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William W. Plummer
 
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Default PT wood cupping and warping

A friend had a porch built about 10 years ago. The contractor used
pressure treated lumber but now, the wood is warping an cupping. I
need to replace it to make it safe to walk on. Also, the contractor
nailed it rather than screwed it together so the nails are working their
way out.

What type of wood should I use for the replacement? I'm looking for no
rotting and no physical changes.
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Sylvan Butler
 
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On Sun, 29 May 2005 16:52:39 -0400, William W. Plummer wrote:
A friend had a porch built about 10 years ago. The contractor used
pressure treated lumber but now, the wood is warping an cupping. I


What type of wood should I use for the replacement? I'm looking for no
rotting and no physical changes.


Wood? IPE. Or good redwood, if you can get it. Consider the synthetic
deck boards like Trex et al.

sdb

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Art
 
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Check Consumer Reports at the library. Either use composition material
review by them or double thickness planks of treated lumber. I will use
composition boards for my next deck.


"William W. Plummer" wrote in message
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A friend had a porch built about 10 years ago. The contractor used
pressure treated lumber but now, the wood is warping an cupping. I need
to replace it to make it safe to walk on. Also, the contractor nailed it
rather than screwed it together so the nails are working their way out.

What type of wood should I use for the replacement? I'm looking for no
rotting and no physical changes.



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I would look at the environment on the two opposing surfaces.
It's quite possible that there is enough humidity below the deck and
enough drying of the upper surface to promote cupping & warping.

Second, pressure treated wood has high moisture content. Look at kiln
dried pressure treated.
That's expensive. Let the wood come to a more nearly steady state while
stacked on the porch.
This is time consuming and there will be a high percentage of rejects.

TB

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Mikepier
 
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I just replaced all of the 2X6 badly weathered PT boards on my deck.
My joists spanned 2 feet apart, so if I wanted to use the composite
stuff I would have had to beef up the entire deck with more joists to
be 16" OC. So I just stuck with the same PT wood. It was cheaper. And I
think the previous owner did not maintain the deck well. At least now I
know I will maintain it.



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Stubby
 
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Sylvan Butler wrote:

On Sun, 29 May 2005 16:52:39 -0400, William W. Plummer wrote:

A friend had a porch built about 10 years ago. The contractor used
pressure treated lumber but now, the wood is warping an cupping. I



What type of wood should I use for the replacement? I'm looking for no
rotting and no physical changes.



Wood? IPE. Or good redwood, if you can get it. Consider the synthetic
deck boards like Trex et al.


Thanks. I like the idea of synthetic deck boards and I'll go looking
for them. Redwood is nice but it tends to splinter.
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