Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Fixing old car battery charger. Do not want to buy new one because I need the 6 volt capability for my vintage motorcycle.

Need to replace a "button style" (Motorola MR2506) rectifier with a "stud mounted" one (Motorola 1N1190A) The stud mounted on has a higher rating.
Question: Data sheet says button battery cathode marked by "dot". Dot no longer visible on installed parts. Is it safe to assume that the wires from the transformer secondary lead to the Anode and the body of the "button style" (cathode) is pressed into the aluminum plate?
Thank you for your help.

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On 4/29/2018 11:41 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Fixing old car battery charger. Do not want to buy new one because I need the 6 volt capability for my vintage motorcycle.

Need to replace a "button style" (Motorola MR2506) rectifier with a "stud mounted" one (Motorola 1N1190A) The stud mounted on has a higher rating.
Question: Data sheet says button battery cathode marked by "dot". Dot no longer visible on installed parts. Is it safe to assume that the wires from the transformer secondary lead to the Anode and the body of the "button style" (cathode) is pressed into the aluminum plate?
Thank you for your help.


Do you know the make and model of the charger?
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On 30/04/2018 2:41 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Fixing old car battery charger. Do not want to buy new one because I need the 6 volt capability for my vintage motorcycle.

Need to replace a "button style" (Motorola MR2506) rectifier with a "stud mounted" one (Motorola 1N1190A) The stud mounted on has a higher rating.
Question: Data sheet says button battery cathode marked by "dot". Dot no longer visible on installed parts. Is it safe to assume that the wires from the transformer secondary lead to the Anode and the body of the "button style" (cathode) is pressed into the aluminum plate?
Thank you for your help.


Only 1 transformer wire goes to the diode, the other elsewhere probably
an output terminal.
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On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 2:41:26 AM UTC-4, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Fixing old car battery charger. Do not want to buy new one because I need the 6 volt capability for my vintage motorcycle.

Need to replace a "button style" (Motorola MR2506) rectifier with a "stud mounted" one (Motorola 1N1190A) The stud mounted on has a higher rating.
Question: Data sheet says button battery cathode marked by "dot". Dot no longer visible on installed parts. Is it safe to assume that the wires from the transformer secondary lead to the Anode and the body of the "button style" (cathode) is pressed into the aluminum plate?
Thank you for your help.


The couple I putzed around with had two rectifiers. If there's another, check that. In any case, the cathode should go towards the positive lead.
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Mike, the model is a Schauer CR612
2 button diodes. Case bonded to copper plate, lead goes to xformer.
On replacement diode (1N1190A) case is cathode.


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Reilly, both diodes have a removable lead going to the xformer. The bodies are press fit into a copper plate. Do I simply unplug and check for current direction with ohmeter?
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On Monday, 30 April 2018 07:41:26 UTC+1, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Fixing old car battery charger. Do not want to buy new one because I need the 6 volt capability for my vintage motorcycle.

Need to replace a "button style" (Motorola MR2506) rectifier with a "stud mounted" one (Motorola 1N1190A) The stud mounted on has a higher rating.
Question: Data sheet says button battery cathode marked by "dot". Dot no longer visible on installed parts. Is it safe to assume that the wires from the transformer secondary lead to the Anode and the body of the "button style" (cathode) is pressed into the aluminum plate?
Thank you for your help.


can you not work it out by following wires & using a multimeter? Old chargers are exceedingly simple.


NT
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On 30-4-2018 8:41, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Fixing old car battery charger. Do not want to buy new one because I need the 6 volt capability for my vintage motorcycle.

Need to replace a "button style" (Motorola MR2506) rectifier with a "stud mounted" one (Motorola 1N1190A) The stud mounted on has a higher rating.
Question: Data sheet says button battery cathode marked by "dot". Dot no longer visible on installed parts. Is it safe to assume that the wires from the transformer secondary lead to the Anode and the body of the "button style" (cathode) is pressed into the aluminum plate?
Thank you for your help.

Just put it in, and then load the charger with a 12 volt headlight.
Then check polarity, and flip the rectifier connections if the polarity
is wrong.
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On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 10:23:34 AM UTC-7, Sjouke Burry wrote:
On 30-4-2018 8:41, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Fixing old car battery charger. Do not want to buy new one because I need the 6 volt capability for my vintage motorcycle.

Need to replace a "button style" (Motorola MR2506) rectifier with a "stud mounted" one (Motorola 1N1190A) The stud mounted on has a higher rating..
Question: Data sheet says button battery cathode marked by "dot". Dot no longer visible on installed parts. Is it safe to assume that the wires from the transformer secondary lead to the Anode and the body of the "button style" (cathode) is pressed into the aluminum plate?
Thank you for your help.

Just put it in, and then load the charger with a 12 volt headlight.
Then check polarity, and flip the rectifier connections if the polarity
is wrong.


Thanks all !!! Problem solved.
Disconnected good diode from circuit, tested and determined that the anode is connected to the transformer and the cathode is pressed on to the metal plate. Will order the 1N1190A stud bolt replacement. Inexpensive, probably less than the shipping cost.
Thanks again !
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On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 1:40:48 PM UTC-4, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 10:23:34 AM UTC-7, Sjouke Burry wrote:
On 30-4-2018 8:41, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Fixing old car battery charger. Do not want to buy new one because I need the 6 volt capability for my vintage motorcycle.

Need to replace a "button style" (Motorola MR2506) rectifier with a "stud mounted" one (Motorola 1N1190A) The stud mounted on has a higher rating.
Question: Data sheet says button battery cathode marked by "dot". Dot no longer visible on installed parts. Is it safe to assume that the wires from the transformer secondary lead to the Anode and the body of the "button style" (cathode) is pressed into the aluminum plate?
Thank you for your help.

Just put it in, and then load the charger with a 12 volt headlight.
Then check polarity, and flip the rectifier connections if the polarity
is wrong.


Thanks all !!! Problem solved.
Disconnected good diode from circuit, tested and determined that the anode is connected to the transformer and the cathode is pressed on to the metal plate. Will order the 1N1190A stud bolt replacement. Inexpensive, probably less than the shipping cost.
Thanks again !



Just make sure the diode you get is polarized the same. IIRC, those stud rectifiers were available with reverse polarity if ordered that way. Who knows if any of those made their way to the secondary parts market.



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On Monday, 30 April 2018 18:40:48 UTC+1, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 10:23:34 AM UTC-7, Sjouke Burry wrote:
On 30-4-2018 8:41, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Fixing old car battery charger. Do not want to buy new one because I need the 6 volt capability for my vintage motorcycle.

Need to replace a "button style" (Motorola MR2506) rectifier with a "stud mounted" one (Motorola 1N1190A) The stud mounted on has a higher rating.
Question: Data sheet says button battery cathode marked by "dot". Dot no longer visible on installed parts. Is it safe to assume that the wires from the transformer secondary lead to the Anode and the body of the "button style" (cathode) is pressed into the aluminum plate?
Thank you for your help.

Just put it in, and then load the charger with a 12 volt headlight.
Then check polarity, and flip the rectifier connections if the polarity
is wrong.


Thanks all !!! Problem solved.
Disconnected good diode from circuit, tested and determined that the anode is connected to the transformer and the cathode is pressed on to the metal plate. Will order the 1N1190A stud bolt replacement. Inexpensive, probably less than the shipping cost.
Thanks again !


In future you should keep at least 1 high current smpsu in your junk to get high i diodes from


NT
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"Ivan Vegvary" wrote in message
...
Fixing old car battery charger. Do not want to buy new one because I need
the 6 volt capability for my vintage motorcycle.

Need to replace a "button style" (Motorola MR2506) rectifier with a "stud
mounted" one (Motorola 1N1190A) The stud mounted on has a higher rating.
Question: Data sheet says button battery cathode marked by "dot". Dot no
longer visible on installed parts. Is it safe to assume that the wires
from the transformer secondary lead to the Anode and the body of the
"button style" (cathode) is pressed into the aluminum plate?
Thank you for your help.


In the UK, we have discount stores like Aldi & Lidl that do time limited
offers, battery chargers come around from time to time and sometimes they're
6V capable.

The David Silver Honda parts specialist allegedly has 6V capable Honda
branded Optimate chargers - but never on any of the occasions I tried to
order one.

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On 30/04/2018 8:39 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Reilly, both diodes have a removable lead going to the xformer. The bodies are press fit into a copper plate. Do I simply unplug and check for current direction with ohmeter?

Sounds like a half wave rectifier, there would be 3 wires from the
tranny. If the diodes are the same you would need to make sure they were
the same polarity as the previous diodes.
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On 5/1/18 6:13 AM, Unlisted wrote:
For a battery charger, you do NOT want a silicone rectifier, you want a
SELENIUM rectifier. Silicone diodes are far too flimsy and cant handle
the current load. Selenium rectifiers are made to handle all the current
you can pump thru them. and are made to be abused without failing.


Good Lord, what ****ing rock have you been asleep under for the past
fifty year?


--
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
WA6FWi
http:foxsmercantile.com
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On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 7:46:43 AM UTC-4, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 5/1/18 6:13 AM, Unlisted wrote:
For a battery charger, you do NOT want a silicone rectifier, you want a
SELENIUM rectifier. Silicone diodes are far too flimsy and cant handle
the current load. Selenium rectifiers are made to handle all the current
you can pump thru them. and are made to be abused without failing.


Good Lord, what ****ing rock have you been asleep under for the past
fifty year?



Are you saying the advice to use selenium rectifiers "stinks"?



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On 1/05/2018 11:20 PM, John-Del wrote:
On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 7:46:43 AM UTC-4, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 5/1/18 6:13 AM, Unlisted wrote:
For a battery charger, you do NOT want a silicone rectifier, you want a
SELENIUM rectifier. Silicone diodes are far too flimsy and cant handle
the current load. Selenium rectifiers are made to handle all the current
you can pump thru them. and are made to be abused without failing.


Good Lord, what ****ing rock have you been asleep under for the past
fifty year?



Are you saying the advice to use selenium rectifiers "stinks"?

Heh, at least they had their own heatsinks :-)
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"John-Del" wrote in message
...
On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 7:46:43 AM UTC-4, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 5/1/18 6:13 AM, Unlisted wrote:
For a battery charger, you do NOT want a silicone rectifier, you want a
SELENIUM rectifier. Silicone diodes are far too flimsy and cant handle
the current load. Selenium rectifiers are made to handle all the
current
you can pump thru them. and are made to be abused without failing.


Good Lord, what ****ing rock have you been asleep under for the past
fifty year?



Are you saying the advice to use selenium rectifiers "stinks"?



Rotten fish mostly.................


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On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 11:20:37 AM UTC-4, John-Del wrote:
On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 7:46:43 AM UTC-4, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 5/1/18 6:13 AM, Unlisted wrote:
For a battery charger, you do NOT want a silicone rectifier, you want a
SELENIUM rectifier. Silicone diodes are far too flimsy and cant handle
the current load. Selenium rectifiers are made to handle all the current
you can pump thru them. and are made to be abused without failing.


Good Lord, what ****ing rock have you been asleep under for the past
fifty year?


Are you saying the advice to use selenium rectifiers "stinks"?


Well then, are you insinuating that the advice to use silicon rectifiers "stinks"?
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On Thursday, May 31, 2018 at 5:38:06 AM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 11:20:37 AM UTC-4, John-Del wrote:
On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 7:46:43 AM UTC-4, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 5/1/18 6:13 AM, Unlisted wrote:
For a battery charger, you do NOT want a silicone rectifier, you want a
SELENIUM rectifier. Silicone diodes are far too flimsy and cant handle
the current load. Selenium rectifiers are made to handle all the current
you can pump thru them. and are made to be abused without failing.

Good Lord, what ****ing rock have you been asleep under for the past
fifty year?


Are you saying the advice to use selenium rectifiers "stinks"?


Well then, are you insinuating that the advice to use silicon rectifiers "stinks"?


Perhaps I was just asking him to confirm or otherwise expand on his statement against using selenium in this application, or (more likely) was that I was tweaking the old guys in this forum who remember exactly what odoriferous emanations a selenium rectifier provides as evidence of it's failure..

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On 31/05/2018 7:32 PM, John-Del wrote:
On Thursday, May 31, 2018 at 5:38:06 AM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 11:20:37 AM UTC-4, John-Del wrote:
On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 7:46:43 AM UTC-4, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 5/1/18 6:13 AM, Unlisted wrote:
For a battery charger, you do NOT want a silicone rectifier, you want a
SELENIUM rectifier. Silicone diodes are far too flimsy and cant handle
the current load. Selenium rectifiers are made to handle all the current
you can pump thru them. and are made to be abused without failing.

Good Lord, what ****ing rock have you been asleep under for the past
fifty year?

Are you saying the advice to use selenium rectifiers "stinks"?


Well then, are you insinuating that the advice to use silicon rectifiers "stinks"?


Perhaps I was just asking him to confirm or otherwise expand on his statement against using selenium in this application, or (more likely) was that I was tweaking the old guys in this forum who remember exactly what odoriferous emanations a selenium rectifier provides as evidence of it's failure..


Golly I hope we can get this all cleared for peoples state of mind !!


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