Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Matti Kaki
 
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Default Transistor CS1092G in Sutton 8 transistor AM-radio ?

Hello!

I'm fixing old Hong-Kong made 8 transistor SUTTON AM-radio.
I found this transistor as defective. Does anyone know what
is this transistor? I can't find anything using Google.
There is manufacturers logo which is 'F' and following type

CS1092G 177

This radio was made in 1964 so I believe this is a germanium one.
I made a scan of the transistor which you can see he

http://www.sci.fi/~oh2bio/japsitrankku.jpg

Thank you very much!

Matti Kaki OH2BIO Finland

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Watson A.Name - Watt Sun
 
Posts: n/a
Default Transistor CS1092G in Sutton 8 transistor AM-radio ?

In article ,
lid mentioned...
Hello!

I'm fixing old Hong-Kong made 8 transistor SUTTON AM-radio.
I found this transistor as defective. Does anyone know what
is this transistor? I can't find anything using Google.
There is manufacturers logo which is 'F' and following type

CS1092G 177

This radio was made in 1964 so I believe this is a germanium one.


It is not a germanium, it is a silicon. Germanium transistors must be
in metal cans. The transistor is in a TO-106 case and made by
Fairchild. Depending on where it is in the circuit, it could be a
mixer/converter, an IF, or an audio amp. In the '60s, many of these
transistors were used in AM and AM/FM radios. They're inexpensive
jellybean parts and are usually in the 2N5232 series numbering range.
The IF transistors used some kind of AGC, which may make it necessary
to choose a transistor with that characteristic. But othewise, just
about any silicon transistor can be used. If you change a transistor
in a tuned ircuit, you may have to retune it.

I made a scan of the transistor which you can see he


http://www.sci.fi/~oh2bio/japsitrankku.jpg

Thank you very much!

Matti Kaki OH2BIO Finland



--
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###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/e...s/databank.htm
My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 at hotmail.com
Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
@@t@h@e@@a@f@f@l@u@e@n@t@@m@e@e@t@@t@h@e@@E@f@f@l@ u@e@n@t@@
  #3   Report Post  
Matti Kaki
 
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Default Transistor CS1092G in Sutton 8 transistor AM-radio ?

In article ,
says...


In article ,
mentioned...
Hello!

I'm fixing old Hong-Kong made 8 transistor SUTTON AM-radio.
I found this transistor as defective. Does anyone know what
is this transistor? I can't find anything using Google.
There is manufacturers logo which is 'F' and following type

CS1092G 177

This radio was made in 1964 so I believe this is a germanium one.


It is not a germanium, it is a silicon. Germanium transistors must be
in metal cans.


Not all the germanium transtors were in metal cases.
I remember well when I used OC71 -germanium transistor
as light detector scraping the black paint off so that
light influenced directy to the transistor itself. :-)
But your point is a good one. It can be possible.
The radio is quite old and these usually were all
germanium -transitorized.

The transistor is in a TO-106 case and made by
Fairchild. Depending on where it is in the circuit, it could be a
mixer/converter, an IF, or an audio amp. In the '60s, many of these
transistors were used in AM and AM/FM radios. They're inexpensive
jellybean parts and are usually in the 2N5232 series numbering range.
The IF transistors used some kind of AGC, which may make it necessary
to choose a transistor with that characteristic. But othewise, just
about any silicon transistor can be used. If you change a transistor
in a tuned ircuit, you may have to retune it.


Thank you for explanation. It is the first HF-transistor
and is directly connected to the ferrite antenna/coil.
I'll try something. Probably any modern HF-transistor
will work fine. I'll let know if it worked.

Matti Kaki OH2BIO

  #4   Report Post  
Tweetldee
 
Posts: n/a
Default Transistor CS1092G in Sutton 8 transistor AM-radio ?

In article ,
mentioned...
Hello!

I'm fixing old Hong-Kong made 8 transistor SUTTON AM-radio.
I found this transistor as defective. Does anyone know what
is this transistor? I can't find anything using Google.
There is manufacturers logo which is 'F' and following type

CS1092G 177

This radio was made in 1964 so I believe this is a germanium one.


It is not a germanium, it is a silicon. Germanium transistors must be
in metal cans.



There is no requirement for germanium transistors to be in a metal case.
One of the earliest commercially available transistors, the Raytheon CK722,
was a germanium unit, and it was available in a black epoxy case. I used to
have a handful of them in my junquebox.

--
Tweetldee
Tweetldee at att dot net (Just subsitute the appropriate characters in the
address)

Never take a laxative and a sleeping pill at the same time!!


  #5   Report Post  
Watson A.Name - Watt Sun
 
Posts: n/a
Default Transistor CS1092G in Sutton 8 transistor AM-radio ?

In article ,
lid mentioned...
In article ,
says...


In article ,
mentioned...
Hello!

I'm fixing old Hong-Kong made 8 transistor SUTTON AM-radio.
I found this transistor as defective. Does anyone know what
is this transistor? I can't find anything using Google.
There is manufacturers logo which is 'F' and following type

CS1092G 177

This radio was made in 1964 so I believe this is a germanium one.


It is not a germanium, it is a silicon. Germanium transistors must be
in metal cans.


Not all the germanium transtors were in metal cases.


Germanium cannot be passivated with metal oxide like silicon can.
Therefore a germanium transistor would become contaminated soon after
being put into an epoxy package.

I remember well when I used OC71 -germanium transistor
as light detector scraping the black paint off so that
light influenced directy to the transistor itself. :-)


Glass case is like metal, it's not contaminating, but it's more
fragile than metal or epoxy. So it's seldom found in transistor
packages in the U.S.

But your point is a good one. It can be possible.
The radio is quite old and these usually were all
germanium -transitorized.


Some radios made in the '60s used both germanium and silicon
transistors. The silicons showed best performance in the RF and IF
sections, and the germaniums were used in the audio amp and output.

The transistor is in a TO-106 case and made by
Fairchild. Depending on where it is in the circuit, it could be a
mixer/converter, an IF, or an audio amp. In the '60s, many of these
transistors were used in AM and AM/FM radios. They're inexpensive
jellybean parts and are usually in the 2N5232 series numbering range.
The IF transistors used some kind of AGC, which may make it necessary
to choose a transistor with that characteristic. But othewise, just
about any silicon transistor can be used. If you change a transistor
in a tuned ircuit, you may have to retune it.


Thank you for explanation. It is the first HF-transistor
and is directly connected to the ferrite antenna/coil.
I'll try something. Probably any modern HF-transistor
will work fine. I'll let know if it worked.


This transistor is usually the oscillator and converter. I erred when
I said 2N5232 above; I should have said 2N5132.

Matti Kaki OH2BIO



--
@@F@r@o@m@@O@r@a@n@g@e@@C@o@u@n@t@y@,@@C@a@l@,@@w@ h@e@r@e@@
###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/e...s/databank.htm
My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 at hotmail.com
Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
@@t@h@e@@a@f@f@l@u@e@n@t@@m@e@e@t@@t@h@e@@E@f@f@l@ u@e@n@t@@


  #6   Report Post  
Watson A.Name - Watt Sun
 
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Default Transistor CS1092G in Sutton 8 transistor AM-radio ?

In article N7mlb.10095$Ec1.915173@bgtnsc05-
news.ops.worldnet.att.net, mentioned...
In article ,
mentioned...
Hello!

I'm fixing old Hong-Kong made 8 transistor SUTTON AM-radio.
I found this transistor as defective. Does anyone know what
is this transistor? I can't find anything using Google.
There is manufacturers logo which is 'F' and following type

CS1092G 177

This radio was made in 1964 so I believe this is a germanium one.

It is not a germanium, it is a silicon. Germanium transistors must be
in metal cans.



There is no requirement for germanium transistors to be in a metal case.


The germanium transistor can't be passivated like a silicon can with
metal oxide. So if it is put into a non-hermetically sealed case, it
will soon be contaminated by the case material.

One of the earliest commercially available transistors, the Raytheon CK722,
was a germanium unit, and it was available in a black epoxy case. I used to
have a handful of them in my junquebox.


The later versions of the CK722 were in an aluminum (metal) case,
which was hermetically sealed to prevent contamination. Probably
because they learned that the epoxy ones got contaminaed after a few
years.

Almost all germaniums made commercially in the U.S. were in a
hermetically sealed metal case.

--
@@F@r@o@m@@O@r@a@n@g@e@@C@o@u@n@t@y@,@@C@a@l@,@@w@ h@e@r@e@@
###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/e...s/databank.htm
My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 at hotmail.com
Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
@@t@h@e@@a@f@f@l@u@e@n@t@@m@e@e@t@@t@h@e@@E@f@f@l@ u@e@n@t@@
  #8   Report Post  
Watson A.Name - Watt Sun
 
Posts: n/a
Default Transistor CS1092G in Sutton 8 transistor AM-radio ?

In article ,
lid mentioned...
In article ,
says...

Germanium cannot be passivated with metal oxide like silicon can.
Therefore a germanium transistor would become contaminated soon after
being put into an epoxy package.

I remember well when I used OC71 -germanium transistor
as light detector scraping the black paint off so that
light influenced directy to the transistor itself. :-)


Glass case is like metal, it's not contaminating, but it's more
fragile than metal or epoxy. So it's seldom found in transistor
packages in the U.S.

But your point is a good one. It can be possible.
The radio is quite old and these usually were all
germanium -transitorized.


Some radios made in the '60s used both germanium and silicon
transistors. The silicons showed best performance in the RF and IF
sections, and the germaniums were used in the audio amp and output.


I'll buy this. Thanks for your explanation.
And yes, I remember that allmost all the germanium
transistor were in metal case. This is a good
guide to go by.


The early '60s were a transition time for the engineers. The TTL SSI
ICs had come out in the very end of the '50s and early '50s, and were
replacing the discrete logic circuits that were found in the first
solid state digital equipment. So the manufacturers of transistors
were not able to sell as many transistors as before, and the mostly
germanium transistor supply exceeded demands. So prices were cheap,
and germaniums were a commodity item. Silicon transistors were still
relatively new, but were being mass produced in epoxy cases, like the
one you have, and they were still relatively inexpensive.

Matti Kaki OH2BIO



--
@@F@r@o@m@@O@r@a@n@g@e@@C@o@u@n@t@y@,@@C@a@l@,@@w@ h@e@r@e@@
###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/e...s/databank.htm
My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 at hotmail.com
Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
@@t@h@e@@a@f@f@l@u@e@n@t@@m@e@e@t@@t@h@e@@E@f@f@l@ u@e@n@t@@
  #9   Report Post  
Daniel Lang
 
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Default Transistor CS1092G in Sutton 8 transistor AM-radio ?

I'm fixing old Hong-Kong made 8 transistor SUTTON AM-radio.
I found this transistor as defective. Does anyone know what
is this transistor? I can't find anything using Google.
There is manufacturers logo which is 'F' and following type

CS1092G 177

This radio was made in 1964 so I believe this is a germanium one.

It is not a germanium, it is a silicon. Germanium transistors must

be
in metal cans.


I am not familiar with this particular part number but I have seen
many Fairchild transistors in this style package and they were all
silicon (on old computer boards, etc.)

Daniel Lang


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