Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Old May 29th 16, 08:43 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Want to build resistor..

This resistor is very simple. It will have
stereo RCA in and out, and 1/8" mini
in and out.

All it will do is attenuate 2.5khz by 3
dB, with a Q wide enough to modestly
affect frequencies from 1kHz up to 4kHz.

Essentially to mildly scoop out those
audio frequencies humans most readily
hear. One could plug a line source or
phone into it, and RCA out, IE, to a
stereo amp. One could use the built-
in tone controls('Bass', 'Treble'), to
tailor the ends of the bandwidth to
taste.

Result? A smoother, less intrusive
sound at background or concert-
hall levels.

What materials do I need?

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Old May 30th 16, 05:20 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Want to build resistor..

On 2016-05-29, wrote:
This resistor is very simple. It will have
stereo RCA in and out, and 1/8" mini
in and out.

All it will do is attenuate 2.5khz by 3
dB, with a Q wide enough to modestly
affect frequencies from 1kHz up to 4kHz.

Essentially to mildly scoop out those
audio frequencies humans most readily
hear. One could plug a line source or
phone into it, and RCA out, IE, to a
stereo amp. One could use the built-
in tone controls('Bass', 'Treble'), to
tailor the ends of the bandwidth to
taste.

Result? A smoother, less intrusive
sound at background or concert-
hall levels.

What materials do I need?


So not a resistor, but a filter,
a notch or band stop filter to be
precise.
You will at least need resistors and capacitors,
possibly one or two coils.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Band-stop_filter
http://www.radio-electronics.com/info/circuits/rc_notch_filter/twin_t_notch_filter.php
http://www.hobby-circuits.com/circuits/audio/audio-filter/590/rc-notch-filter-twin-t
http://www.instructables.com/id/Passive-Filter-Circuits/

Making it a passive circuit will also
attenuate the signal level, so you
might need some active amplification
in it to recover that.

http://www.circuitsstream.com/2013/06/simple-notch-filter-uses-operational.html
http://www.radio-electronics.com/info/circuits/opamp_notch_filter/opamp_notch_filter.php

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Old May 30th 16, 08:25 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Want to build resistor..

On Monday, May 30, 2016 at 8:30:43 AM UTC-7, M Philbrook wrote:

a Graphic EQ.

Jamie

....which you can find on eBay, many under US$20 (and even cheaper at a ham swap).
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Old May 31st 16, 12:15 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Want to build resistor..

On Sun, 29 May 2016 11:43:05 -0700 (PDT), wrote:


Result? A smoother, less intrusive
sound at background or concert-
hall levels.


Smoother than what?

Twin-T, RC filter.


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Old May 31st 16, 01:23 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Want to build resistor..

Black Iccy wrote: "Smoother than what?"


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...indos1.svg.png

Read up on it.
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Old May 31st 16, 02:27 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Want to build resistor..



wrote in message
...

This resistor is very simple. It will have
stereo RCA in and out, and 1/8" mini
in and out.

All it will do is attenuate 2.5khz by 3
dB, with a Q wide enough to modestly
affect frequencies from 1kHz up to 4kHz.

Essentially to mildly scoop out those
audio frequencies humans most readily
hear. One could plug a line source or
phone into it, and RCA out, IE, to a
stereo amp. One could use the built-
in tone controls('Bass', 'Treble'), to
tailor the ends of the bandwidth to
taste.

Result? A smoother, less intrusive
sound at background or concert-
hall levels.

What materials do I need?






You want a parametric EQ you can build yourself.

Good luck with that.


Gareth.

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Old May 31st 16, 09:00 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Want to build resistor..

On Mon, 30 May 2016 16:23:22 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

Black Iccy wrote: "Smoother than what?"


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...indos1.svg.png

Read up on it.


No use pointing me at a set of Fletcher-Munson curves.
I met those more than 60 years ago so if you think they're
a point of enlightenment for me. Wrong. Particularly wrong
because those curves are statistical averages for particular
known levels. If you're trying to produce a response contour,
those curves are not *it*. Turn up the volume a bit and your
ears will respond differently.

If you're trying to attenuate the mid-range audible levels
for yourself, then you're intensifying the effect. Possibly wrong.

If you think that a source has not had sufficient attention
by the recording engineer at the time and that he/she did
not endeavour to ensure a good result (one which you don't like)
so you alter the response that's for you to decide. The easiest
way is to build *nothing* and just raise the trevble and bass
controls a fraction - same result.


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Old May 31st 16, 01:45 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Want to build resistor..

On Tuesday, May 31, 2016 at 3:00:18 AM UTC-4, Black Iccy wrote:
On Mon, 30 May 2016 16:23:22 -0700 (PDT)
Black Iccy wrote: "Smoother than what?"


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...indos1.svg.png

Read up on it.


No use pointing me at a set of Fletcher-Munson curves.
I met those more than 60 years ago so if you think they're
a point of enlightenment for me. Wrong. Particularly wrong
because those curves are statistical averages for particular
known levels. If you're trying to produce a response contour,
those curves are not *it*. Turn up the volume a bit and your
ears will respond differently.

If you're trying to attenuate the mid-range audible levels
for yourself, then you're intensifying the effect. Possibly wrong.

If you think that a source has not had sufficient attention
by the recording engineer at the time and that he/she did
not endeavour to ensure a good result (one which you don't like)
so you alter the response that's for you to decide. The easiest
way is to build *nothing* and just raise the trevble and bass
controls a fraction - same result.

________________

The point is, doing so sounds good to
me. There are two audible "muddy zones"
in the audio spectrum, to either side
of 1kHZ: between 150-250Hz, and between
2-4kHz. A low-Q modest scoop(2-3dB) in
those areas cleans things right up,
whether I'm listening through full-size
speakers, headphones, even if I'm
listening through those dreaded Apple
Buds that ship with every iPod.


All I need is a filter for at least the
higher "mud"(2-4khz) that can fit inline
between my iPod and the receiver or
amp it's connected to, or inline between
the CD player and same amp. I have a
15band graphic EQ in my listening system,
but need something a *little* less clunky
for mobile purposes. A filter, if one can
be built that's a little bigger than a
Zippo lighter, would do the trick.


By modestly reducing those areas, I don't
need to "raise the treble and bass". Plus
I've already bought some gain by said
reduction. And even though I looked at
the graph, the area of upper mid-range
I need to reduce that sounds good to
me is slightly lower, between 1-3kHz.
As you said, the published curves represent
averages, so they may not work for
everyone.
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