Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Old January 22nd 17, 07:35 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default wire conductivity

On 1/10/2017 10:09 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

That wire must be some oxygen free, special insulated wire or some such
snake oil coated. There is no way the wire of the same gauge is going
to be noticed when there is probaly over 50 feet of cheep wire from the
socket to the breaker box of the house and hard telling how many miles
of even cheaper made wire to the power company.


For the definitive answer from an electrical engineer, see the answer by
Bill Shymanski
https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=...al/eWXk4BjP-rM

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Old January 22nd 17, 07:40 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default wire conductivity

On 1/7/2017 10:24 PM, isw wrote:
In article ,

The only aluminum wire is used as power lead-ins to houses, as it is much
cheaper than copper. They did use aluminum wire INSIDE houses in the US
around 1966-1968, and it burned a lot of houses down, due to the cold flow
of aluminum weakening the contact force.


ISTR that the problem was mostly that electricians couldn't be bothered
to learn the new techniques and so on that were mandatory to install the
stuff safely. It was only when it was installed just like Cu that it was
prone to overheating.


The problem is only for 15 and 20 amp branch circuits. Larger wire is
used often without problems.

Around 1965 the price of copper went through the roof and aluminum
started to be used on 15 and 20A circuits. Failed connections and fires
resulted, and in 1971 UL pulled the listing on that aluminum wire and
the aluminum rating for devices like switches and receptacles. New
standards soon followed. The new aluminum wire was harder, and devices
had a CO/ALR (Revised) rating.

The CPSC had extensive testing done on aluminum connections. That
testing found that the aluminum oxide surface insulating layer caused
much of the problem - the actual metal-metal contact could be quite
small. Installations done "properly" could still fail. The probability
of a failure was just higher for aluminum than copper. Even though
there is a new alloy, most of the wire actually installed is the "old
technology" stuff. "Backstab" device connections were never listed for
use with aluminum.

If someone is working with this 15 & 20A wire there is a good paper on
connections at:
http://www.kinginnovation.com/pdfs/R...Fire070706.pdf
It is written by the engineer that supervised the testing for the CPSC.
Use of antioxide pastes is generally recommended.

The best connectors are
http://www.kinginnovation.com/produc...cts/alumiconn/
They have a screw connection that likely breaks through surface oxides.
(Connections for large wires also deform the wire.)


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Old February 4th 17, 07:10 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default wire conductivity

AND THE WIRE IS...

Consolidated

14(41)UL 1007/1569 105C CSA TR64 30C FT1 BLUE


for example, other spools state differently but same batch MO
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Old February 5th 17, 09:34 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default wire conductivity

On Tuesday, January 10, 2017 at 11:38:54 AM UTC-8, Jon Elson wrote:
isw wrote:


[about aluminum house wiring]

ISTR that the problem was mostly that electricians couldn't be bothered
to learn the new techniques and so on that were mandatory to install the
stuff safely.


If the wrong wire terminal combination is installed, then your house WILL
burn down, guaranteed! If you use the right CO/ALR fittings EVERYWHERE,
then over time you will STILL develop poor connections.


Covering the aluminum leads with anti-corrosive material (noalox) before attaching to copper or brass terminals helps.
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Old February 6th 17, 11:54 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default wire conductivity

In article ,
says...

AND THE WIRE IS...

Consolidated

14(41)UL 1007/1569 105C CSA TR64 30C FT1 BLUE


for example, other spools state differently but same batch MO


PLL lock just out of reach ?

jamie



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