Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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BoborAnn
 
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Default Help INfo on W-353 BAttery

While servicing a Simpson 1699 precision millivolt meter I found an Eveready
W-353 BAttery.Its a 1.5 volt Battery that's about 1 1/4 X 2 1/4X 4 inches
I 've searched the web and cannot find any mention of it which has me
curious as to why such a devise would be used versus a standard D cell in
this unit . The other battery in the device is a standard 9 volt battery.
Would appreciate any info on where to buy this device and any particular
characteristics that would preclude simply using a D Cell
Thanks in Advance
Bob


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NSM
 
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"BoborAnn" wrote in message
...
While servicing a Simpson 1699 precision millivolt meter I found an

Eveready
W-353 BAttery.


Google: "A" (filament) battery, 1.5 volts - Listed as Neda Number 11,
Eveready W353

Its a 1.5 volt Battery that's about 1 1/4 X 2 1/4X 4 inches
I 've searched the web and cannot find any mention of it which has me
curious as to why such a devise would be used versus a standard D cell in
this unit . The other battery in the device is a standard 9 volt battery.
Would appreciate any info on where to buy this device and any particular
characteristics that would preclude simply using a D Cell


Use a D cell if it fits and works. There used to be more radio battery types
and shapes than you can imagine - now there are 4 basic ones. It's a PITA
but that's life.

N




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Dave Plowman (News)
 
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Default

In article AIhxe.73520$wr.20560@clgrps12,
NSM wrote:
Use a D cell if it fits and works. There used to be more radio battery
types and shapes than you can imagine - now there are 4 basic ones. It's
a PITA but that's life.


I sometimes wondered if meter makers in the old days used unusual 1.5 volt
cells to stop them being pinched for other uses. Because most old meters
were large enough to take a standard cell. And although as you say there
were many types, say 50 years ago, the most common were still AA and D, in
the UK, at least.

I have an old but good Taylor analogue meter - still useful where you
really don't want a high impedance device. The 15 volt battery is still
available, but not the 1.5. Which was IIRC, an HP11. Looking through the
cats, as you do, and checking dimensions, I discovered an ancient design
of hand lamp or cycle lamp 4.5v battery (with brass contact 'leaves')
which was the same height and thickness. So stripped one out and sure
enough inside were three HP11 sized cells. ;-)

--
*A nest isn't empty until all their stuff is out of the attic

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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NSM
 
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"Dave Plowman (News)" wrote in message
...

I sometimes wondered if meter makers in the old days used unusual 1.5 volt
cells to stop them being pinched for other uses. Because most old meters
were large enough to take a standard cell.


The batteries were readily available back then.

And although as you say there
were many types, say 50 years ago, the most common were still AA and D, in
the UK, at least.


We had a couple more for flashlights (torches) in NZ not including the
various packs, some with voltage taps. And then there were many types for
transistor radios, tube radios, telephones and photographic gear amongst
others. Almost all gone now. I have a neat RLC bridge which takes a weird
Euro 3 volt cell. I am running it on 2 N cells and a bunch of coins (to make
them fit).

I have an old but good Taylor analogue meter - still useful where you
really don't want a high impedance device. The 15 volt battery is still
available, but not the 1.5. Which was IIRC, an HP11. Looking through the
cats, as you do, and checking dimensions, I discovered an ancient design
of hand lamp or cycle lamp 4.5v battery (with brass contact 'leaves')
which was the same height and thickness. So stripped one out and sure
enough inside were three HP11 sized cells. ;-)


Yep. Times gone by.

N


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