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Old May 5th 05, 08:21 PM
[email protected]
 
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Default Key broken off in Yale patio door lock... How to fix?

Hi,
We have sliding patio doors and the key has broken and is now stuck in
the main yale lock. I cannot remove the key. I cannot see how to remove
the lock.
This isn't urgent, it's been broken for months but with the summer
coming up I thought I'd better get it fixed!
Please can anyone advise on what I can do?
Many thanks,
Andy


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Old May 5th 05, 08:26 PM
Stormin Mormon
 
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Default

One option is to call a locksmith. While wearing my locksmith hat, I've
pulled a lot of broken keys.

--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
www.mormons.com


wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi,
We have sliding patio doors and the key has broken and is now stuck in
the main yale lock. I cannot remove the key. I cannot see how to remove
the lock.
This isn't urgent, it's been broken for months but with the summer
coming up I thought I'd better get it fixed!
Please can anyone advise on what I can do?
Many thanks,
Andy


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Old May 5th 05, 09:10 PM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Stormin Mormon" wrote in message
...
One option is to call a locksmith. While wearing my locksmith hat, I've
pulled a lot of broken keys.


Instead of calling a locksmith, could the OP just borrow your hat?


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Old May 5th 05, 09:28 PM
Gina and Les Armstrong
 
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Default


wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi,
We have sliding patio doors and the key has broken and is now stuck in
the main yale lock. I cannot remove the key. I cannot see how to remove
the lock.


I have fished a few out with a dental pick. You can find sets of picks in
catalogs and such. The picks are strong but flexible. You could also try a
very fine, narrow coping saw blade. Just snip off one end near the teeth to
remove the pin and slip it into the lock with the teeth pointing back
towards you. When you pull the blade out, the teeth might catch the broken
key and pull it out as well. YMMV.

Les


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Old May 5th 05, 10:43 PM
Stormin Mormon
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sure, 7 3/4. Hope it fits OK.

--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
www.mormons.com


"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message
news:[email protected]..

"Stormin Mormon" wrote in message
...
One option is to call a locksmith. While wearing my locksmith hat, I've
pulled a lot of broken keys.


Instead of calling a locksmith, could the OP just borrow your hat?





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Old May 6th 05, 12:33 AM
Richard J Kinch
 
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Default

Please can anyone advise on what I can do?

Even if you get the key out, the reason it stuck may be a faulty mechanism
that will just get the next one stuck.

Drill it out and replace the lock. The metals are soft; this isn't
difficult.
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Old May 6th 05, 12:37 AM
Doug Miller
 
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Default

In article , Richard J Kinch wrote:
Please can anyone advise on what I can do?


Even if you get the key out, the reason it stuck may be a faulty mechanism
that will just get the next one stuck.


Or it may be simply that the lock needs a bit of lubrication.

Drill it out and replace the lock. The metals are soft; this isn't
difficult.


That's just ridiculous. Get the key out, then lube the lock with powdered
graphite, or graphite in oil. There's no need to replace the lock.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt.
And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Old May 6th 05, 12:48 AM
Matt
 
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Default

Golly Doug, is there anything you can't do?

I'm so impressed!

Electrical, plumbing, runoff/drainage calculations, roofing, window
installation and repair, drywalling expert, gas piping expert, HVAC
expert, appliance guru, political pundit, and now .... LOCKSMITHING!

You are my hero!

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Old May 6th 05, 12:52 AM
Richard J Kinch
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Doug Miller writes:

Drill it out and replace the lock. The metals are soft; this isn't
difficult.


That's just ridiculous. Get the key out, then lube the lock with
powdered graphite, or graphite in oil. There's no need to replace the
lock.


I should have qualified, "given that getting the key out was not
practical," which I expect is the case.
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Old May 6th 05, 04:13 AM
Tom Miller
 
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Default

On 5 May 2005 12:21:14 -0700, wrote:

| Hi,
| We have sliding patio doors and the key has broken and is now stuck in
| the main yale lock. I cannot remove the key. I cannot see how to remove
| the lock.
| This isn't urgent, it's been broken for months but with the summer
| coming up I thought I'd better get it fixed!
| Please can anyone advise on what I can do?
| Many thanks,
| Andy
|


I have several hemostat forceps I once bought from a hobby supply.
They are normally used in surgery to clamp off blood vessels, but can
also be used in such things as model making and woodworking. I use
them occasionally when working on computers.

When a neighbor's key broke off in her door lock after she locked it,
I was able actually to reach into the keyhole with the hemostat, turn
the lock, and extract the key.

They make a good tool for this kind of situation. The hemostats are
very narrow and tapered, extremely strong, and have tips that have a
slight "gripper" filed into them. They also have a one-way lock built
into the handle allowing you to clamp something and lock the hemostat
onto it.

There are two kinds of hemostats, one curved at the tip and one
straight. Here's what they look like:

http://www.tedpella.com/dissect_html/53096.htm

I can't recall where I bought mine, but over the years I've used them
on various home repair projects many times where a needle-nosed pliers
would have been too big. Good for getting broken lightbulbs out of the
socket, fishing or pulling wire through tiny holes, picking up dropped
nuts and screws from inside appliances and computers, bending computer
parts slightly to fit, etc. Quite useful, especially the straight
ones.


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