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Old September 26th 05, 10:48 PM
 
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Default copper fittings for use with a pressure gage

Hello,
I am looking for a fitting that will allow be to have a pressure gauge
near the inlet of my city water so I can always see what my pressure
is. I live on a hill near the water tank and our home pressure runs
about 40 psi most times. I would need a tee fitting that I could cut
into the 3/4" copper piping to allow the water through with a port for
the pressure gauge I have [Merrill PG100 with a 1/4" male thread]
Does such a beast exist or am I going to have to build something up
with brass fittings?



|
|
|----gauge Merrill PG100 with a 1/4" male thread
|
|

^
|
water direction

Thanks!
ayb


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Old September 26th 05, 11:35 PM
Toller
 
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I just stick mine on the drain of the water heater.


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Old September 27th 05, 12:02 AM
Greg O
 
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wrote in message
ups.com...
Hello,
I am looking for a fitting that will allow be to have a pressure gauge
near the inlet of my city water so I can always see what my pressure
is. I live on a hill near the water tank and our home pressure runs
about 40 psi most times. I would need a tee fitting that I could cut
into the 3/4" copper piping to allow the water through with a port for
the pressure gauge I have [Merrill PG100 with a 1/4" male thread]
Does such a beast exist or am I going to have to build something up
with brass fittings?



Hard to tell what is available in your area, but you should be able to find
a 3/4" sweat tee, with a female thread that you can bush down to the gauge.
If nothing else a 3/4" tee, with a female NPT adapter soldered to it.
Greg


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Old September 27th 05, 08:11 PM
Richard J Kinch
 
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Duane Bozarth writes:

Gages are pretty unreliable, especially when under pressure all the
time.


???? A device designed specifically for the purpose is unreliable???


Absolutely. This is the nature of the Bourdon tube mechanism.
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Old September 27th 05, 08:27 PM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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"Richard J Kinch" wrote in message
. ..
Duane Bozarth writes:

Gages are pretty unreliable, especially when under pressure all the
time.


???? A device designed specifically for the purpose is unreliable???


Absolutely. This is the nature of the Bourdon tube mechanism.


Can you quantify "unreliable'? Will they stick in one spot,? Not go up?
Not come down? Read high? Read low? All of the above?


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Old September 27th 05, 08:39 PM
Duane Bozarth
 
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Duane Bozarth writes:

Gages are pretty unreliable, especially when under pressure all the
time.


???? A device designed specifically for the purpose is unreliable???


Absolutely. This is the nature of the Bourdon tube mechanism.


Many other ways of building them...

Ones one the system here last for several years at least and then it's
rarely the gauge itself that fails, it's accumulated rust/sediment.

Units work in power plants for years as well...but, of course, they're
industrial units.
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Old September 27th 05, 08:41 PM
Richard J Kinch
 
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Edwin Pawlowski writes:

Absolutely. This is the nature of the Bourdon tube mechanism.


Can you quantify "unreliable'? Will they stick in one spot,? Not go
up? Not come down? Read high? Read low? All of the above?


All of the above are typical except perhaps reading high.

The least bit of corrosion from a wet or condensing environment will spoil
the little gears and bearings.

If you ever have a bad one to throw out, tear it apart and have a look.
Looks like the proverbial ladies watch.

Here's a pretty good explanation and diagram:

http://www.tpub.com/content/fc/14104/css/14104_232.htm
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