Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 180
Default Concrete question (regarding previous plumbing question)

I have a house on a slab that had a bathtub drain that had become
disconnected for some reason, then the bathtub for 'x' years drained
into the ground under the slab, which of course caused the slab to
crack and subside. I got the slab mudjacked, which is marginally
helpful. Slab has wire mesh on the bottom, no rebar inside it.

I thought the route I would have to take would be to have the pipe
replaced leading from the bathtub drain to the main stack, which is
about 6' away. In order to make sure that I knew where said pipe went,
I rented a hammer drill and blew a hole in the slab about 8-9" across,
right where the pipe should have been. Of course, it wasn't there.
Then to prove my theory, I went over by the stack and dug another hole,
and of course the bathtub pipe doesn't connect there at all.
Apparently it connects more or less where the waste pipe leaves the
house.

So in order to - as one replier suggested a few days ago - get at the
drain under the tub, I made a third hole in the concrete slab, just to
be able to get in there and work. I dug out the dirt and mudjack cr*p,
and connected the tub to the original drain (which is an "S") and
voila, the darn thing works like a charm. I just let the water run in
the tub for half an hour, and there's no spills.

So but now I have three concrete holes. I think what I should do is
fill them with sand, compress it as best I can, then mix up some
industrial-strength concrete in a bucket and fill the holes. Does this
make sense ?

If nothing else I hope you enjoy the story about someone who was so
sure their theory was correct !

  #2   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 929
Default Concrete question (regarding previous plumbing question)


wrote:
I have a house on a slab that had a bathtub drain that had become
disconnected for some reason, then the bathtub for 'x' years drained
into the ground under the slab, which of course caused the slab to
crack and subside. I got the slab mudjacked, which is marginally
helpful. Slab has wire mesh on the bottom, no rebar inside it.

I thought the route I would have to take would be to have the pipe
replaced leading from the bathtub drain to the main stack, which is
about 6' away. In order to make sure that I knew where said pipe went,
I rented a hammer drill and blew a hole in the slab about 8-9" across,
right where the pipe should have been. Of course, it wasn't there.
Then to prove my theory, I went over by the stack and dug another hole,
and of course the bathtub pipe doesn't connect there at all.
Apparently it connects more or less where the waste pipe leaves the
house.

So in order to - as one replier suggested a few days ago - get at the
drain under the tub, I made a third hole in the concrete slab, just to
be able to get in there and work. I dug out the dirt and mudjack cr*p,
and connected the tub to the original drain (which is an "S") and
voila, the darn thing works like a charm. I just let the water run in
the tub for half an hour, and there's no spills.

So but now I have three concrete holes. I think what I should do is
fill them with sand, compress it as best I can, then mix up some
industrial-strength concrete in a bucket and fill the holes. Does this
make sense ?

If nothing else I hope you enjoy the story about someone who was so
sure their theory was correct !


I'd let the holes dry out somewhat, backfill with sand (you can use
soil but sand will compact easier than wet soil) to the level of the
bottom of the sab. Fill in the missing concrete with RapidSet &(~$15 /
bag 60lbs .44 cubic ft) you're done.

Just about everything in remodel / repair / retrofit differs from the
original plan. The key is to be able to adjust & correct on the fly.

All that matters is that it is safe, it works, doesn't create more
problems downstream & looks good.

Glad it worked out & you didn't have move that tub.

I'd say it could classified as a very successful repair job.

cheers
Bob

  #3   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 180
Default Concrete question (regarding previous plumbing question)

Thanks for the reply ! I am thrilled that the old drain works, that
saves me quite a bit of expense.

Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cutting Concrete? [email protected] Home Repair 20 September 28th 06 12:22 AM
Steel Beams for work shop komobu Home Repair 7 August 21st 06 11:59 AM
Concrete resurfacer question - why is all gray? [email protected] Home Repair 1 June 17th 05 04:13 PM
Newbie question - Uneven concrete subfloor. fh101 Home Repair 12 May 19th 05 04:15 AM
Stupid question of the day.... BSP screw-in plumbing connections [email protected] UK diy 6 March 22nd 05 11:17 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:24 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2023 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"