Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old January 26th 07, 12:40 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 330
Default "Patching" water damaged cabinets

We have two rental units that have cheap kitchen base cabinets which are
basically made from "particle board." Since kitchens "stuff" leaks from
time to time, the bases have all gotten wet and the particle board is
literally falling apart.

For various reasons I want to fit this "in situ." (The main reasons are
cost and the fact that we don't want to have to mess with the plumbing more
than necessary.)

Any hints? I would appreciate the benefit of the experience of anyone else
who has had this type of problem and how he managed.

Thanks in advance.



  #2   Report Post  
Old January 26th 07, 03:32 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 467
Default "Patching" water damaged cabinets

Exactly what does "in situ" mean?

And in the future only buy all wood cabinets. I don't think you can
fix particleboard. You can re-veneer them, but that's actually more
expensive than putting in a replacement piece of plywood, and doesn't
fix the underlying wood. I am not sure if you can fix it in place but
it may be possible to hack out the crappy particleboard, then somehow
fasten in a piece of plywood, then stain and varnish it. The problem
with that is that you are still trying to attach a piece of good wood
to other crappy particleboard. It might be possible to forget about
mounting it in and make the replacement piece more like a pedistol
(spelling"?) and just set it in place.

  #3   Report Post  
Old January 26th 07, 03:53 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 330
Default "Patching" water damaged cabinets


wrote in message
ups.com...
Exactly what does "in situ" mean?


In place. Generally, I don't want to have to take them from where they are
to repair.


And in the future only buy all wood cabinets. I don't think you can
fix particleboard. You can re-veneer them, but that's actually more
expensive than putting in a replacement piece of plywood, and doesn't
fix the underlying wood. I am not sure if you can fix it in place but
it may be possible to hack out the crappy particleboard, then somehow
fasten in a piece of plywood, then stain and varnish it. The problem
with that is that you are still trying to attach a piece of good wood
to other crappy particleboard. It might be possible to forget about
mounting it in and make the replacement piece more like a pedistol
(spelling"?) and just set it in place.


I could not agree with you more about only having "real wood" in the house.

With the possible exception of "Tempered Masonite" I would not use any kind
of "pressed wood" product. You can get water in any room of the house from
such things as a "forgotten" carpet "steamer" to an overwatered plant.

But my immediate problem remains: I want to get two kitchens back to
"rental" condition without springing for a complete re-model.

In my case, the "faces" of the cabinets are all "real" wood. But the kick
boards and the usually hidden sides are the junk stuff.




  #4   Report Post  
Old January 26th 07, 04:12 PM posted to alt.home.repair
tom tom is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 589
Default "Patching" water damaged cabinets



On Jan 26, 3:40 am, "John Gilmer" wrote:
We have two rental units that have cheap kitchen base cabinets which are
basically made from "particle board." Since kitchens "stuff" leaks from
time to time, the bases have all gotten wet and the particle board is
literally falling apart.

For various reasons I want to fit this "in situ." (The main reasons are
cost and the fact that we don't want to have to mess with the plumbing more
than necessary.)

Any hints? I would appreciate the benefit of the experience of anyone else
who has had this type of problem and how he managed.

Thanks in advance. I've the exact same situation, remedied by building a supporting grid of half-lapped material, and laying a 1/8 or 1/4 inch moisture resistant skin over the top. Usually you've got to cut the new floor in two in order to get it into the cabinet. Lay a bead of glue down, install the new floor, and nail in place. HTH. Tom


  #5   Report Post  
Old January 26th 07, 04:13 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 6,201
Default "Patching" water damaged cabinets

it will be less work to just replace the cabinents and a nicer job,
attractive to next tenant.

lowes has kraftmaids cabinents cheap and very nice

fixing them in place if they are truly bad is too much hassle



  #6   Report Post  
Old January 26th 07, 04:26 PM posted to alt.home.repair
tom tom is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 589
Default "Patching" water damaged cabinets



On Jan 26, 7:12 am, "tom" wrote:













I've the exact same situation, remedied by building a
supporting grid of half-lapped material, and laying a 1/8 or 1/4 inch
moisture resistant skin over the top. Usually you've got to cut the new
floor in two in order to get it into the cabinet. Lay a bead of glue
down, install the new floor, and nail in place. HTH. Tom



Actually I meant cross-lapped. Tom

  #7   Report Post  
Old January 27th 07, 12:54 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,578
Default "Patching" water damaged cabinets

John Gilmer wrote:
We have two rental units that have cheap kitchen base cabinets which are
basically made from "particle board." Since kitchens "stuff" leaks from
time to time, the bases have all gotten wet and the particle board is
literally falling apart.

For various reasons I want to fit this "in situ." (The main reasons are
cost and the fact that we don't want to have to mess with the plumbing more
than necessary.)

Any hints? I would appreciate the benefit of the experience of anyone else
who has had this type of problem and how he managed.

Thanks in advance.



More information, please. How many cabinets, how extensive is the
damage? Particle board covered with ..... paint? printed finish? formica?

I have done minor repairs - a very small area - by digging out the loose
particles and filling in with wood filler. If the damage is just a spot
here and there, and not visible, just leave it and make sure the
plumbing is in good shape.

Basic, no frills cabinets can be had for not much money. If you are
renting a dump, just rip them out and let the renters bring their own.
If rent income doesn't cover maintenance, fix it and raise the rent.
  #8   Report Post  
Old January 28th 07, 12:56 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 330
Default "Patching" water damaged cabinets


wrote in message
ups.com...
it will be less work to just replace the cabinents and a nicer job,
attractive to next tenant.

lowes has kraftmaids cabinents cheap and very nice

fixing them in place if they are truly bad is too much hassle


Except that: 1) I have to disconnect the plumbing; and 2) I have to take
off the counter tops.



  #9   Report Post  
Old January 28th 07, 02:48 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2006
Posts: 68
Default "Patching" water damaged cabinets


"John Gilmer" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
ups.com...
it will be less work to just replace the cabinents and a nicer job,
attractive to next tenant.

lowes has kraftmaids cabinents cheap and very nice

fixing them in place if they are truly bad is too much hassle


Except that: 1) I have to disconnect the plumbing; and 2) I have to take
off the counter tops.




If you are good with a sawzall, jig saw or circular saw you can cut out the
base and rebuild with " plywood. You would have to support the upper part
of the cabinet of course. With careful cutting you can cut out the shelf
(the tenant wouldn't need that, they can just set their stuff on the
subfloor). Six or eight mending straps or joist connecting straps would
finish it nice. (imagine some of the conversation your tenant is going to
have with his friends). G

Honestly, the best approach is to replace the cabinet carcase with the same
manufacture or something close. The plumbing is easily avoided and you
usually can loosen the countertop enough to slide cabinets, dishwashers etc
in place.

Bill




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My details on "no spin" Kenmore or Whirlpool "Motor Coupling" upgrades, and washer repair. [email protected] Home Repair 6 January 3rd 09 08:36 AM
Patching "sleeve" in exterior wall? N8N Home Repair 6 January 12th 07 12:27 PM
New Book: "Mad Caps, Keef, Khat"-"Legal and shades of gray" Mad Caps Home Repair 1 December 2nd 06 03:09 PM
Gladiator "Cadet" series garage cabinets vs the real Gladiator LJ Home Ownership 1 October 22nd 06 03:57 PM
Orange Peel Texture? "Knockdown" or "Skip Trowel" also "California Knock-down" HotRod Home Repair 6 September 28th 06 02:48 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:28 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017