Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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RB
 
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Default what product to use?

I have a 9/16" threaded shaft which screws into a socket. The threaded
shaft seems to be plated with chrome or nickel. The socket seems to be a
stainless or aluminum alloy of some sort. The threaded shaft has "set" in
the socket, and doesn't want to unscrew. As of yet, I don't want to force
it, as I think something would get damaged.

What is the best product to spray onto the joint area and let sit repeatedly
to help loosen the "set" that's been taken?


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Greg
 
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"RB" wrote in message
.. .
I have a 9/16" threaded shaft which screws into a socket. The threaded
shaft seems to be plated with chrome or nickel. The socket seems to be a
stainless or aluminum alloy of some sort. The threaded shaft has "set" in
the socket, and doesn't want to unscrew. As of yet, I don't want to force
it, as I think something would get damaged.

What is the best product to spray onto the joint area and let sit
repeatedly to help loosen the "set" that's been taken?

Does the joint look corroded? or is there evidence of a locking compound
like Loctite or similar.

Greg.


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Rheilly Phoull
 
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"RB" wrote in message
.. .
I have a 9/16" threaded shaft which screws into a socket. The threaded
shaft seems to be plated with chrome or nickel. The socket seems to be a
stainless or aluminum alloy of some sort. The threaded shaft has "set" in
the socket, and doesn't want to unscrew. As of yet, I don't want to force
it, as I think something would get damaged.

What is the best product to spray onto the joint area and let sit
repeatedly to help loosen the "set" that's been taken?

Not knowing where the socket is may well mean you cant do this but if it's
possible I would heat the socket and put some torque on the shaft at the
same time.

--
Regards ......... Rheilly Phoull


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Art
 
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Default what product to use?

A bit of heat with lubricant added afterwards may assist loosening the item.
"Greg" wrote in message
...
"RB" wrote in message
.. .
I have a 9/16" threaded shaft which screws into a socket. The threaded
shaft seems to be plated with chrome or nickel. The socket seems to be a
stainless or aluminum alloy of some sort. The threaded shaft has "set" in
the socket, and doesn't want to unscrew. As of yet, I don't want to force
it, as I think something would get damaged.

What is the best product to spray onto the joint area and let sit
repeatedly to help loosen the "set" that's been taken?

Does the joint look corroded? or is there evidence of a locking compound
like Loctite or similar.

Greg.



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RB
 
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Default what product to use?

No indication of corrosion or locktite.

Unfortunately, the socket is in a plastic housing, so heat would be
detrimental and/or damaging to the unit.

Thanks for the thoughts. I'm going to have to chemically loosen it and then
screw the shaft out.




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Tim Schwartz
 
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Default what product to use?

RB wrote:
I have a 9/16" threaded shaft which screws into a socket. The threaded
shaft seems to be plated with chrome or nickel. The socket seems to be a
stainless or aluminum alloy of some sort. The threaded shaft has "set" in
the socket, and doesn't want to unscrew. As of yet, I don't want to force
it, as I think something would get damaged.

What is the best product to spray onto the joint area and let sit repeatedly
to help loosen the "set" that's been taken?



Hello,

When working on vintage cars, I've had good luck with a product called
'PB Rust Catalyst - Fabulous Blaster' which can be found at hardware
stores and auto parts stores. I have found it much more effective than
WD-40 (which really isn't intended for this anyway) or Liquid Wrench.

However, BE CAREFUL with the plastic. While I'm sure that any of the
products I've mentioned won't damage nylon bushings, they may contain
solvents that might damage the unspecified plastic used in the housing,
especially if gentle warming with a hair dryer will damage it.

Regards,
Tim Schwartz
Bristol Electronics
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Ron(UK)
 
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RB wrote:
I have a 9/16" threaded shaft which screws into a socket. The threaded
shaft seems to be plated with chrome or nickel. The socket seems to be a
stainless or aluminum alloy of some sort. The threaded shaft has "set" in
the socket, and doesn't want to unscrew. As of yet, I don't want to force
it, as I think something would get damaged.

What is the best product to spray onto the joint area and let sit repeatedly
to help loosen the "set" that's been taken?


Spray the shaft with freezer spray, trying to keep it away from the socket.

Ron(UK)
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