Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old February 10th 06, 10:07 PM posted to alt.home.repair
helpme
 
Posts: n/a
Default Light switch 3 pole and 2 pole

Please help. I just installed two 2 pole light switches in the bedroom
(they should have been 3 pole). When I went to turn on the power it
tripped a breaker so I knew it was not right. I looked online and
found I should have bought two 3 pole switches, so I went to HD and got
2 of them. Now they are both installed, but I am unable to turn on the
light. When I tested with a multimeter I found only one switch has
power going to it while the other has none. Anyone have a clue what
happened? Did I 'fry' the wires? What do I do now?


  #2   Report Post  
Old February 10th 06, 10:55 PM posted to alt.home.repair
RBM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Light switch 3 pole and 2 pole

There are single pole and three way switches. For you to have tripped the
breaker you must have installed one of the "extra" wires onto the ground
terminal. The three way switch that has no power is that way either because
of a tripped breaker or because its corresponding three way switch is in the
position that doesn't send power to it. You need to get a drawing of how
three way switches are wired or hire someone to help you



"helpme" wrote in message
ups.com...
Please help. I just installed two 2 pole light switches in the bedroom
(they should have been 3 pole). When I went to turn on the power it
tripped a breaker so I knew it was not right. I looked online and
found I should have bought two 3 pole switches, so I went to HD and got
2 of them. Now they are both installed, but I am unable to turn on the
light. When I tested with a multimeter I found only one switch has
power going to it while the other has none. Anyone have a clue what
happened? Did I 'fry' the wires? What do I do now?



  #3   Report Post  
Old February 10th 06, 11:40 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Jeff Wisnia
 
Posts: n/a
Default Light switch 3 pole and 2 pole

helpme wrote:

Please help. I just installed two 2 pole light switches in the bedroom
(they should have been 3 pole). When I went to turn on the power it
tripped a breaker so I knew it was not right. I looked online and
found I should have bought two 3 pole switches, so I went to HD and got
2 of them. Now they are both installed, but I am unable to turn on the
light. When I tested with a multimeter I found only one switch has
power going to it while the other has none. Anyone have a clue what
happened? Did I 'fry' the wires? What do I do now?


Assuming there were 3-way switches and the proper number of wires there
already, installing new 3-way switches correctly should get it working
again.

The breaker will have protected the wiring, so it is very unlikely you
damaged anything.

Go back to Home Depot and buy a book on basic electrical wiring.

You don't know what you are doing now, but your post is intelligible
enough so that I'd guess with a book to guide you you'll come up to
speed fast.

HTH,

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
  #4   Report Post  
Old February 11th 06, 04:38 AM posted to alt.home.repair
mm
 
Posts: n/a
Default Light switch 3 pole and 2 pole

On 10 Feb 2006 14:07:17 -0800, "helpme"
wrote:

Please help. I just installed two 2 pole light switches in the bedroom
(they should have been 3 pole). When I went to turn on the power it
tripped a breaker so I knew it was not right. I looked online and
found I should have bought two 3 pole switches, so I went to HD and got
2 of them. Now they are both installed, but I am unable to turn on the
light. When I tested with a multimeter I found only one switch has
power going to it while the other has none. Anyone have a clue what
happened? Did I 'fry' the wires? What do I do now?


I agree with all that Jeff says.

FTR, they are called 2-way and 3-way, terms of art, used only in 110
volt electricity**, afaik.. None except 4-way is more than one pole.

**And maybe in Europe they use the same terms with 220 volt
electricity. I don't know about Africa and Asia!

2-way is single-pole, single throw, and
3-way is single-pole, double-throw.
4-way is double-pole, double-throw, and it is assemble so the two
throws reverse the poles. But you're not quite ready for 4-way yet.




Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let
me know if you have posted also.
  #5   Report Post  
Old February 11th 06, 04:41 AM posted to alt.home.repair
buffalobill
 
Posts: n/a
Default Light switch 3 pole and 2 pole

go here for links to wiring illustrations:
http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/switchoutlet/



  #6   Report Post  
Old February 11th 06, 01:09 PM posted to alt.home.repair
BP
 
Posts: n/a
Default Light switch 3 pole and 2 pole


"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
...
helpme wrote:

Please help. I just installed two 2 pole light switches in the bedroom
(they should have been 3 pole). When I went to turn on the power it
tripped a breaker so I knew it was not right. I looked online and
found I should have bought two 3 pole switches, so I went to HD and got
2 of them. Now they are both installed, but I am unable to turn on the
light. When I tested with a multimeter I found only one switch has
power going to it while the other has none. Anyone have a clue what
happened? Did I 'fry' the wires? What do I do now?


Assuming there were 3-way switches and the proper number of wires there
already, installing new 3-way switches correctly should get it working
again.

The breaker will have protected the wiring, so it is very unlikely you
damaged anything.

Go back to Home Depot and buy a book on basic electrical wiring.

You don't know what you are doing now, but your post is intelligible
enough so that I'd guess with a book to guide you you'll come up to speed
fast.

HTH,

Jeff


"The breaker will have protected the wiring"
Actually, the breaker is there to protect the humans. Though rare, the
devices can be damaged in a hard short.


  #7   Report Post  
Old February 11th 06, 01:45 PM posted to alt.home.repair
RBM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Light switch 3 pole and 2 pole

Circuit breakers protect wiring and equipment and by doing so, secondarily
protect humans


"BP" wrote in message
news

"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
...
helpme wrote:

Please help. I just installed two 2 pole light switches in the bedroom
(they should have been 3 pole). When I went to turn on the power it
tripped a breaker so I knew it was not right. I looked online and
found I should have bought two 3 pole switches, so I went to HD and got
2 of them. Now they are both installed, but I am unable to turn on the
light. When I tested with a multimeter I found only one switch has
power going to it while the other has none. Anyone have a clue what
happened? Did I 'fry' the wires? What do I do now?


Assuming there were 3-way switches and the proper number of wires there
already, installing new 3-way switches correctly should get it working
again.

The breaker will have protected the wiring, so it is very unlikely you
damaged anything.

Go back to Home Depot and buy a book on basic electrical wiring.

You don't know what you are doing now, but your post is intelligible
enough so that I'd guess with a book to guide you you'll come up to speed
fast.

HTH,

Jeff


"The breaker will have protected the wiring"
Actually, the breaker is there to protect the humans. Though rare, the
devices can be damaged in a hard short.



  #8   Report Post  
Old February 11th 06, 04:42 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Jeff Wisnia
 
Posts: n/a
Default Light switch 3 pole and 2 pole

BP wrote:
"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
...

helpme wrote:


Please help. I just installed two 2 pole light switches in the bedroom
(they should have been 3 pole). When I went to turn on the power it
tripped a breaker so I knew it was not right. I looked online and
found I should have bought two 3 pole switches, so I went to HD and got
2 of them. Now they are both installed, but I am unable to turn on the
light. When I tested with a multimeter I found only one switch has
power going to it while the other has none. Anyone have a clue what
happened? Did I 'fry' the wires? What do I do now?


Assuming there were 3-way switches and the proper number of wires there
already, installing new 3-way switches correctly should get it working
again.

The breaker will have protected the wiring, so it is very unlikely you
damaged anything.

Go back to Home Depot and buy a book on basic electrical wiring.

You don't know what you are doing now, but your post is intelligible
enough so that I'd guess with a book to guide you you'll come up to speed
fast.

HTH,

Jeff



"The breaker will have protected the wiring"
Actually, the breaker is there to protect the humans. Though rare, the
devices can be damaged in a hard short.


Oh???

Would you be willing to try clenching your right hand around a bare hot
feed wire and your left hand around its bare neutral wire and depend on
the upstream 15 amp breaker to "protect" you?

I suspect not.

The breaker "protects" the wiring and devices to the best of its
ability, and the relatively new arc fault detecting breakers add another
dimension of protection.

Breakers are there to limit heating caused by overcurrents and by so
doing prevent fires. Thus, they only indirectly "protect" humans.

I stand by what I wrote, the OPs "wiring" wouldn't have much chance of
being damaged because the breaker (which popped) would have protected them.

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
  #9   Report Post  
Old February 11th 06, 06:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Mark Lloyd
 
Posts: n/a
Default Light switch 3 pole and 2 pole

On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 23:38:11 -0500, mm
wrote:

On 10 Feb 2006 14:07:17 -0800, "helpme"
wrote:

Please help. I just installed two 2 pole light switches in the bedroom
(they should have been 3 pole). When I went to turn on the power it
tripped a breaker so I knew it was not right. I looked online and
found I should have bought two 3 pole switches, so I went to HD and got
2 of them. Now they are both installed, but I am unable to turn on the
light. When I tested with a multimeter I found only one switch has
power going to it while the other has none. Anyone have a clue what
happened? Did I 'fry' the wires? What do I do now?


I agree with all that Jeff says.

FTR, they are called 2-way and 3-way, terms of art, used only in 110
volt electricity**, afaik.. None except 4-way is more than one pole.

**And maybe in Europe they use the same terms with 220 volt
electricity. I don't know about Africa and Asia!

2-way is single-pole, single throw, and
3-way is single-pole, double-throw.
4-way is double-pole, double-throw, and it is assemble so the two
throws reverse the poles. But you're not quite ready for 4-way yet.




A switch for 240V (US) would be double-pole.


Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let
me know if you have posted also.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what
to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb
contesting the vote." - Benjamin Franklin
  #10   Report Post  
Old February 12th 06, 03:39 PM posted to alt.home.repair
BP
 
Posts: n/a
Default Light switch 3 pole and 2 pole


"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
et...
BP wrote:
"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
...

helpme wrote:


Please help. I just installed two 2 pole light switches in the bedroom
(they should have been 3 pole). When I went to turn on the power it
tripped a breaker so I knew it was not right. I looked online and
found I should have bought two 3 pole switches, so I went to HD and got
2 of them. Now they are both installed, but I am unable to turn on the
light. When I tested with a multimeter I found only one switch has
power going to it while the other has none. Anyone have a clue what
happened? Did I 'fry' the wires? What do I do now?


Assuming there were 3-way switches and the proper number of wires there
already, installing new 3-way switches correctly should get it working
again.

The breaker will have protected the wiring, so it is very unlikely you
damaged anything.

Go back to Home Depot and buy a book on basic electrical wiring.

You don't know what you are doing now, but your post is intelligible
enough so that I'd guess with a book to guide you you'll come up to speed
fast.

HTH,

Jeff



"The breaker will have protected the wiring"
Actually, the breaker is there to protect the humans. Though rare, the
devices can be damaged in a hard short.

Oh???

Would you be willing to try clenching your right hand around a bare hot
feed wire and your left hand around its bare neutral wire and depend on
the upstream 15 amp breaker to "protect" you?

I suspect not.

The breaker "protects" the wiring and devices to the best of its ability,
and the relatively new arc fault detecting breakers add another dimension
of protection.

Breakers are there to limit heating caused by overcurrents and by so doing
prevent fires. Thus, they only indirectly "protect" humans.

I stand by what I wrote, the OPs "wiring" wouldn't have much chance of
being damaged because the breaker (which popped) would have protected
them.

Jeff

You are, of course, technically correct. I didn't mean to say your entire
point was wromg. It is not. And I should have said "protect the humans from
fire".
But...
In a "hard short", when the hot lead is inadvertantly connected to the
nuetral lead on a connected device, the breaker does not cut the current
fast enough to protect *every* device. This applies far more to electronic
devices connected to the circuits ( see http://www.bcae1.com/cirbrakr.htm)
than dumb devices like wall switches, and this is the point I was trying to
alert people to. But even a wall switch can be damaged in a hard short
("though rare") particularly if it had a slight defect to begin with. With
all of the microelectronic circuitry built into so many devices used in
homes today, in addition to the big ones like computers, TVs, and sound
equipment, it would be less than accurate for people to believe that the
circuit breaker will protect those devices from damage. It will not.
And, "while rare", the OP *could* have damaged the switch if he hard shorted
it.




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Electrical : 3 way -- Single Pole (Light Switch) AC Home Repair 7 November 24th 05 05:13 AM
Old house, Ceiling Light Fixture Died, No Change After New Switch ASE Home Repair 3 February 7th 05 01:57 AM
3 way switch disaster (long but interesting) RB Home Repair 8 July 23rd 04 02:18 PM
Double-pole single toggle switch vs. 3-way switch? East Coast Home Repair 5 June 26th 04 01:05 AM
how to rewire bathroom pull switch to regular light switch Nick UK diy 20 January 20th 04 07:57 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:30 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017