Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Old December 24th 20, 07:47 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Removing dried WD-40

On Sunday, September 13, 2020 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 9/12/20 11:26 AM, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
So, my question is how do you remove it?

Using a siphon sprayer, I sprayed, in sequence, mineral spirits to
cut through the WD-40 gunk. Then hosed it with Simple Green to
finish de-greasing it. Followed by Distilled water to flush out the
Simple Green and finally denatured alcohol to get rid of the water.

I'd say it came out pretty clean.
https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/685910956580405312/754506691353116722/unknown.png


Alcohol can etch aluminum, marble, limestone, travertine and certain granites and it can remove plastics and various forms of carbon (like from valves).

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Old December 24th 20, 09:19 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Removing dried WD-40

a} Please read the MSDS for WD40. It is 100% volatile. Really.
b) The nasty, sticky skunge 'left behind' by WD40 is not from the WD40, but what was re-distributed by the WD40 all over everything.
c) How to get rid of it: There are various solvents that are quite effective depending on the substrate. Brake Cleaner is one. Carburetor Cleaner is another - again, depending on the substrate. There are many others. Ans there is always the dishwasher.
d) First-cause was not enough WD40 in the first place, sufficient to both dissolve and then rinse off the skunge.
e) WD40 is neither a lubricant, nor an anti-oxidant, nor a cleaner, nor much of anything else other than a material designed to displace water. And it does that exceedingly well. All the other 'off-label' stuff is much like adding aspirin, chelated iron and Karo syrup to Christmas Tree water. Does it work?

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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Old December 24th 20, 10:16 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Removing dried WD-40

On Thursday, December 24, 2020 at 3:19:47 PM UTC-5, Peter W. wrote:
a} Please read the MSDS for WD40. It is 100% volatile. Really.
b) The nasty, sticky skunge 'left behind' by WD40 is not from the WD40, but what was re-distributed by the WD40 all over everything.
c) How to get rid of it: There are various solvents that are quite effective depending on the substrate. Brake Cleaner is one. Carburetor Cleaner is another - again, depending on the substrate. There are many others. Ans there is always the dishwasher.
d) First-cause was not enough WD40 in the first place, sufficient to both dissolve and then rinse off the skunge.
e) WD40 is neither a lubricant, nor an anti-oxidant, nor a cleaner, nor much of anything else other than a material designed to displace water. And it does that exceedingly well. All the other 'off-label' stuff is much like adding aspirin, chelated iron and Karo syrup to Christmas Tree water. Does it work?
Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


Here's what bothers me about WD40 despite what the MSDS says. I've used it where there was no previous lubricant, and found later than it crusted over. I used it twice, once on an HDMI connector on the back of a bluray and the other on a micro USB connector on a wifi extender, both a bit touchy due to contact issues. Yes, I know it's not a contact preservative but any clean lube works fine off label. Several months later, both quit working. Removing the connectors revealed white crusty material on both the connector and inside the cables. I ended up using WD to flush out the crusties and then flushed out the WD with Free All. No more problems.

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Old December 25th 20, 05:41 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Removing dried WD-40

Peter ****** Raving Luantic & Pig wrote:

===================================
a} Please read the MSDS for WD40. It is 100% volatile. Really.


** Pedantic tripe - like every post from the trolling nutter.

e) WD40 is neither a lubricant,


** Contains lots of light oil.

nor an anti-oxidant,


** The oil layer keeps oxygen and water at bay so it does that job.

nor a cleaner,


** Dissolves greases and many other things in an instant.

nor much of anything else other than a material designed to displace water.


** Very rarely used it for that.

But it does kill cockroaches pretty quick.


...... Phil




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Old December 26th 20, 01:01 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Removing dried WD-40

Yo, Drongo:

I waited until after Christmas - my bad. But as a New Year's present, I wish to reassure you that your position as Village Idiot is secure. You DO NOT have to compete for it.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park. PA


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