Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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I have an electric guitar. It has a 4 position switch that selects which
of the three pickups, or all of them. There is a piece of metal that
sticks up, which is supposed to have a knob on it. Knob was missing.
Besides appearance, that metal shaft is sharp and dont feel good on the
hand.

But this is not your typical round shaft, it's a flat piece of metal
about 1/4" wide and 1/32 inch thick. So the knob will have a slit in it.
The guitar is a Silvertone from probably the 1970s, so I wont likely
find an original knob. But I am not all that picky about getting an
original, as long as I can get something that fits.

I did call a music store and was told that they will check what they
have, but said he doubts they have anything. (Will call me back). So it
looks like I am gonna have to fidn something at an electronics store or
ebay. My question is *What do you call this sort of knob*? I dont know
what words to search for.


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On Thu, 01 Mar 2018 03:54:03 -0600, wrote:

If you google "guitar lever switch" and than "images" you would find a
dogpile of switches, few of which are for guitar pickups.
https://goo.gl/UUhUaY

My question is *What do you call this sort of knob*? I dont know
what words to search for.

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On Thursday, March 1, 2018 at 4:56:39 AM UTC-5, wrote:

My question is *What do you call this sort of knob*?


It's called a knob...

Probably a knob from a Strat or Tele will fit. Bring the guitar to the music store; I'm sure they have a box o' knobs you can rifle through.

The best news is that if they're old knobs, they're not made in China...


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Google "guitar pickup knob" and you will see a plethora of knobs that will fit your application.

Oh wait...... google...... never mind.

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wrote:

---------------------------

I have an electric guitar. It has a 4 position switch that selects which
of the three pickups, or all of them. There is a piece of metal that
sticks up, which is supposed to have a knob on it. Knob was missing.
Besides appearance, that metal shaft is sharp and dont feel good on the
hand.

But this is not your typical round shaft, it's a flat piece of metal
about 1/4" wide and 1/32 inch thick. So the knob will have a slit in it.
The guitar is a Silvertone from probably the 1970s, so I wont likely
find an original knob. But I am not all that picky about getting an
original, as long as I can get something that fits.



** Guitars are often fitted with multi-way LEVER switches, like the one you describe.

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Yibu...752649710.html

May have 3,4 or 5 ways depending on the number of PUs while some use 2-way toggles - often with a centre, double ON position that caters for 2 PUs.
Lever types are quicker for the player to use than a rotary switch and the position easily identified by finger tips alone.

The push-fit knob is similar to ones used with slider controls, particularly those fitted closely spaced on graphic equalisers.

Making a small, grub screw knob secure by packing the gaps as another suggests sounds good if you don't mind putting in the time.


IME, repairing broken & bent shaft pots on guitar amps is part of a great many jobs. Sometimes 1980s Marshalls turn up with the whole lot visibly damaged.

Then there are the 2000 series where the flimsy plastic pots look OK but work intermittently.....



..... Phil

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On Thu, 1 Mar 2018 21:50:15 -0600, "Dave M"
wrote:

Take a look at the knobs on eBay (item number:162919395802). Probably the
ones you are looking for. I see that this listing only has 3 available. If
you only need one, then you should be good to go.

Cheers,
Dave M
(I'm from the old school too)


Thanks Dave,

That sure does look like the one I need.



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On Saturday, 3 March 2018 07:50:28 UTC, wrote:

Unlike you, I am an AMERICAN.
Americans use Inches, feet, yards and miles.

We dont use no goddamn communistic metrics. The only Meters we use are
the ones connected to the wires that enter our homes from the electric
power company, or the ones for the gas or water entering our homes.

Using Metrics in America is like hanging a Nazi flag in front of city
hall. It's unpatriotic, unAmerican, and politically incorrect. It's like
sending someone to their death based on the color of their skin or their
religious beliefs.

Our red - white and blue Flags have 50 stars. Each is one inch in size.
Our Apple Pies are measured in inches, not centipedes
Out liquor comes in pints, quarts, fifths, and gallons. We drink that
while proudly raising the American flag, before a Football game.
Yes, that's FOOTball, not no stinking commie Milimeter ball. The game is
played on a football field measured in YARDS, not no damn commie Meters.
And we drive at 55 Miles per hour, to the games in our AMERICAN made
Chevrolets, Fords, and Chrysler cars.

I need a caliper that messures in Thousandths, (of a Red - White and
Blue AMERICAN Inch).

May God damn those who use Metrics.

God Bless America.

Thank God I'm a country boy!!!


No-one tell him that metres are French


NT
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That just might be the most asinine rant I've read to date.


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On 3/3/18 9:51 AM, Terry Schwartz wrote:
That just might be the most asinine rant I've read to date.


As I said "You never cease to amaze me with the depth of your
ignorance."


--
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Jeff-1.0
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Lemme see:

The Metric system was "invented" in 1670, in France. This was well before Communism, at that point "Protestantism" was a dirty word in many sectors.

The US auto industry has largely adopted the Metric system so as to compete world-wide, and to standardize parts.

Pretty much anyone with even half-a-brain that has done much of anything with tools over the last 40 years will be fluent in both currencies. Some years ago, I was working as a machinist making parts for GE for their engines. About half the shop used metric tools (shaft diameters, fasteners) and half the shop was using SAE standards (flange widths and thicknesses, fastener spacing). See, we were selling parts to European and Japanese GE license holders, as well as sub-assembly consolidators.

As to KM vs. Miles - sheesh! I have driven in 8 countries on three continents. Only one uses MPH. One is courteous enough to put up the signs in both in many locations (Saudi), and one does so on main highways (Both of them - Bahrain). It is _REALLY_ hard to remember that 62.5 MPH = 100 KPH, and that 75 MPH = 120 KPH. And so on and so forth.

And, are you offended to know that we are using Old Arabic Numerals for our numbers, and Italian (Latin) letters? And it was the Arabs that gave us the 0 (zero), allowing modern calculations?

When it comes to the terms & tools used for the communication of mathematics and language, we AMERICANS have not contributed much at all. Be glad that you are not British, as you would have to contend with the Whitworth standard in addition. That would likely cause your brain to explode.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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On 3/3/2018 9:43 AM, M Philbrook wrote:
In article ,
says...



I'm shorter, but just by a **** hair.


I think a "**** hair" is a universal metric, one that most of us
understand..


But was it a blonde, brunette, or red **** hair?

RwP

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On 3/3/18 1:32 PM, Chuck wrote:
On Sat, 03 Mar 2018 01:47:30 -0600, wrote:

Thank God I'm a country boy!!!

I hope this is satirical.


Unfortunately it was not.
It was posted in all seriousness, because he truly believes it.



--
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Jeff-1.0
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http:foxsmercantile.com


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On 3/3/18 7:04 PM, ~misfit~ wrote:
Oh and 'this knob' is .


I thought the phrase was "Bell end."


--
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Jeff-1.0
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On Sat, 03 Mar 2018 13:32:56 -0600, Chuck wrote:

May God damn those who use Metrics.

God Bless America.

Thank God I'm a country boy!!!

I hope this is satirical.

---


"Okie From Muskogee" (Anti-metric edition)

We don't smoke marijuana in Muskogee;
We don't take no trips on LSD
We don't burn no draft cards down on Main Street;
We like livin' right, and bein' free.

I'm proud to be an Okie from Muskogee,
A place where even squares can have a ball
We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
And white lightnin's still the biggest thrill of all

We don't make a party out of lovin';
We like holdin' hands and pitchin' woo;
We don't let our hair grow long and shaggy,
Like the hippies out in San Francisco do.

And I'm proud to be an Okie from Muskogee,
A place where even squares can have a ball.
We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
And white lightnin's still the biggest thrill of all.

Leather boots are still in style for manly footwear;
Beads and Roman sandals won't be seen.
Football's still the roughest thing on campus,
And the kids here still respect the college dean.

******
We dont use no commie metrics in Muskogee,
Our tape measures only read inches and feet.
Our prom queen is a perfect 38-24-36 inches,
We still spin 45rpm records to feel the beat.
*******

We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
In Muskogee, Oklahoma, USA.


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On 3/4/18 7:12 AM, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
Don't attribute words to Merle,
He was enough of an asshole without your help.


Kinky knew this. We all knew this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n__tAHR5ErM


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http:foxsmercantile.com


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Oh, I dunno - anyone smitten with a system based on the width of the (Roman) emperor's thumb some several thousand years ago deserves pity.

All and at the same time, the last time I saw Merle in concert (as an opener for Leo Kottke of all things!) he was a tired old man with neither vinegar nor **** remaining, and not much of his voice. It was a small room, and entirely unamplified.

So, think on it! This AMERICAN is advocating:
Arabic numerals.
Roman letters.
An emperor's thumb.

Not very bright.

Those who do not remember the paste are condemned to repeat it.
-George Santayana

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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On Sun, 04 Mar 2018 04:32:36 -0600, wrote:

On Sat, 03 Mar 2018 13:32:56 -0600, Chuck wrote:

May God damn those who use Metrics.

God Bless America.

Thank God I'm a country boy!!!

I hope this is satirical.

---


"Okie From Muskogee" (Anti-metric edition)

We don't smoke marijuana in Muskogee;
We don't take no trips on LSD
We don't burn no draft cards down on Main Street;
We like livin' right, and bein' free.

I'm proud to be an Okie from Muskogee,
A place where even squares can have a ball
We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
And white lightnin's still the biggest thrill of all

We don't make a party out of lovin';
We like holdin' hands and pitchin' woo;
We don't let our hair grow long and shaggy,
Like the hippies out in San Francisco do.

And I'm proud to be an Okie from Muskogee,
A place where even squares can have a ball.
We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
And white lightnin's still the biggest thrill of all.

Leather boots are still in style for manly footwear;
Beads and Roman sandals won't be seen.
Football's still the roughest thing on campus,
And the kids here still respect the college dean.

******
We dont use no commie metrics in Muskogee,
Our tape measures only read inches and feet.
Our prom queen is a perfect 38-24-36 inches,
We still spin 45rpm records to feel the beat.
*******

We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
In Muskogee, Oklahoma, USA.

It is interesting that you mentioned "Okie From Muskogee".
I have been stuck in this backward state for 29 years because my
former wife took a job here. Now I'm divorced and moving back north
in 3 weeks. The state should have a new motto such as " land of" 4
day school weeks or pederast bible thumper politicians or deep well
injection induced earthquakes. It will be nice living in a state that
has the best health care and is no. 1 in quality of life. By the
way, Merle was hip and wrote this song as satire. You might want to
check out Merle's favorite singer Iris DeMent if you still don't get
it.

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Those who do not remember the paste are condemned to repeat it.
-George Santayana


I remember the paste. The dumbest kids in class used to eat it.
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On Sunday, 4 March 2018 18:29:23 UTC, wrote:

Oh, I dunno - anyone smitten with a system based on the width of the (Roman) emperor's thumb some several thousand years ago deserves pity.

All and at the same time, the last time I saw Merle in concert (as an opener for Leo Kottke of all things!) he was a tired old man with neither vinegar nor **** remaining, and not much of his voice. It was a small room, and entirely unamplified.

So, think on it! This AMERICAN is advocating:
Arabic numerals.
Roman letters.
An emperor's thumb.

Not very bright.

Those who do not remember the paste are condemned to repeat it.
-George Santayana

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


Measurement units are all arbitrary. One upside of imperial is the units are divisible by several whole numbers, making mental mathematics easier some of the time. To call them 'not very bright' is just not very bright.

The modern world contains no end of both unit systems in use, thus the sensible practical person familiarises themselves with both systems. (Which explains why our UK schools only teach one system.)


NT


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On 3/4/18 2:31 PM, Gareth Magennis wrote:
Just from memory, I can't be arsed to Google it right now,

isn't there some piece of metal held in a vault somewhere (possibly
France) that is defined to be the accepted length of a metre?


That would be the Bureau international des poids et mesures.

The original international prototype of the metre is still kept at
the BIPM under the conditions specified in 1889.

The BIPM is also the keeper of the international prototype of the
kilogram.

The BIPM is situated in the Parc de Saint-Cloud, at Sèvres, in the
suburbs south-west of Paris.

Postal address: Pavillon de Breteuil, F-92312 Sèvres Cedex
Street address: 12bis Grande Rue, F-92310 Sèvres

However, it's still just an arbitrary measurement. It was based on
a fraction of the earth's diameter. And derived from a small arc of
said diameter. Coincidentally it just happened to end up being close
to the same length of the English yard.

Frequency is another arbitrary system. It is based on the rotation
of the earth divided by 86,400 for seconds. Or 24 for hours, which
had already been standardized during the Roman Empire.

The primary advantage of the Metric system is all the units are
related to one another and divisible by ten. Length, volume, weight
etc.. Unlike the relationship between inches, ounces (liquid) and
ounces (weight) that all have different divisors. Inch, feet, yards,
miles etc..





--
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Jeff-1.0
WA6FWi
http:foxsmercantile.com
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On Sunday, 4 March 2018 21:41:33 UTC, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 3/4/18 2:31 PM, Gareth Magennis wrote:
Just from memory, I can't be arsed to Google it right now,

isn't there some piece of metal held in a vault somewhere (possibly
France) that is defined to be the accepted length of a metre?


That would be the Bureau international des poids et mesures.

The original international prototype of the metre is still kept at
the BIPM under the conditions specified in 1889.

The BIPM is also the keeper of the international prototype of the
kilogram.

The BIPM is situated in the Parc de Saint-Cloud, at Sèvres, in the
suburbs south-west of Paris.

Postal address: Pavillon de Breteuil, F-92312 Sèvres Cedex
Street address: 12bis Grande Rue, F-92310 Sèvres

However, it's still just an arbitrary measurement. It was based on
a fraction of the earth's diameter. And derived from a small arc of
said diameter. Coincidentally it just happened to end up being close
to the same length of the English yard.

Frequency is another arbitrary system. It is based on the rotation
of the earth divided by 86,400 for seconds. Or 24 for hours, which
had already been standardized during the Roman Empire.

The primary advantage of the Metric system is all the units are
related to one another and divisible by ten. Length, volume, weight
etc.. Unlike the relationship between inches, ounces (liquid) and
ounces (weight) that all have different divisors. Inch, feet, yards,
miles etc..


Somewhere I have a book from the 1800s that lists the sizes of imperial measurements in various countries. They are nearly all different, that is the prime reason metric became popular, traditional units became a mare when international trade greatly expanded.

Easy division by 10 is sometimes useful. Easy division by 2,3,4,6 & 12 is sometimes useful. I pick my system according to which works better for each task.


NT
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On Sunday, 4 March 2018 22:16:09 UTC, Gareth Magennis wrote:

OK, I'm no Physisyst, though I quite liked Physics at school and was
reasonably good at it.

Is it not now considered that time is no longer arbitrary?
i.e. Atomic clocks base a second around the determinable decay of some kind
of (cesium) radioactive particle?

This is not a variable under normal earth conditions.


but the unit of seconds is an arbitrary number of decays.


NT
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On 3/4/18 4:16 PM, Gareth Magennis wrote:
Is it not now considered that time is no longer arbitrary?
i.e. Atomic clocks base a second around the determinable
decay of some kind of (cesium) radioactive particle?


It's still an arbitrary measurement.
Just now, it is one they can assign it's arbitrary value more
accurately and consistently.

Just like the gram.

Originally defined as "the absolute weight of a volume of pure
water equal to the cube of the hundredth part of a metre, and
at the temperature of melting ice"[2] (later at 4 °C, the
temperature of maximum density of water). However, in a reversal
of reference and defined units, a gram is now defined as one
one-thousandth of the SI base unit, the kilogram, or 1×103 kg,
which itself is now defined, not in terms of grams, but as being
equal to the mass of a physical prototype of a specific alloy kept
locked up and preserved by the International Bureau of Weights and
Measures.

Or Fahrenheit vs Celsius.
Fahrenheit was originally derived a 0 F = the coldest it's ever
been and 100 F = the hottest it's ever been. Both quite arbitrary.
Then along came Celsius. Water freezes at 0 C and boils at 100 C,
compared to 32 F and 212 F respectively. A little bit more accurate
that "Oh **** it's hot outside."



--
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
WA6FWi
http:foxsmercantile.com
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On 3/4/18 6:26 PM, Gareth Magennis wrote:

I don't need to argue semantics with you.


Correct, because arbitrary and variable have two very different
meanings.

Arbitrary, Based on random choice or personal whim, rather than
any reason or system.

All units are inherently arbitrary.
The variable nature of them is only in the matter with which
they have been redefined for greater accuracy and repeatably.

It's not like a meter has suddenly changed from 39.370079" to
40". Or has varied from 30" to 40" over the years.




--
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
WA6FWi
http:foxsmercantile.com


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Fox's Mercantile wrote:
___________________________


All units are inherently arbitrary.
The variable nature of them is only in the matter with which
they have been redefined for greater accuracy and repeatably.

It's not like a meter has suddenly changed from 39.370079" to
40". Or has varied from 30" to 40" over the years.


** Long time ago, it was decided to *define* the inch in tern of the cm.

1 inch = 2.54cm *exactly*.

so 1 foot = 30.48cm *exactly".

but 1 litre = 61 cu. inches is approximate, cos it goes the other way.




...... Phil
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On Sun, 4 Mar 2018 22:16:04 -0000, "Gareth Magennis"
wrote:

OK, I'm no Physisyst, though I quite liked Physics at school and was
reasonably good at it.


Methinks you mean Fizix.

Is it not now considered that time is no longer arbitrary?
i.e. Atomic clocks base a second around the determinable decay of some kind
of (cesium) radioactive particle?
This is not a variable under normal earth conditions.


Nope. Those are "natural units" or units based on the properties of
things found in nature and are therefore not arbitrary. They are used
mostly in Fizix and by quantum mechanics:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_units

The remaining units are arbitrary and based on some base unit that is
usually measurable, until the search for finer resolution brings the
standard bearers into the quagmire of quantum fizix, where their
standards run into problems with Heisenberg's uncertainty principle:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heisenberg%27s_uncertainty_principle
where one can only measure what one cannot find, and the observer
effect:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer_effect_(physics)
where things move away if you try to measure them. As you might
suspect, measurement standards based on sub-atomic particles, is a
really bad idea.

Such difficulties have not stopped people from inventing their own
units of measures, usually for some devious purpose:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_unusual_units_of_measurement
Unfortunately, it doesn't list the unit of measure that I invented and
probably should copyright. Helen of Troy allegedly launched 1000
ships and was known to be the ultimate feminine beauty of her day.
Therefore, I defined the measure of contemporary feminine beauty as
the milliHelen, which would launch one ship. Of course, negative
milliHelens are the measure of feminine ugliness capable of sinking
one ship. So far, the beauty, fashion and entertainment industries
have not expressed any interest in adopting my measurement system.

Another useful unit of measure that I invented is the Subaru Day(tm).
The digital clock in my 2001 Subaru Forester runs about 10 seconds
slow every day, making the length of the average day equal to 24 hrs,
0 mins, and 10 seconds. Rather than repair and calibrate my clock, I
have invented a new unit of measure, which defines the length of my
day to be 10 seconds longer than the traditional 24 hr day. In
keeping with astronomical traditions, the Subaru Day will be
synchronized with the solar day several times per year, usually on the
day I do an oil and filter change.

I hope this helps...

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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On 3/4/18 7:06 PM, Gareth Magennis wrote:

I'm not interested.


Bye.


Of course not. The willfully ignorant never are.

--
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
WA6FWi
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On Sun, 4 Mar 2018 10:29:16 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

Those who do not remember the paste are condemned to repeat it.
-George Santayana

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


Psssst. I think you mean "past".

I don't like that expression. When I contrive something new, the
first thing I do is research its past history and repeat all the old
experiments. That's to be sure that they were done properly and that
someone didn't just make a mistake in reporting a failure. I then
proceed to invent my own mistakes, repeating them as needed, until I
hopefully reach a satisfactory result. It's called perseverance where
the acceptance of past failures is counter productive. A good example
is the repetition of the Michelson-Morley experiment:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelson%E2%80%93Morley_experiment
where a substantial number of experimenters continue to improve the
measurement precision in the hope of demonstrating that the speed of
light just might be even slightly affected by the earth's motion.

Premature Judgement:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/crud/Premature-Judgement.txt

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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On Sun, 4 Mar 2018 22:16:04 -0000, "Gareth Magennis"
wrote:

However, it's still just an arbitrary measurement. It was based on
a fraction of the earth's diameter. And derived from a small arc of
said diameter. Coincidentally it just happened to end up being close
to the same length of the English yard.

Frequency is another arbitrary system. It is based on the rotation
of the earth divided by 86,400 for seconds. Or 24 for hours, which
had already been standardized during the Roman Empire.

The primary advantage of the Metric system is all the units are
related to one another and divisible by ten. Length, volume, weight
etc.. Unlike the relationship between inches, ounces (liquid) and
ounces (weight) that all have different divisors. Inch, feet, yards,
miles etc..


None of this bull**** will do any good in nature. I am in the middle of
the woods and dont have any tools. I want to measure the distance
between two huge bolders. All I have to do is take off my shoes, begin
by the first bolder and put one foot in front of my other foot until I
get to the second bolder. After 32 foot steps, I arrive at bolder #2. I
now know that the distance between those bolders is 32 FEET.
How much more natural is that? The human body has a built in measuring
device. You dont need no goddamn slide rules and computers to determine
the earth's rotation or any of that nonsense. Just use the FEET that you
got when you were born.

And never forget, the height of the horse that took you out into those
woods is 15 hands tall. Measure from the ground, to the top of his
withers, stacking you hands one on top of the other. You're horse is 15
hands tall. (The withers is the base of the neck where the mane ends, if
you did not know that).

Even today, people measure their horses with hands. Using a tape measure
is horse owner correct, and make you look like a fool. Real cowboys and
cowgirls use HANDS.

However, if you want to cheat, and measure 60 inches with your tape
measure, you have a 15 hand horse. (5 foot tall). One hand is considered
to be 4 inches.

By the way, if your horse is only 10 hands tall, you better not be over
10 years old, because you are too heavy for that Shetland Pony.


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