Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Old January 18th 19, 10:30 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 20:57:50 +0000, Cursitor Doom wrote:

It's amazing the amount of perfectly good stuff that gets junked just
for the want of a part costing a few pennies. That's the thing these
days; too many people just go and buy another one.

These days too many people have no experience of building anything -
didn't have Meccano/Erector sets, let alone built model aircraft or
crystal sets, so have no clue about making or fixing things.

Dyson relevance: I have an original Dyson 05 cylinder model. After a year
or three the surprisingly weak green clip at the bottom of the wand
broke. A pivot came off one side of the catch. Being a long-time model
builder and flyer, I naturally stuck a 3mm drill through the pivots,
fitted a suitable length of 3mm OD brass tube and added epoxy to keep it
in place. 25-30 years later the Dyson is still working well, which is
more than I could say about the couple of Mr. Henry's it replaced.


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Old January 18th 19, 10:53 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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On 1/18/19 3:57 PM, Cursitor Doom wrote:

A family member living an a wealthy American suburb says he has picked
up numerous Dysons left by the curb for the trash or recycling
collectors -- and all that was wrong with them was that the filter
needed cleaning.


It's amazing the amount of perfectly good stuff that gets junked just for
the want of a part costing a few pennies. That's the thing these days;
too many people just go and buy another one.


Undoubtedly true, but not all parts do cost just a few pennies. E.g.,
today I saw that one little electronic module for our Maytag dryer sells
for $358 -- and I'm not sure we paid much more than $400 for the whole
appliance about three years ago. I'm glad I don't need one: I just
happened to notice it while looking for something else.

Perce

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Old January 19th 19, 12:13 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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On Friday, 18 January 2019 21:57:11 UTC, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
On 1/18/19 3:57 PM, Cursitor Doom wrote:

A family member living an a wealthy American suburb says he has picked
up numerous Dysons left by the curb for the trash or recycling
collectors -- and all that was wrong with them was that the filter
needed cleaning.


It's amazing the amount of perfectly good stuff that gets junked just for
the want of a part costing a few pennies. That's the thing these days;
too many people just go and buy another one.


Undoubtedly true, but not all parts do cost just a few pennies. E.g.,
today I saw that one little electronic module for our Maytag dryer sells
for $358 -- and I'm not sure we paid much more than $400 for the whole
appliance about three years ago. I'm glad I don't need one: I just
happened to notice it while looking for something else.

Perce


Of course from the dump it costs nothing like that.


NT
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Old January 19th 19, 01:34 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 16:53:35 -0500, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Undoubtedly true, but not all parts do cost just a few pennies. E.g.,
today I saw that one little electronic module for our Maytag dryer sells
for $358 -- and I'm not sure we paid much more than $400 for the whole
appliance about three years ago. I'm glad I don't need one: I just
happened to notice it while looking for something else.


I'll wager the actual component(s) that failed within that module could
have been replaced for pennies, though. $358 is outrageous for probably
in total no more than 10 bucks worth of bits.





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Old January 19th 19, 04:20 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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On Friday, January 18, 2019 at 7:34:32 PM UTC-5, Cursitor Doom wrote:
On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 16:53:35 -0500, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Undoubtedly true, but not all parts do cost just a few pennies. E.g.,
today I saw that one little electronic module for our Maytag dryer sells
for $358 -- and I'm not sure we paid much more than $400 for the whole
appliance about three years ago. I'm glad I don't need one: I just
happened to notice it while looking for something else.


I'll wager the actual component(s) that failed within that module could
have been replaced for pennies, though. $358 is outrageous for probably
in total no more than 10 bucks worth of bits.



Believe it or not, a lot of those appliance modules have high ESR caps causing issues, and they are usually smaller value caps that don't present themselves with a vented top or bottom. But a lot of them have bad processors or support circuitry, and there's no schematic for the board or datasheets available for most ICs that are house numbered, so they can be problematic to fix.

But yeah, most of those boards are worth $150 tops.


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Old January 19th 19, 04:47 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Martin Gregorie:

I watch almost as much TV as the average person,
and see print ads in magazines and newspapers, but
honestly I became aware of Dyson products only less
than ten years ago. I had no idea Dyson was that
old!
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Old January 19th 19, 01:09 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 19:47:13 -0800, thekmanrocks wrote:

Martin Gregorie:

I watch almost as much TV as the average person, and see print ads in
magazines and newspapers, but honestly I became aware of Dyson products
only less than ten years ago. I had no idea Dyson was that old!


Dyson was founded 1991, so my memory slipped a bit. My home accounting
system shows I bought my DC05 Dyson in 2001 and did that repair in 2013.


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Old January 19th 19, 02:59 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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On Saturday, 19 January 2019 04:13:03 UTC, Ralph Mowery wrote:
In article ,
says...

It's amazing the amount of perfectly good stuff that gets junked just for
the want of a part costing a few pennies. That's the thing these days;
too many people just go and buy another one.


Undoubtedly true, but not all parts do cost just a few pennies. E.g.,
today I saw that one little electronic module for our Maytag dryer sells
for $358 -- and I'm not sure we paid much more than $400 for the whole
appliance about three years ago. I'm glad I don't need one: I just
happened to notice it while looking for something else.




There seems to be 2 problems now.

Many younger people do not know how to repair things. All they do is
play video games and text each other. When I grew up there were many
'toys' that taught things. Crystal radios, erector sets, chemical sets
that could blow up things.

The second is often replacement parts cost way too much.

If taken to a repair place by the time the parts are bought and the cost
of the time of the repairman is added, you can often get a new and
improved modle.

Just like some warrenties, they want about 1/4 the cost of a new item
that is less than $ 100.


OTOH there's an endless stream of chucked out stuff that's worth youngster's time repairing. But few parents have the expertise or time to show them how - or even realise it's doable.


NT
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