Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Our office will be purchasing an AED shortly. We are a multiple medical practice covering four states, and so have a long-term relationship with McKesson. Meaning I can get all the advice I want from their sales department, and that we have access to all brands.

Question: Has anyone *HERE* ever had the need to use such a device, service such a device or have any experience-based suggestions? A little bit of real-world experience might be useful.

Thanks in advance!


Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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On Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 10:33:09 AM UTC-5, wrote:
Our office will be purchasing an AED shortly. We are a multiple medical practice covering four states, and so have a long-term relationship with McKesson. Meaning I can get all the advice I want from their sales department, and that we have access to all brands.

Question: Has anyone *HERE* ever had the need to use such a device, service such a device or have any experience-based suggestions? A little bit of real-world experience might be useful.

Thanks in advance!


Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


AEDs by their nature are designed to be easy to use. As an EMT, I have used these many times. Just to let you know... In real life, these RARELY shock anyone. Unlike TV, AEDs DO NOT shock a flatline (asystole). An AED will only shock someone if Ventricular Fibrulation (V-fib).

As far as brands go, I have used LIFEPACK and Philips either of which are good manufacturers and will work as designed.

The Philips has a key to use for pediatric patients where many others use different pad sets. The choice is up to you. Pick one that seems the easiest to use for you. All AEDs that I have seen over the years actually walk you through the process and provide clear diagrams for pad placement.

If you ever need to use one, listen to the prompts and follow them to the letter. Before you push the "deliver" or "shock" button (label will be different for each machine), be sure that NO-ONE is touching the patient. If they are they WILL get shocked and will likely become another patient.

Dan

Side note: Just so that people understand, contrary to popular belief, an AED does NOT "start" the heart. In reality it stops the heart for a second. Think of this as trying to get the attention of an out of control teenager... sometimes a good smack on the back of the head is required to get their attention. This is essentially what the AED does. It shocks the heart which stops for a beat before resetting and (hopefully) working normally.

I hope this helps.

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On Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 10:44:05 AM UTC-5, wrote:


I hope this helps.


It does. very much! Thank you for sharing your experience!

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

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On Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 12:23:05 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 10:44:05 AM UTC-5, wrote:


I hope this helps.


It does. very much! Thank you for sharing your experience!

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


I probably should add:


The presence of an AED does not preclude good CPR being done. Everyone should know CPR. At the very least, chest compressions are beneficial even without any attempt to assist breathing. Only stop CPR at 2 times:

1) When the AED is analyzing the heart rate/rhythm

2) During the shock (when told to shock)

Keep CPR going until assistance arrives. Be ready to hand it off to another person as it very tiring. You should not try to perform CPR for more than 5-10 minutes without relief as your ability to deliver quality compressions will fail after that time.

Dan (and yes, I have done CPR on real people many times both with ultimate success and without sadly)
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On Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 1:07:36 PM UTC-5, wrote:


I probably should add:


The presence of an AED does not preclude good CPR being done. Everyone should know CPR. At the very least, chest compressions are beneficial even without any attempt to assist breathing. Only stop CPR at 2 times:

1) When the AED is analyzing the heart rate/rhythm

2) During the shock (when told to shock)

Keep CPR going until assistance arrives. Be ready to hand it off to another person as it very tiring. You should not try to perform CPR for more than 5-10 minutes without relief as your ability to deliver quality compressions will fail after that time.

Dan (and yes, I have done CPR on real people many times both with ultimate success and without sadly)


My intention is to purchase a package through the Red Cross that includes CPR training, AED training and the unit itself. As always, thank you for giving me good information and means to avoid wasted motion.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


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On Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 3:17:01 PM UTC-5, Dave Platt wrote:
In article ,
wrote:

My intention is to purchase a package through the Red Cross that includes CPR training, AED training and the unit itself.


A good combination - get yourself and your people trained on the
actual model you'll be buying, if at all possible.

One issue our instructor pointed out: some AED models will
automatically activate when you open them. You don't necessarily want
that, if it happens prematurely - it might delay your ability to
(re)start the diagnostic cycle when you actually get the pads onto the
patient.

Our instructor recommended that when we send somebody to the AED
cabinet, we say "Get the AED. Don't open it, don't try to turn it on.
Just bring it back here immediately."

May not be relevant to all AED models, of course.


That is news to me. Since there is no way for the machine to know when/if the pads are in place, they usually prompt the user to hit the analyze button. Unless CPR is halted during this analysis period, the machine will not react properly. The machine "looks" at the trace you usually see on TV in hospital scenes. On a standard EKG machine, this is known as lead 2. This lead is used to see the rate and rhythm of the heart beat. With a typical EKG monitor, there are 5 wires connected to the body which provide this trace as well as others. If further detailed analysis is needed, additional leads are attached (5 more totaling 10) which provide what is called a 12-lead tracing. This allows for a varied view of the electrical activity of the heart that can be read to determine whether or not there are problems (such as a heart attack).

The bottom line here is that ALL AEDs work the same way and have slight variations. Follow the audio prompts. Get familiar with the ones that are local to you if you can. But, rest assured, they will be similar enough that any of them can be used with confidence.

Dan
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Our AEDs notify the fire department when you open the cabinet to take it out or even look at it.

I've never seen ours used but we put them in every building on the campus.
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On Friday, January 19, 2018 at 9:05:56 AM UTC-5, Tim R wrote:
Our AEDs notify the fire department when you open the cabinet to take it out or even look at it.

I've never seen ours used but we put them in every building on the campus.


Note: That function is not the AED but the cabinet in which it is installed. Some make a notification, others just blare a siren of some sort.

Dan
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