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Old May 13th 05, 04:46 AM
Rick Wilcox
 
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Default Folding Attic Stairs and Fire Barrier

I am installing attic stairs in my finished garage. I noticed the ceiling
is sheetrocked with 5/8" sheetrock usually associated with fire barrier. I
am tempted to attach a piece of sheetrock to the ceiling side of the
trapdoor panel of the stairs, but I think it may cause the door to become
too heavy and interfere with the operation of the door. The sheetrock would
be 22"x 53 1/2". Does anyone have some information they would like to share?



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Old May 13th 05, 11:55 AM
 
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Default

International Residential Code, a reasonable index of what is
acceptable to code officials, says:
Separate the garage from the house with at least 1/2 inch gypsum board.
This holds for walls or ceilings.
Since the area above your particular garage appears to be more nearly
part of the garage than part of the house, an inspector might accept
gypsum board on the wall of the attic that connects with the house. I
won't predict what any given inspector willl do.

TB

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Old May 13th 05, 11:56 AM
Mikepier
 
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Default

I don't think its necessary unless you are storing highly flammable
liquids. But if you want, just attach a piece of sheet metal on the
door.

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Old May 13th 05, 03:31 PM
The Real Tom
 
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Default

On 13 May 2005 03:56:32 -0700, "Mikepier"
wrote:

I don't think its necessary unless you are storing highly flammable
liquids. But if you want, just attach a piece of sheet metal on the
door.



Generally having a parked car in the garage is treated as if you are
'storing highly flammable liquids' in the garage.

tom
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Old May 13th 05, 04:16 PM
Percival P. Cassidy
 
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Default

The roof space of our 30-yr-old house is continuous. I.e., there is no
wall at all between the part above the garage and the part above the
living area.

Is that a Code violation? Should we think about constructing a
fireproof/fire-resistant barrier in the roof?

Perce


On 05/13/05 06:55 am tossed the following
ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

International Residential Code, a reasonable index of what is
acceptable to code officials, says:
Separate the garage from the house with at least 1/2 inch gypsum board.
This holds for walls or ceilings.
Since the area above your particular garage appears to be more nearly
part of the garage than part of the house, an inspector might accept
gypsum board on the wall of the attic that connects with the house. I
won't predict what any given inspector willl do.



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Old May 13th 05, 06:10 PM
G Henslee
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
The roof space of our 30-yr-old house is continuous. I.e., there is no
wall at all between the part above the garage and the part above the
living area.

Is that a Code violation? Should we think about constructing a
fireproof/fire-resistant barrier in the roof?

Perce


To provide a one-hour fire resistive seperation between the garage and
the dwelling, install drywall (5/8" type X) on the dividing wall between
the garage and house on the garage side extending up to the roof
sheathing, or drywall that same wall up and out on the ceiling of the
garage. Tape the joints.

Btw, openings between the garage and dwelling shall be provided with a
1-3/8" solid wood or metal clad door installed with a self-closing
device. Openings in one-hour resistive ceilings are permitted if
protected by a UL listed fire door.
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Old May 13th 05, 07:02 PM
Pop
 
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Default

Careful, this thread has gone into areas of techincally
correct but unnecessary "requirements" in more than one
post. Best thing to do is get the answer from the
horse's mouth, and begin at the local Code Enforcement
Office. Some things will be grandfathered, some won't,
sometimes IF you work on it you have to upgrade and
maybe something else, or if you sell it then ... and on
and on and on, and I forgot the Homeowner's Insurance
get involved, too if it's not to code. Only your CEO
will know for sure or at least have access to be able
to know for sure.

Pop


"G Henslee" wrote in message
...
Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
The roof space of our 30-yr-old house is continuous.
I.e., there is no wall at all between the part above
the garage and the part above the living area.

Is that a Code violation? Should we think about
constructing a fireproof/fire-resistant barrier in
the roof?

Perce


To provide a one-hour fire resistive seperation
between the garage and the dwelling, install drywall
(5/8" type X) on the dividing wall between the garage
and house on the garage side extending up to the roof
sheathing, or drywall that same wall up and out on
the ceiling of the garage. Tape the joints.

Btw, openings between the garage and dwelling shall
be provided with a 1-3/8" solid wood or metal clad
door installed with a self-closing device. Openings
in one-hour resistive ceilings are permitted if
protected by a UL listed fire door.



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Old May 13th 05, 07:28 PM
G Henslee
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Pop wrote:




"G Henslee" wrote in message
...

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

The roof space of our 30-yr-old house is continuous.
I.e., there is no wall at all between the part above
the garage and the part above the living area.

Is that a Code violation? Should we think about
constructing a fireproof/fire-resistant barrier in
the roof?

Perce


To provide a one-hour fire resistive seperation
between the garage and the dwelling, install drywall
(5/8" type X) on the dividing wall between the garage
and house on the garage side extending up to the roof
sheathing, or drywall that same wall up and out on
the ceiling of the garage. Tape the joints.

Btw, openings between the garage and dwelling shall
be provided with a 1-3/8" solid wood or metal clad
door installed with a self-closing device. Openings
in one-hour resistive ceilings are permitted if
protected by a UL listed fire door.





top posting corrected


Careful, this thread has gone into areas of techincally
correct but unnecessary "requirements" in more than one
post. Best thing to do is get the answer from the
horse's mouth, and begin at the local Code Enforcement
Office. Some things will be grandfathered, some won't,
sometimes IF you work on it you have to upgrade and
maybe something else, or if you sell it then ... and on
and on and on, and I forgot the Homeowner's Insurance
get involved, too if it's not to code. Only your CEO
will know for sure or at least have access to be able
to know for sure.

Pop



Pop,

What do you think the "local Code Enforcement Office" uses to administer
and enforce the codes 'locally'? To mention a few, ever heard of the
Uniform Building Code, International Building Code, International
Residential Code?

Among others, I've got all of those code books sitting on my desk for
referral. They *are* the horses mouth and are all or in part adopted by
governmental agencys/building departments/code enforcement departments
nationwide with regards to building codes and their enforcement of them.

When it comes to the "requirements and technicalities" regarding
housing, zoning, or public nuisance codes, as an ICBO, IBC, and CCEO
certified building, zoning, and code enforcement inspector I believe I
can give it from the horses mouth.

OTH if all I had to offer for advice was "maybe this or maybe that and
call your local inspector" then I would really have nothing to offer
here and I wouldn't.
  #9   Report Post  
Old May 13th 05, 09:14 PM
Waldo
 
Posts: n/a
Default



G Henslee wrote:
Pop wrote:




"G Henslee" wrote in message
...

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

The roof space of our 30-yr-old house is continuous. I.e., there is
no wall at all between the part above the garage and the part above
the living area.

Is that a Code violation? Should we think about constructing a
fireproof/fire-resistant barrier in the roof?

Perce


To provide a one-hour fire resistive seperation between the garage
and the dwelling, install drywall (5/8" type X) on the dividing wall
between the garage and house on the garage side extending up to the
roof sheathing, or drywall that same wall up and out on the ceiling
of the garage. Tape the joints.

Btw, openings between the garage and dwelling shall be provided with
a 1-3/8" solid wood or metal clad door installed with a self-closing
device. Openings in one-hour resistive ceilings are permitted if
protected by a UL listed fire door.






top posting corrected


Careful, this thread has gone into areas of techincally
correct but unnecessary "requirements" in more than one
post. Best thing to do is get the answer from the
horse's mouth, and begin at the local Code Enforcement
Office. Some things will be grandfathered, some won't,
sometimes IF you work on it you have to upgrade and
maybe something else, or if you sell it then ... and on
and on and on, and I forgot the Homeowner's Insurance
get involved, too if it's not to code. Only your CEO
will know for sure or at least have access to be able
to know for sure.

Pop



Pop,

What do you think the "local Code Enforcement Office" uses to administer
and enforce the codes 'locally'? To mention a few, ever heard of the
Uniform Building Code, International Building Code, International
Residential Code?

Among others, I've got all of those code books sitting on my desk for
referral. They *are* the horses mouth and are all or in part adopted by
governmental agencys/building departments/code enforcement departments
nationwide with regards to building codes and their enforcement of them.

When it comes to the "requirements and technicalities" regarding
housing, zoning, or public nuisance codes, as an ICBO, IBC, and CCEO
certified building, zoning, and code enforcement inspector I believe I
can give it from the horses mouth.

OTH if all I had to offer for advice was "maybe this or maybe that and
call your local inspector" then I would really have nothing to offer
here and I wouldn't.



Pop's statement was on the money. Different jurisdictions
can, and often will, alter the requirements of any national
code to suit their perceived needs. Your comment about a
layer of 5/8" type X would not meet the requirement for a
one hour fire separation if I recall correctly. I believe
that at least two layers of 5/8" type X is required to meet
the one hour separation. I spent 33 years in the fire
fighting and fire protection field and I don't recall one
layer meeting that requirement. I could be wrong,...it's
been a few years, and if I am, I apologize.

Waldo
  #10   Report Post  
Old May 13th 05, 09:37 PM
Goedjn
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 13 May 2005 11:28:08 -0700, G Henslee
wrote:

Pop wrote:




"G Henslee" wrote in message
...

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

The roof space of our 30-yr-old house is continuous.
I.e., there is no wall at all between the part above
the garage and the part above the living area.

Is that a Code violation? Should we think about
constructing a fireproof/fire-resistant barrier in
the roof?

Perce


To provide a one-hour fire resistive seperation
between the garage and the dwelling, install drywall
(5/8" type X) on the dividing wall between the garage
and house on the garage side extending up to the roof
sheathing, or drywall that same wall up and out on
the ceiling of the garage. Tape the joints.

Btw, openings between the garage and dwelling shall
be provided with a 1-3/8" solid wood or metal clad
door installed with a self-closing device. Openings
in one-hour resistive ceilings are permitted if
protected by a UL listed fire door.





top posting corrected


Careful, this thread has gone into areas of techincally
correct but unnecessary "requirements" in more than one
post. Best thing to do is get the answer from the
horse's mouth, and begin at the local Code Enforcement
Office. Some things will be grandfathered, some won't,
sometimes IF you work on it you have to upgrade and
maybe something else, or if you sell it then ... and on
and on and on, and I forgot the Homeowner's Insurance
get involved, too if it's not to code. Only your CEO
will know for sure or at least have access to be able
to know for sure.

Pop



Pop,

What do you think the "local Code Enforcement Office" uses to administer
and enforce the codes 'locally'? To mention a few, ever heard of the
Uniform Building Code, International Building Code, International
Residential Code?

Among others, I've got all of those code books sitting on my desk for
referral. They *are* the horses mouth and are all or in part adopted by
governmental agencys/building departments/code enforcement departments
nationwide with regards to building codes and their enforcement of them.

When it comes to the "requirements and technicalities" regarding
housing, zoning, or public nuisance codes, as an ICBO, IBC, and CCEO
certified building, zoning, and code enforcement inspector I believe I
can give it from the horses mouth.

OTH if all I had to offer for advice was "maybe this or maybe that and
call your local inspector" then I would really have nothing to offer
here and I wouldn't.




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