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blueman
 
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Default Are Medeco locks worth the premium?

While visiting the local locksmith last week, he pressed very hard to
sell me Medeco locks, saying that he couldn't recommend anything else.

We live in a "nice" house in a safe, residential neighborhood, with an
up-to-date alarm system.

Is the Medeco lock that much better and worth it than "standard" lock
technologies or does the locksmith just get a better commission
selling higher-priced Medeco models?

Thanks
  #2   Report Post  
 
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IMHO, yes, better cylinders are worth the money.

I actually prefer the Mul-T-Lock cylinders over Medeco.

Either one is good, though. They are harder to pick than
standard cylinders. Also, with Mul-T-Lock, you need a card
to duplicate the keys. That's supposed to prevent people
from making unathorized copies.

blueman wrote:
While visiting the local locksmith last week, he pressed very hard to
sell me Medeco locks, saying that he couldn't recommend anything

else.

We live in a "nice" house in a safe, residential neighborhood, with

an
up-to-date alarm system.

Is the Medeco lock that much better and worth it than "standard" lock
technologies or does the locksmith just get a better commission
selling higher-priced Medeco models?

Thanks


  #3   Report Post  
Stormin Mormon
 
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Depends on the skill level of the crooks in your area. I've been installing
Kwikset deadbolts for about 20 years. Used to like the Schlage line in the
80's, but they've gone to junk.
Medeco has higher pick and drill resistance. And some of their lines have
key control.

I live in a trailer park, and have had Kiwkset deadbolts on my doors for the
last 11 years. Of course, putting a $150 deadbolt on a plastic door in a
wood jamb doesn't make much sense.

Like you say, good neighborhood. I'd be tempted not to use Medeco.

--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
www.mormons.com


"blueman" wrote in message
...
While visiting the local locksmith last week, he pressed very hard to
sell me Medeco locks, saying that he couldn't recommend anything else.

We live in a "nice" house in a safe, residential neighborhood, with an
up-to-date alarm system.

Is the Medeco lock that much better and worth it than "standard" lock
technologies or does the locksmith just get a better commission
selling higher-priced Medeco models?

Thanks


  #4   Report Post  
 
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Stormin make a good point.
A great lock in a sorry frame is worthless.
I was told this story:
Air Force built metal storage buildings along a taxi way.
Locks were protected by steel shroud protecting hasp and padlock when
closed.
Screws securing metal siding could be undone with a dime.
TB

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Stormin make a good point.
A great lock in a sorry frame is worthless.
I was told this story:
Air Force built metal storage buildings along a taxi way.
Locks were protected by steel shroud protecting hasp and padlock when
closed.
Screws securing metal siding could be undone with a dime.
TB



  #6   Report Post  
Ralph Mowery
 
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"blueman" wrote in message
...
While visiting the local locksmith last week, he pressed very hard to
sell me Medeco locks, saying that he couldn't recommend anything else.

We live in a "nice" house in a safe, residential neighborhood, with an
up-to-date alarm system.

Is the Medeco lock that much better and worth it than "standard" lock
technologies or does the locksmith just get a better commission
selling higher-priced Medeco models?


When buying a lock for a house, go for the look you want. If anyone wants
in the lock is not going to slow them down. About all the lock does on most
houses is to keep out the kids. Just too many other ways in a house. It
really gets to me when the TV shows tell how to put a cut off broom and use
the stick to keep a window from opening. All you have to do is hit the
window with something and go right in.
Maybe some of the higher priced locks will operate smoother but that and the
look of them is all that matters.


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Stormin Mormon
 
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Reminds me of the shed I built years ago. Hasp, padlock, and a deadbolt. And
the sides of the shed were put on with drywall screws.

great illustration, thank you for your common sense. And got a smile.

--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
www.mormons.com


wrote in message
oups.com...
Stormin make a good point.
A great lock in a sorry frame is worthless.
I was told this story:
Air Force built metal storage buildings along a taxi way.
Locks were protected by steel shroud protecting hasp and padlock when
closed.
Screws securing metal siding could be undone with a dime.
TB


  #8   Report Post  
Michael Daly
 
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On 23-May-2005, blueman wrote:

Is the Medeco lock that much better and worth it than "standard" lock
technologies or does the locksmith just get a better commission
selling higher-priced Medeco models?


I think it's a little of both. They are definitely good locks, but
the locksmiths seem a little too eager to sell them, especially
after you've had your house broken into. DAMHIKT.

If you don't have a steel door frame and a really solid door, the best
lock is a waste of money. If the lock is the weakest part of the door,
then upgrade. Then make sure the rest of your house is equally secure.

Mike
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Scott Packard
 
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On Mon, 23 May 2005 16:44:28 +0000, blueman wrote:

While visiting the local locksmith last week, he pressed very hard to
sell me Medeco locks, saying that he couldn't recommend anything else.

We live in a "nice" house in a safe, residential neighborhood, with an
up-to-date alarm system.

Is the Medeco lock that much better and worth it than "standard" lock
technologies or does the locksmith just get a better commission
selling higher-priced Medeco models?

Thanks


Top quality. There are (or were) four grades of Medeco locks, the top
being no keys could ever be made again for the lock once it came from
the factory. They're used to secure all sorts of gov't. things that are
important, from armories to doors.
Just make sure the burglar can't smash a window to bypass the lock.
The locksmiths I go to never pressure-sell anything.

My latest lock choice was Abloy, because they are pretty cool.
But, they are harder to open when it's pitch black outside.
The conventional keyway of the Medeco would have made it easier to find
the keyway using the tip of the key.

I think alarms are a waste. Most people ignore the sound, and in
my area the cops are only going to file a report if things are taken.
Better idea is a) keep thiefs out by making your house harder to break
into than the next guy's, and b) webcams + motion sensors to record the
thief when he does break in.

- Scott
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