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Jack
 
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Default Household Lube-- what do you use?

So what are you using around the the house now-days.

I used to use WD40 on everything.. but I have started lately moving
towards white lithium grease in aerosol can.

The wd40 seems to attract dirt and junk when it is dried up. I tend to
now just use it to lubricate while drilling metal.. or to hit a bolt
that I am screwing out.. or to loosten moderately stuck stuff.. but
nothing "long term"

The White Lithim makes a mess when it goes on.. and looks bad, but I
think it has better staying properties.

What do you use for general around the house stuff.. specifically bike
chains & parts

  #2   Report Post  
George
 
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Jack wrote:
So what are you using around the the house now-days.

I used to use WD40 on everything.. but I have started lately moving
towards white lithium grease in aerosol can.

The wd40 seems to attract dirt and junk when it is dried up. I tend to
now just use it to lubricate while drilling metal.. or to hit a bolt
that I am screwing out.. or to loosten moderately stuck stuff.. but
nothing "long term"

The White Lithim makes a mess when it goes on.. and looks bad, but I
think it has better staying properties.

What do you use for general around the house stuff.. specifically bike
chains & parts



You are noticing what you descibe because wd40 isn't a lubricant. I
think more things have been ruined by wd40 than have been repaired by
using it.

I like progold chain lube for bike chains because it doesn't collect dirt.
  #3   Report Post  
Joseph Meehan
 
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Jack wrote:
So what are you using around the the house now-days.

I used to use WD40 on everything.. but I have started lately moving
towards white lithium grease in aerosol can.

The wd40 seems to attract dirt and junk when it is dried up. I tend
to now just use it to lubricate while drilling metal.. or to hit a
bolt that I am screwing out.. or to loosten moderately stuck stuff..
but nothing "long term"

The White Lithim makes a mess when it goes on.. and looks bad, but I
think it has better staying properties.

What do you use for general around the house stuff.. specifically bike
chains & parts


I use all kinds of lubes depending on what I am using it for.

For bike chains I use a lube designed for just that. Find it at any
good bike shop. Pick up a chain cleaner where you are there. makes
cleaning them a snap.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit


  #4   Report Post  
Jack
 
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What?... you to good to soak the chain in gasoline to clean it.. like
we did as kids?

(It is amazing that I survived to adulthood!)

  #5   Report Post  
John Hines
 
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"Jack" wrote:

So what are you using around the the house now-days.


Good ol' 3n1 (aka 10wt) oil. With an oil can of straight 30wt in the
garage for heavier duty use.

The wd40 seems to attract dirt and junk when it is dried up. I tend to
now just use it to lubricate while drilling metal.. or to hit a bolt
that I am screwing out.. or to loosten moderately stuck stuff.. but
nothing "long term"


A machinest friend gave me a partial can of cutting fluid, but again,
10wt oil does wonders.

Liquid wrench for rusty bolts, and I use Boeshield T-9 for protecting
tools.

What do you use for general around the house stuff.. specifically bike
chains & parts


As others have suggested, a product designed for this specific
application?


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Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default


"Jack" wrote in message
oups.com...
So what are you using around the the house now-days.

I used to use WD40 on everything.. but I have started lately moving
towards white lithium grease in aerosol can.


I use the white grease on some things, 3 in 1 oil on a lot of others. WD-40
is a good took, but a poor lubricant long term.For things that should be
clean, like a sticky window, silicone spray works.


  #7   Report Post  
Doug Miller
 
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In article .com, "Jack" wrote:
So what are you using around the the house now-days.

I used to use WD40 on everything.. but I have started lately moving
towards white lithium grease in aerosol can.


There's no single lubricant that's best for everything. What you use depends
on what needs to be lubed. Just make sure you use the right lube for the job,
whether it's white lithium grease, axle grease, 30W oil, or K-Y Jelly.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
  #8   Report Post  
SQLit
 
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"Jack" wrote in message
oups.com...
So what are you using around the the house now-days.

I used to use WD40 on everything.. but I have started lately moving
towards white lithium grease in aerosol can.

The wd40 seems to attract dirt and junk when it is dried up. I tend to
now just use it to lubricate while drilling metal.. or to hit a bolt
that I am screwing out.. or to loosten moderately stuck stuff.. but
nothing "long term"

The White Lithim makes a mess when it goes on.. and looks bad, but I
think it has better staying properties.

What do you use for general around the house stuff.. specifically bike
chains & parts


Triflow, in the dropper bottles. I do not use the spray any more.


  #9   Report Post  
Roger Taylor
 
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Default


So what are you using around the the house now-days.

I used to use WD40 on everything.. but I have started lately moving
towards white lithium grease in aerosol can.
The wd40 seems to attract dirt and junk when it is dried up. I tend to
now just use it to lubricate while drilling metal.. or to hit a bolt
that I am screwing out.. or to loosten moderately stuck stuff.. but
nothing "long term"
The White Lithim makes a mess when it goes on.. and looks bad, but I
think it has better staying properties.
What do you use for general around the house stuff.. specifically bike
chains & parts

Some of the stuff I use:

Wrench Force extra dry chain lube for bikes. Does not fling off. There are
many brands.
WD-40 (in tiny amounts) for storing tools rust free in garage. It is not a
lube.
Tetra lube or Breakfree for guns, and small parts.
3-in-1 for hinges, non-chain bike mechanisms, and fan bearings.
Lithium grease for high shear apps, such as wheel bearings of all kinds.
Garage Door grease - lith. or silicone - for screw drives and gar. door
hinges.
Silicone grease (will not rot rubber parts) for making up hose joints and
waterproof apps.
Graphite powder for door locks.
Silicone stick for drawer glides, and wood against wood.
Silicone (not wd40!) spray for derailleur and similar bicycle parts.
Get the drift? There is no one good lube, but many.




  #10   Report Post  
Stormin Mormon
 
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Wrench Force extra dry chain lube for bikes. Does not fling off. There are
many brands.
CY: I've got a bike chain to lube, one of these days. I was considering
white lith, makes less mess when it rubs onto my pants legs.

WD-40 (in tiny amounts) for storing tools rust free in garage. It is not a
lube.
CY: Does OK for removing stickers, and some other things.

Tetra lube or Breakfree for guns, and small parts.
CY: Not heard of that.

3-in-1 for hinges, non-chain bike mechanisms, and fan bearings.
CY: Fan berrings, needs Zoom Spout Turbine Oil. Three N One dries out too
soon. Also ND20 works well, or two stroke gas mixer oil (no gasoline,
please).


Lithium grease for high shear apps, such as wheel bearings of all kinds.
CY: Also door hinges. And the latch mechanisms of cars.

Garage Door grease - lith. or silicone - for screw drives and gar. door
hinges.
CY: Sounds good.


Silicone grease (will not rot rubber parts) for making up hose joints and
waterproof apps.
CY: Good one.

Graphite powder for door locks.
CY: If locks are exposed to the weather such as car door locks, I use spray
oil. Whatever brand I've got in my hand is OK.

Silicone stick for drawer glides, and wood against wood.
Silicone (not wd40!) spray for derailleur and similar bicycle parts.
CY: I used cheap Walmart silicone one time on a bike chain. Popular
Mechanics brand, if memory serves. Well, the family got home (five hours
drive) and ac ouple days later the little guy's bike chain locked up. I'll
never buy cheap junk silicone again.

Get the drift? There is no one good lube, but many.

CY: I have a Kwikset Tylo entry lock on the back door. the mechanism started
to get cranky (not the keyhole part) and I packed it with wheel berring
grease. Same grease I use on CV joint boots, except that with he CV boots I
use a syringe needle on my grease gun.







  #11   Report Post  
Nick Hull
 
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In article ,
"Stormin Mormon" wrote:


Graphite powder for door locks.
CY: If locks are exposed to the weather such as car door locks, I use spray
oil. Whatever brand I've got in my hand is OK.


For door locks the best I've found is STP. Applied before winter, the
lock will not freeze. Graphite contains water and accelerates corrosion.

--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
  #12   Report Post  
Bob
 
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"Nick Hull" wrote in message news:nhull-
For door locks the best I've found is STP. Applied before winter, the
lock will not freeze. Graphite contains water and accelerates corrosion.


The graphite I've used is a dry powder. Where is the water?

Bob


  #13   Report Post  
 
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like motorcycle chain lube in the spray can for lubing
hinges,cables,about anything..lucas

http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm

  #14   Report Post  
Doug Miller
 
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Default

In article ,
Nick Hull wrote...

... an excellent example of why you should be *very* careful taking advice
from Usenet...

In article ,
"Stormin Mormon" wrote:
Graphite powder for door locks.
CY: If locks are exposed to the weather such as car door locks, I use spray
oil. Whatever brand I've got in my hand is OK.


For door locks the best I've found is STP.


STP?? In a door lock??? Might as well put glue in there.

Applied before winter, the
lock will not freeze.


Locks don't freeze anyway, unless they get water in them. That's one reason
for having storm doors.

Graphite contains water and accelerates corrosion.


Baloney. Graphite doesn't contain water. It's a dry powder. Sometimes it's
sold in an oil suspension, too, which is a *great* thing for lubing a lock.



--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
  #15   Report Post  
Goedjn
 
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Locks don't freeze anyway, unless they get water in them. That's one reason
for having storm doors.

Graphite contains water and accelerates corrosion.


Baloney. Graphite doesn't contain water. It's a dry powder. Sometimes it's
sold in an oil suspension, too, which is a *great* thing for lubing a lock.


Graphite is hygroscopic. If it doesn't contain water when you
unseal the tube, it will shortly thereafter.



  #16   Report Post  
Nick Hull
 
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In article ,
"Bob" wrote:

"Nick Hull" wrote in message news:nhull-
For door locks the best I've found is STP. Applied before winter, the
lock will not freeze. Graphite contains water and accelerates corrosion.


The graphite I've used is a dry powder. Where is the water?


Inside the chrystal structure. Bake all the water out and you have soot.

--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
  #17   Report Post  
Tony
 
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Ha! I know what you mean. I used to clean the chain in gas....and
did one better. I scrubbed it with a wire brush.

On the topic though, it depends on the applciation. Some lubes are
better for some things that others.

Chain lube tends to be designed not to fling off.
Graphite doesn't attract dirt
Silicone works well for things like windows and also doesn't attract
dirt.
Various oils work good for penetrants (liquid wrench, Kroil, Marvel
Mystery Oil)

It depends on what you want to do.

Tony




On 6 Oct 2005 13:52:30 -0700, "Jack" wrote:

What?... you to good to soak the chain in gasoline to clean it.. like
we did as kids?

(It is amazing that I survived to adulthood!)

  #18   Report Post  
Doug Miller
 
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Default

In article , Goedjn wrote:


Locks don't freeze anyway, unless they get water in them. That's one reason
for having storm doors.

Graphite contains water and accelerates corrosion.


Baloney. Graphite doesn't contain water. It's a dry powder. Sometimes it's
sold in an oil suspension, too, which is a *great* thing for lubing a lock.


Graphite is hygroscopic. If it doesn't contain water when you
unseal the tube, it will shortly thereafter.


Only if you're dumb enough to leave the cap off the tube.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
  #19   Report Post  
Doug Miller
 
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Default

In article , Nick Hull wrote:
In article ,
"Bob" wrote:

"Nick Hull" wrote in message news:nhull-
For door locks the best I've found is STP. Applied before winter, the
lock will not freeze. Graphite contains water and accelerates corrosion.


The graphite I've used is a dry powder. Where is the water?


Inside the chrystal structure. Bake all the water out and you have soot.

Absolute nonsense. Graphite is pure crystalline carbon. No water in it at all.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
  #20   Report Post  
Stormin Mormon
 
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I've never considered STP. Seems a bit thick and gloopy for locks. I'd
expect it to get thicker when it gets cold.

Graphite is one of the three forms of the element carbon. It contains
neither hydrogen nor oxygen, and therefore no water.

--

Christopher A. Young
Do good work.
It's longer in the short run
but shorter in the long run.
..
..


"Nick Hull" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Stormin Mormon" wrote:


Graphite powder for door locks.
CY: If locks are exposed to the weather such as car door locks, I use

spray
oil. Whatever brand I've got in my hand is OK.


For door locks the best I've found is STP. Applied before winter, the
lock will not freeze. Graphite contains water and accelerates corrosion.

--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/




  #21   Report Post  
Stormin Mormon
 
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OOOOHHH, that's a straight line!!!! Someone stop me!!!

--

Christopher A. Young
Do good work.
It's longer in the short run
but shorter in the long run.
..
..


"Bob" wrote in message
...

"Nick Hull" wrote in message news:nhull-
For door locks the best I've found is STP. Applied before winter, the
lock will not freeze. Graphite contains water and accelerates corrosion.


The graphite I've used is a dry powder. Where is the water?

Bob



  #22   Report Post  
Stormin Mormon
 
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OK, I'm calling for references. Lets see some proof.

--

Christopher A. Young
Do good work.
It's longer in the short run
but shorter in the long run.
..
..


"Nick Hull" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Bob" wrote:

"Nick Hull" wrote in message news:nhull-
For door locks the best I've found is STP. Applied before winter, the
lock will not freeze. Graphite contains water and accelerates

corrosion.

The graphite I've used is a dry powder. Where is the water?


Inside the chrystal structure. Bake all the water out and you have soot.

--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/


  #23   Report Post  
Stormin Mormon
 
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1) Lock Ease, they call it. I used to service the locks at a hotel that used
lock ease. The stuff dries up, and creates more problems than it solves. I
avoid the stuff, and ask people not to use it. (20 years experience as a
locksmith)

2) I've never heard that graphite is hygroscopic. some proof, please? I've
used a graphite dispenser that I bought in 1986 or so. I've long since lost
the cap, and can't say as it's ever absorbed moisture. It's raining today,
and I was using powdered graphite less than an hour ago on a lock call. No
signs of moisture.

--

Christopher A. Young
Do good work.
It's longer in the short run
but shorter in the long run.
..
..


Baloney. Graphite doesn't contain water. It's a dry powder. Sometimes it's
sold in an oil suspension, too, which is a *great* thing for lubing a

lock.

Graphite is hygroscopic. If it doesn't contain water when you
unseal the tube, it will shortly thereafter.


Only if you're dumb enough to leave the cap off the tube.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.


  #25   Report Post  
Angrie.Woman
 
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Default Household Lube-- what do you use?

Stormin Mormon wrote:
1) Lock Ease, they call it. I used to service the locks at a hotel that used
lock ease. The stuff dries up, and creates more problems than it solves. I
avoid the stuff, and ask people not to use it. (20 years experience as a
locksmith)

2) I've never heard that graphite is hygroscopic. some proof, please? I've
used a graphite dispenser that I bought in 1986 or so. I've long since lost
the cap, and can't say as it's ever absorbed moisture. It's raining today,
and I was using powdered graphite less than an hour ago on a lock call. No
signs of moisture.


Many moons ago I used to work in a hardware store. We had locksmith on
staff. He always used, and sent customers home with, graphite powder. He
said that any oily substance would accumulate debris and eventually muck
up the works.

I'm still on that page.

A
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