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riverhome
 
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Default Free standing deck

Want to construct 12' X 16' second story free standing deck to masonry
home. Contractor doesn't think free standing is safe. Any pros, cons,
advice?

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John F.
 
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Default Free standing deck


"riverhome" wrote in message
oups.com...
Want to construct 12' X 16' second story free standing deck to masonry
home. Contractor doesn't think free standing is safe. Any pros, cons,
advice?


If you are talking about some 4x4's sitting on concrete footings I would
agree with contractor...if you are talking about 8 x8's sunk 4 feet in the
ground and cross laced that would be different. More info is really needed
here. JFF




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Default Free standing deck


riverhome wrote:
Want to construct 12' X 16' second story free standing deck to masonry
home. Contractor doesn't think free standing is safe. Any pros, cons,
advice?



Ask the local building dept. Just about anywhere in the US, you'd need
a permit to build this, so that would be a good place to ask.

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riverhome
 
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Default Free standing deck

8 X 8 sunk 4 feet. 12' next to home extending out 16'. I'm the wife,
my husband can talk more intelligently about this, but we would like
not to drill/break into exterior walls. That's why we thought free
standing deck. Cross lacing -- how without obstructing basement door?
We can cross lace on south side (opposite basement door) and west side
without any problem.

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Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default Free standing deck


"riverhome" wrote in message
oups.com...
8 X 8 sunk 4 feet. 12' next to home extending out 16'. I'm the wife,
my husband can talk more intelligently about this, but we would like
not to drill/break into exterior walls. That's why we thought free
standing deck. Cross lacing -- how without obstructing basement door?
We can cross lace on south side (opposite basement door) and west side
without any problem.


By second story, do you men 8' off the ground or 16'? Can be done, of
course, but it will take some engineering to do it. You'll have to convince
the building inspector that it can take the wind load for your region, below
frost line, etc.

Just four lag bolts anchored into the masonry adds considerable strength
(torsional resistance?) But, since you prefer not to drill into the
masonry, you'll be adding considerably to the cost and materials needed.
Even a couple of anchor points will help with stability if you have
something to attach too.

IMO, the engineering is the easy part, the building inspector will be the
hard part.




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John F.
 
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Default Free standing deck

It may very well be that no building inspection or even a permit will be
required simply because it is NOT attached to the dwelling. John


"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message
news:FBM3g.4449$7c.1969@trndny01...

"riverhome" wrote in message
oups.com...
8 X 8 sunk 4 feet. 12' next to home extending out 16'. I'm the wife,
my husband can talk more intelligently about this, but we would like
not to drill/break into exterior walls. That's why we thought free
standing deck. Cross lacing -- how without obstructing basement door?
We can cross lace on south side (opposite basement door) and west side
without any problem.


By second story, do you men 8' off the ground or 16'? Can be done, of
course, but it will take some engineering to do it. You'll have to
convince the building inspector that it can take the wind load for your
region, below frost line, etc.

Just four lag bolts anchored into the masonry adds considerable strength
(torsional resistance?) But, since you prefer not to drill into the
masonry, you'll be adding considerably to the cost and materials needed.
Even a couple of anchor points will help with stability if you have
something to attach too.

IMO, the engineering is the easy part, the building inspector will be the
hard part.



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Default Free standing deck

I think that an engineer would be a good investment.
Footings, connections, and beams should be engineered.
Building department will, in all probability, want drawings by a pro.
And that includes attached deck as well.
TB

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Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default Free standing deck


"John F." wrote in message
...
It may very well be that no building inspection or even a permit will be
required simply because it is NOT attached to the dwelling. John


Possible, but it is still a habitable structure and will still have
requirements for railings, stairs, etc.


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Goedjn
 
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Default Free standing deck

On 26 Apr 2006 10:17:01 -0700, "
wrote:

I think that an engineer would be a good investment.
Footings, connections, and beams should be engineered.
Building department will, in all probability, want drawings by a pro.
And that includes attached deck as well.
TB


An engineer is way overkill for this project. You just need
someone who knows how heavy timber construction works, and
isn't afraid to spend money on wood.





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Default Free standing deck

whats the big deal about drilling into masonary?

if making it free standing adds 30% to the cost and you have to get a
engineer to design it, and at resale this will cause all sorts of home
inspection questions and may well scare off buyers or decrease your
home value......

IS IT WORTH ALL THIS??

using commonly accepted building practices has advantages well beyond
initial cost...

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Default Free standing deck

Whats the big deal about drilling into masonary?

Is it worth perhaps adding 1/3 to the decks cost, having to get a
engineer to approve design, hassles with local building inspector, then
later it will cause likely home inspection issues at resale time, may
scare off some buyers or decrease homes resale value...

Is it REALLY worth all this?

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Posted to alt.home.repair
 
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Default Free standing deck

Whats the big deal about drilling into masonary?

Is it worth perhaps adding 1/3 to the decks cost, having to get a
engineer to approve design, hassles with local building inspector, then
later it will cause likely home inspection issues at resale time, may
scare off some buyers or decrease homes resale value...

Is it REALLY worth all this?

  #14   Report Post  
Posted to alt.home.repair
 
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Default Free standing deck

Whats the big deal about drilling into masonary?

Is it worth perhaps adding 1/3 to the decks cost, having to get a
engineer to approve design, hassles with local building inspector, then
later it will cause likely home inspection issues at resale time, may
scare off some buyers or decrease homes resale value...

Is it REALLY worth all this?

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Tim and Steph
 
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Default Free standing deck

Agreed on all points! Anchor it to the house. It's cheaper, it's stronger,
doesn't require an engineer, and your currently selected contractor can do
it. Masonry anchors are plently solid, won't compromise the structure if
properly installed, and are trivial to install.


wrote in message
ps.com...
whats the big deal about drilling into masonary?

if making it free standing adds 30% to the cost and you have to get a
engineer to design it, and at resale this will cause all sorts of home
inspection questions and may well scare off buyers or decrease your
home value......

IS IT WORTH ALL THIS??

using commonly accepted building practices has advantages well beyond
initial cost...



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Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default Free standing deck


"Goedjn" wrote in message

An engineer is way overkill for this project. You just need
someone who knows how heavy timber construction works, and
isn't afraid to spend money on wood.


But could an engineer eliminate much of the bracing wood by using other
materials? SS wire?


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