Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Default Customer Issue

Hi,

if you do repairs for a living, you will sometimes have issues with particular customers. One scenario is when you are NOT dealing with the owner - but some middle man instead. Bad enough.

A worse one is when you do not know who the real owner is, cos someone who borrowed (and broke) the item brings it to you *pretending* to be the owner.

If they do not return to pick up and pay, anyone can then claim to be the owner and try to obtain the item for the repair cost.
So the first question you need to ask any new customer is:

" How long have you owned it ? "

And if their answer is non very convincing :

" Where did you you get it ? "

One does not what tot be stuck with items that never get picked up or are maybe stolen or where a dispute about ownership arises.

Happens.


........ Phil





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On 16/03/2021 8:43 am, Phil Allison wrote:
Hi,

if you do repairs for a living, you will sometimes have issues with particular customers. One scenario is when you are NOT dealing with the owner - but some middle man instead. Bad enough.

A worse one is when you do not know who the real owner is, cos someone who borrowed (and broke) the item brings it to you *pretending* to be the owner.

If they do not return to pick up and pay, anyone can then claim to be the owner and try to obtain the item for the repair cost.
So the first question you need to ask any new customer is:

" How long have you owned it ? "

And if their answer is non very convincing :

" Where did you you get it ?"

One does not what tot be stuck with items that never get picked up or are maybe stolen or where a dispute about ownership arises.

Happens.


....... Phil





Yup, working with the public is bad enough but include the muso's and
it's worse.
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You actually never know for sure you are dealing with the owner. Under most normal law the guy whose name is on your invoice is responsible one way or the other. It is he you answer to. However the problem comes if he OKs an estimate and you fix it then he abandons it.

I am not sure there but in Ohio they have tis consumer protection law that was started due to garages charging out the ass without an OK then demanding al that money - or they exercise the mechanic's lien on the car. The gist of it is if you fix it without their OK, you gave to give it to them fixed PLUS the repair charges, costs you double.

You are in a different country but I would look out for such a law because your government is, well how they is. I mean they disarmed the whole country because one guy went nuts and shot a bunch of people. You might want to have a talk with an attorney who deals with consumer law so you KNOW what the ****.

Now the flipside of the Ohio law is that when they OK the estimate thy enter into a binding contract. What that means is if you are waiting fro parts and it is not fixed is they demand to pick up the unit they must pay the bill done or not. Not one shop I ever worked for had the balls to use that, gutless mother****ers.

I can tell you this, customers are not always of the greatest moral character. I have seen so much **** and really I see no reason not to expect it there.

First of all the Wellman & Griffith we had customers who knew each other and actually bought the same model TV. Later we caught a couple trying to cheat on a repair warranty - this was off manufacturer's warranty. We fixed on, fie. Then it supposedly came back. Well there was al kinds of dust on the pins and solder of a part we supposedly replaced a couple of weeks before.

Another one, the guy got tired of waiting and sued us for the full new retail price of a RPTV that came in broken for one and was over ten years old. I said to countersue because any lawsuit is bad for business.

Then we got the case of the misplaced TV. We told them and were ready to make a settlement after a few ore days of searching. They sued for more than the thing was worth of course, and then we found it. The boss called them and let them know and they aid "OK, we'll drop that suit then, don't worry about it". Then they didn't - instead went in and got a default judgement.

So maybe, the trick is to require ID. Real owner walks in, give the the name and that who they sue. The sued pays the bill then the rightful owner gets the unit. Once you know about it, that unit goes nowhere until the court speaks.

I hate to be requiring ID for yet ANOTHER THING, but it seems it may be necessary. Some customers may actually appreciate it and see it as you acting to protect their unit.

Really though, if you loan something out and it is broken and repair, do you think you have the right to know ? I think you do. Like a car, loan it to them and they smash it but get it fixed real quick and you are not told, I think that is wrong.
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wrote:
--------------------------------------

You actually never know for sure you are dealing with the owner.


** Correct.

If you have doubts about ownership - ask for the estimated repair fee up front.

I do work for a second hand dealer, he has less problem with this.
Uncollected repairs get sold in his shop.



I can tell you this, customers are not always of the greatest moral character.


** Masterful understatement.


...... Phil
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Default Customer Issue

On Monday, March 15, 2021 at 8:43:20 PM UTC-4, wrote:
Hi,

if you do repairs for a living, you will sometimes have issues with particular customers. One scenario is when you are NOT dealing with the owner - but some middle man instead. Bad enough.

A worse one is when you do not know who the real owner is, cos someone who borrowed (and broke) the item brings it to you *pretending* to be the owner.

If they do not return to pick up and pay, anyone can then claim to be the owner and try to obtain the item for the repair cost.
So the first question you need to ask any new customer is:

" How long have you owned it ? "

And if their answer is non very convincing :

" Where did you you get it ? "

One does not what tot be stuck with items that never get picked up or are maybe stolen or where a dispute about ownership arises.

Happens.


....... Phil


I've been doing this over 45 years, and have seen pretty much everything. You develop another sense when people bring things in for repair. There are times I'll take in an item I suspect will be abandoned and not provide a claim check or receipt of any kind. They have the option of leaving it or taking it - I don't care.

Probably 15 years ago a guy brings in a 20" CRT TV for me to look at. Flats were what I was mostly repairing and a lot of these small CRT TVs never got picked up, repaired or otherwise. It had a smeary video but the OSC graphics were crisp and bright, so I knew it wouldn't be something easy like a CRT cathode bypass cap. But the TV was otherwise clean so I took it in and I told the guy I'd check it in a few days, and Sharpied (it's a verb) his name on the face of the tube. He wanted a receipt. I told him I don't provide them for items with a high probability of being abandoned since I had to hang on to them for at least six months. He said he wasn't going to leave it without one so I removed his name from the TV screen and headed out to his car with the TV. He was stunned, then furious and said he was going to call the dept. of consumer protection. Of course, never heard again from either.


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Default Customer Issue

wrote:
========================

if you do repairs for a living, you will sometimes have issues with particular customers. One scenario is when you are NOT dealing with the owner - but some middle man instead. Bad enough.

A worse one is when you do not know who the real owner is, cos someone who borrowed (and broke) the item brings it to you *pretending* to be the owner.

If they do not return to pick up and pay, anyone can then claim to be the owner and try to obtain the item for the repair cost.
So the first question you need to ask any new customer is:
" How long have you owned it ? "
And if their answer is non very convincing :
" Where did you you get it ? "
One does not what tot be stuck with items that never get picked up or are maybe stolen or where a dispute about ownership arises.

Happens.


I've been doing this over 45 years,


** Me slightly longer. Nearly all for musicians and the like.

Probably 15 years ago a guy brings in a 20" CRT TV for me to look at. Flats were what I was mostly repairing and a lot of these small CRT TVs never got picked up, repaired or otherwise. It had a smeary video but the OSC graphics were crisp and bright, so I knew it wouldn't be something easy like a CRT cathode bypass cap. But the TV was otherwise clean so I took it in and I told the guy I'd check it in a few days, and Sharpied (it's a verb) his name on the face of the tube. He wanted a receipt. I told him I don't provide them for items with a high probability of being abandoned since I had to hang on to them for at least six months. He said he wasn't going to leave it without one so I removed his name from the TV screen and headed out to his car with the TV. He was stunned, then furious and said he was going to call the dept. of consumer protection. Of course, never heard again from either.


----------------------------------------------------------------------
** LOL

I still have a Phase Linear 400-2 power amp that was abandoned in 1992.
When the owner removed it from his rack, he stole my ratchet screwdriver.
Never saw him again. The original repair bill was for $160.
Unfortunately, the front dress panel was missing, making it hard to sell.

I did mange to sell a Yamaha P2200 a few years back for slightly more than the repair bill.
It had belonged to a famous musician here in Sydney.


..... Phil

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On Tuesday, 23 March 2021 at 17:01:52 UTC-4, wrote:
wrote:
========================

if you do repairs for a living, you will sometimes have issues with particular customers. One scenario is when you are NOT dealing with the owner - but some middle man instead. Bad enough.

A worse one is when you do not know who the real owner is, cos someone who borrowed (and broke) the item brings it to you *pretending* to be the owner.

If they do not return to pick up and pay, anyone can then claim to be the owner and try to obtain the item for the repair cost.
So the first question you need to ask any new customer is:
" How long have you owned it ? "
And if their answer is non very convincing :
" Where did you you get it ? "
One does not what tot be stuck with items that never get picked up or are maybe stolen or where a dispute about ownership arises.
Happens.


I've been doing this over 45 years,

** Me slightly longer. Nearly all for musicians and the like.
Probably 15 years ago a guy brings in a 20" CRT TV for me to look at. Flats were what I was mostly repairing and a lot of these small CRT TVs never got picked up, repaired or otherwise. It had a smeary video but the OSC graphics were crisp and bright, so I knew it wouldn't be something easy like a CRT cathode bypass cap. But the TV was otherwise clean so I took it in and I told the guy I'd check it in a few days, and Sharpied (it's a verb) his name on the face of the tube. He wanted a receipt. I told him I don't provide them for items with a high probability of being abandoned since I had to hang on to them for at least six months. He said he wasn't going to leave it without one so I removed his name from the TV screen and headed out to his car with the TV. He was stunned, then furious and said he was going to call the dept. of consumer protection. Of course, never heard again from either.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
** LOL

I still have a Phase Linear 400-2 power amp that was abandoned in 1992.
When the owner removed it from his rack, he stole my ratchet screwdriver.
Never saw him again. The original repair bill was for $160.
Unfortunately, the front dress panel was missing, making it hard to sell.

I did mange to sell a Yamaha P2200 a few years back for slightly more than the repair bill.
It had belonged to a famous musician here in Sydney.


.... Phil


I too had a receiver abandoned for over 1-1/2 years. I was required to keep it for a year. Finally sold it for a nice profit. 1 week later, the original owner shows up looking for it. Told him it was sold. Got angry and indicated the police would soon be at my door. Told him to check with a lawyer first so it wouldn't cost him too much and never saw him again...
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On Wednesday, March 24, 2021 at 7:11:34 AM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tuesday, 23 March 2021 at 17:01:52 UTC-4, wrote:
wrote:
========================

if you do repairs for a living, you will sometimes have issues with particular customers. One scenario is when you are NOT dealing with the owner - but some middle man instead. Bad enough.

A worse one is when you do not know who the real owner is, cos someone who borrowed (and broke) the item brings it to you *pretending* to be the owner.

If they do not return to pick up and pay, anyone can then claim to be the owner and try to obtain the item for the repair cost.
So the first question you need to ask any new customer is:
" How long have you owned it ? "
And if their answer is non very convincing :
" Where did you you get it ? "
One does not what tot be stuck with items that never get picked up or are maybe stolen or where a dispute about ownership arises.
Happens.


I've been doing this over 45 years,

** Me slightly longer. Nearly all for musicians and the like.
Probably 15 years ago a guy brings in a 20" CRT TV for me to look at. Flats were what I was mostly repairing and a lot of these small CRT TVs never got picked up, repaired or otherwise. It had a smeary video but the OSC graphics were crisp and bright, so I knew it wouldn't be something easy like a CRT cathode bypass cap. But the TV was otherwise clean so I took it in and I told the guy I'd check it in a few days, and Sharpied (it's a verb) his name on the face of the tube. He wanted a receipt. I told him I don't provide them for items with a high probability of being abandoned since I had to hang on to them for at least six months. He said he wasn't going to leave it without one so I removed his name from the TV screen and headed out to his car with the TV. He was stunned, then furious and said he was going to call the dept. of consumer protection. Of course, never heard again from either.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
** LOL

I still have a Phase Linear 400-2 power amp that was abandoned in 1992.
When the owner removed it from his rack, he stole my ratchet screwdriver.
Never saw him again. The original repair bill was for $160.
Unfortunately, the front dress panel was missing, making it hard to sell.

I did mange to sell a Yamaha P2200 a few years back for slightly more than the repair bill.
It had belonged to a famous musician here in Sydney.


.... Phil

I too had a receiver abandoned for over 1-1/2 years. I was required to keep it for a year. Finally sold it for a nice profit. 1 week later, the original owner shows up looking for it. Told him it was sold. Got angry and indicated the police would soon be at my door. Told him to check with a lawyer first so it wouldn't cost him too much and never saw him again...


Hmm.. back in the 80s, I repaired a very nice high end cassette recorder (Teac?), and it sat for over a year. I brought it home and installed it in my system to make cassettes for my cars. 6 months later the guy shows up and wanted to pick it up. I told him sure, it was $x and I'd get it out of storage when he paid for it. He said he'd be back Monday with the money. Never saw him again. I'm positive his plan was to sue for the cost of the deck if I disposed of it.

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