built)


You can get a switch/outlet like he is suggesting with a GFCI.
Personally I think a GFCI in the bathroom is a good idea.

I know some code items you are required to follow whenever you replace a
device, like if you have a grounded box and are replacing an old 2-prong
receptacle, you are REQUIRED to use a grounded outlet. Not sure if that
is true of the GFCI receptacle, but it certainly is a good idea.

nate

--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel


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Default Changing a light switch

He said white (silver) screw on the SWITCH. I'm following him but I
didn't think that switches generally used silver screws for anything,
usually line and load are both brass IME. So hot black to "line" dead
black to "load" (which are probably both brass) then white to the silver
screw on the recep. and pigtail the green screw with a bare wire to the
existing ground wires.

nate

RBM wrote:
I don't follow you, and I am an electrician!!! If he connects it as you
describe, with the black "load" wire connected to a white screw, he'll have
a dead short when he flips the breaker back on



"Toller" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
groups.com...

I have a standard light switch in my bathroon I'd like to replace.
The new swich I bought is a switch and an outlet all in one, switch on
top half outlet on bottom half..

Can someone please explain how to hook this up.

Current I have black/black in and out of the old switch and the green/
bare wire. The white wire it capped off in the back not connected to
anything.

Thanks for your assitance,
Felix


With a voltage detector, determine which of the black wires is hot.
Attach that to pigtails going to the two brass screws (if the switch and
outlet are connected already, you can just attach the hot to a brass
screw; no pigtail necessary). Attach the other black wire to the white
screw on the switch. The switch is set.
Attach the white wire to the white screw on the outlet. Where-ever the
other end of the white wire is, presumably at a light, attach it to the
other white wires. You should be good to go on the outlet.
If you don't follow me, you had better hire an electrician.






--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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Default Changing a light switch

Correct N8, the only silver screw should be adjacent to the outlet part of
the device, for the neutral. Toller knows this, he just had a momentary
lapse of reason



"Nate Nagel" wrote in message
...
He said white (silver) screw on the SWITCH. I'm following him but I
didn't think that switches generally used silver screws for anything,
usually line and load are both brass IME. So hot black to "line" dead
black to "load" (which are probably both brass) then white to the silver
screw on the recep. and pigtail the green screw with a bare wire to the
existing ground wires.

nate

RBM wrote:
I don't follow you, and I am an electrician!!! If he connects it as you
describe, with the black "load" wire connected to a white screw, he'll
have a dead short when he flips the breaker back on



"Toller" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
egroups.com...

I have a standard light switch in my bathroon I'd like to replace.
The new swich I bought is a switch and an outlet all in one, switch on
top half outlet on bottom half..

Can someone please explain how to hook this up.

Current I have black/black in and out of the old switch and the green/
bare wire. The white wire it capped off in the back not connected to
anything.

Thanks for your assitance,
Felix


With a voltage detector, determine which of the black wires is hot.
Attach that to pigtails going to the two brass screws (if the switch and
outlet are connected already, you can just attach the hot to a brass
screw; no pigtail necessary). Attach the other black wire to the white
screw on the switch. The switch is set.
Attach the white wire to the white screw on the outlet. Where-ever the
other end of the white wire is, presumably at a light, attach it to the
other white wires. You should be good to go on the outlet.
If you don't follow me, you had better hire an electrician.






--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel



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Default Changing a light switch

On Feb 25, 1:01 pm, "RBM" rbm2(remove wrote:
Any new installation or any replacement receptacle in a bathroom would have
to be GFCI protected

"Doug Miller" wrote in message

.net...



In article ,
says...
wrote:
I have a standard light switch in my bathroon I'd like to replace.
The new swich I bought is a switch and an outlet all in one, switch on
top half outlet on bottom half..


Can someone please explain how to hook this up.


Current I have black/black in and out of the old switch and the
green/ bare wire. The white wire it capped off in the back not
connected to anything.


Thanks for your assitance,
Felix


Step # 1 Make sure that that circuit is on a GFI. If not likely
adding an outlet like that (which I believe are not available in GFI)
would
be a code violation .


why would that be a code violation?- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


Wow, I did not expect so many different posts, but thank you.

After looking at the situation I have a GFI outlet right next to this
new switch/outlet, so after failing to think about it at 1st, I just
supplied to new outlet with a black & white wire from the exsisting
GFI, this making the new outlet a GFI.

Thanks again to all, it was from reading all the post I thought this
would be the easiest way.

Felix

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Default Changing a light switch

wrote:
On Feb 25, 1:01 pm, "RBM" rbm2(remove wrote:

Any new installation or any replacement receptacle in a bathroom would have
to be GFCI protected

"Doug Miller" wrote in message

al.net...




In article ,
says...

wrote:

I have a standard light switch in my bathroon I'd like to replace.
The new swich I bought is a switch and an outlet all in one, switch on
top half outlet on bottom half..


Can someone please explain how to hook this up.


Current I have black/black in and out of the old switch and the
green/ bare wire. The white wire it capped off in the back not
connected to anything.


Thanks for your assitance,
Felix


Step # 1 Make sure that that circuit is on a GFI. If not likely
adding an outlet like that (which I believe are not available in GFI)
would
be a code violation .


why would that be a code violation?- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -



Wow, I did not expect so many different posts, but thank you.

After looking at the situation I have a GFI outlet right next to this
new switch/outlet, so after failing to think about it at 1st, I just
supplied to new outlet with a black & white wire from the exsisting
GFI, this making the new outlet a GFI.

Thanks again to all, it was from reading all the post I thought this
would be the easiest way.

Felix


Ah, makes sense. So you connected the feed to the new recep. from the
"Load" side of the existing GFCI outlet? that'll work.

If there is a recep. in your light fixture (some have them) I would
recommend feeding the switch from the GFCI as well, just in case someone
uses it.

nate

--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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Default Changing a light switch

On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 15:05:17 -0500, Nate Nagel
wrote:

wrote:
On Feb 25, 1:01 pm, "RBM" rbm2(remove wrote:

Any new installation or any replacement receptacle in a bathroom would have
to be GFCI protected

"Doug Miller" wrote in message

bal.net...




In article ,
says...

wrote:

I have a standard light switch in my bathroon I'd like to replace.
The new swich I bought is a switch and an outlet all in one, switch on
top half outlet on bottom half..

Can someone please explain how to hook this up.

Current I have black/black in and out of the old switch and the
green/ bare wire. The white wire it capped off in the back not
connected to anything.

Thanks for your assitance,
Felix

Step # 1 Make sure that that circuit is on a GFI. If not likely
adding an outlet like that (which I believe are not available in GFI)
would
be a code violation .

why would that be a code violation?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -



Wow, I did not expect so many different posts, but thank you.

After looking at the situation I have a GFI outlet right next to this
new switch/outlet, so after failing to think about it at 1st, I just
supplied to new outlet with a black & white wire from the exsisting
GFI, this making the new outlet a GFI.

Thanks again to all, it was from reading all the post I thought this
would be the easiest way.

Felix


Ah, makes sense. So you connected the feed to the new recep. from the
"Load" side of the existing GFCI outlet? that'll work.

If there is a recep. in your light fixture (some have them) I would
recommend feeding the switch from the GFCI as well, just in case someone
uses it.


Or disconnect the receptacle, and don't use a GFCI for it. Then, if
the GFCI trips you won't be in the dark.

nate

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"Unlike biological evolution. 'intelligent design' is
not a genuine scientific theory and, therefore, has
no place in the curriculum of our nation's public
school classes." -- Ted Kennedy
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