Electronic Schematics (alt.binaries.schematics.electronic) A place to show and share your electronics schematic drawings.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old October 21st 11, 02:54 PM posted to alt.binaries.schematics.electronic
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,022
Default Series, parallel, and series-parallel resistors - series parallel R.pdf



Attached Files
File Type: pdf series parallel R.pdf (81.1 KB, 52 views)

  #2   Report Post  
Old October 22nd 11, 12:03 AM posted to alt.binaries.schematics.electronic
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,022
Default Series, parallel, and series-parallel resistors - series parallel R.pdf

On Fri, 21 Oct 2011 08:54:15 -0500, John Fields
wrote:

--
JF
  #3   Report Post  
Old October 22nd 11, 07:12 AM posted to alt.binaries.schematics.electronic
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2008
Posts: 83
Default Series, parallel, and series-parallel resistors - series parallelR.pdf

John Fields wrote:

A nice PDF. I like it - much better than the text output my
program produces (shown below). I programmed it, using the 18 ohm
resistors mentioned in the original post. Total R is shown in the
right hand column.

I like it better your way, with the schematic and the generic R. It
works works for any value of R; my program does too, but the output
is limited to only one resistor value per run. Your multiplication
factor works for any resistance. Here's the output I got:

10 in parallel = 1.8
9 in parallel = 2
8 in parallel = 2.25
7 in parallel = 2.57142857
6 in parallel = 3
5 in parallel = 3.6
4 in parallel = 4.5
3 in parallel = 6
2 in parallel = 9
1 single resistor = 18
1 in series with 9 in parallel = 20
1 in series with 8 in parallel = 20.25
1 in series with 7 in parallel = 20.5714286
1 in series with 6 in parallel = 21
1 in series with 5 in parallel = 21.6
1 in series with 4 in parallel = 22.5
1 in series with 3 in parallel = 24
1 in series with 2 in parallel = 27
1 in series with 1 in parallel = 36
2 in series with 8 in parallel = 38.25
2 in series with 7 in parallel = 38.5714286
2 in series with 6 in parallel = 39
2 in series with 5 in parallel = 39.6
2 in series with 4 in parallel = 40.5
2 in series with 3 in parallel = 42
2 in series with 2 in parallel = 45
2 in series with 1 in parallel = 54
3 in series with 7 in parallel = 56.5714286
3 in series with 6 in parallel = 57
3 in series with 5 in parallel = 57.6
3 in series with 4 in parallel = 58.5
3 in series with 3 in parallel = 60
3 in series with 2 in parallel = 63
3 in series with 1 in parallel = 72
4 in series with 6 in parallel = 75
4 in series with 5 in parallel = 75.6
4 in series with 4 in parallel = 76.5
4 in series with 3 in parallel = 78
4 in series with 2 in parallel = 81
4 in series with 1 in parallel = 90
5 in series with 5 in parallel = 93.6
5 in series with 4 in parallel = 94.5
5 in series with 3 in parallel = 96
5 in series with 2 in parallel = 99
5 in series with 1 in parallel = 108
6 in series with 4 in parallel = 112.5
6 in series with 3 in parallel = 114
6 in series with 2 in parallel = 117
6 in series with 1 in parallel = 126
7 in series with 3 in parallel = 132
7 in series with 2 in parallel = 135
7 in series with 1 in parallel = 144
8 in series with 2 in parallel = 153
8 in series with 1 in parallel = 162
9 in series with 1 in parallel = 180

Ed
  #4   Report Post  
Old October 22nd 11, 10:53 PM posted to alt.binaries.schematics.electronic
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,022
Default Series, parallel, and series-parallel resistors - series parallel R.pdf

On Sat, 22 Oct 2011 02:12:11 -0400, ehsjr
wrote:

John Fields wrote:

A nice PDF. I like it - much better than the text output my
program produces (shown below). I programmed it, using the 18 ohm
resistors mentioned in the original post. Total R is shown in the
right hand column.

I like it better your way, with the schematic and the generic R. It
works works for any value of R; my program does too, but the output
is limited to only one resistor value per run. Your multiplication
factor works for any resistance. Here's the output I got:

10 in parallel = 1.8
9 in parallel = 2
8 in parallel = 2.25
7 in parallel = 2.57142857
6 in parallel = 3
5 in parallel = 3.6
4 in parallel = 4.5
3 in parallel = 6
2 in parallel = 9
1 single resistor = 18
1 in series with 9 in parallel = 20
1 in series with 8 in parallel = 20.25
1 in series with 7 in parallel = 20.5714286
1 in series with 6 in parallel = 21
1 in series with 5 in parallel = 21.6
1 in series with 4 in parallel = 22.5
1 in series with 3 in parallel = 24
1 in series with 2 in parallel = 27
1 in series with 1 in parallel = 36
2 in series with 8 in parallel = 38.25
2 in series with 7 in parallel = 38.5714286
2 in series with 6 in parallel = 39
2 in series with 5 in parallel = 39.6
2 in series with 4 in parallel = 40.5
2 in series with 3 in parallel = 42
2 in series with 2 in parallel = 45
2 in series with 1 in parallel = 54
3 in series with 7 in parallel = 56.5714286
3 in series with 6 in parallel = 57
3 in series with 5 in parallel = 57.6
3 in series with 4 in parallel = 58.5
3 in series with 3 in parallel = 60
3 in series with 2 in parallel = 63
3 in series with 1 in parallel = 72
4 in series with 6 in parallel = 75
4 in series with 5 in parallel = 75.6
4 in series with 4 in parallel = 76.5
4 in series with 3 in parallel = 78
4 in series with 2 in parallel = 81
4 in series with 1 in parallel = 90
5 in series with 5 in parallel = 93.6
5 in series with 4 in parallel = 94.5
5 in series with 3 in parallel = 96
5 in series with 2 in parallel = 99
5 in series with 1 in parallel = 108
6 in series with 4 in parallel = 112.5
6 in series with 3 in parallel = 114
6 in series with 2 in parallel = 117
6 in series with 1 in parallel = 126
7 in series with 3 in parallel = 132
7 in series with 2 in parallel = 135
7 in series with 1 in parallel = 144
8 in series with 2 in parallel = 153
8 in series with 1 in parallel = 162
9 in series with 1 in parallel = 180


---
Nicely done, and thanks for the kind words. :-)

--
JF
  #5   Report Post  
Old October 23rd 11, 02:33 AM posted to alt.binaries.schematics.electronic
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 620
Default Series, parallel, and series-parallel resistors - series parallel R.pdf


"ehsjr" wrote in message
...
John Fields wrote:

A nice PDF. I like it - much better than the text output my
program produces (shown below). I programmed it, using the 18 ohm
resistors mentioned in the original post. Total R is shown in the
right hand column.

I like it better your way, with the schematic and the generic R. It
works works for any value of R; my program does too, but the output
is limited to only one resistor value per run. Your multiplication
factor works for any resistance. Here's the output I got:

10 in parallel = 1.8
9 in parallel = 2
8 in parallel = 2.25
7 in parallel = 2.57142857
6 in parallel = 3
5 in parallel = 3.6
4 in parallel = 4.5
3 in parallel = 6
2 in parallel = 9
1 single resistor = 18
1 in series with 9 in parallel = 20
1 in series with 8 in parallel = 20.25
1 in series with 7 in parallel = 20.5714286
1 in series with 6 in parallel = 21
1 in series with 5 in parallel = 21.6
1 in series with 4 in parallel = 22.5
1 in series with 3 in parallel = 24
1 in series with 2 in parallel = 27
1 in series with 1 in parallel = 36
2 in series with 8 in parallel = 38.25
2 in series with 7 in parallel = 38.5714286
2 in series with 6 in parallel = 39
2 in series with 5 in parallel = 39.6
2 in series with 4 in parallel = 40.5
2 in series with 3 in parallel = 42
2 in series with 2 in parallel = 45
2 in series with 1 in parallel = 54
3 in series with 7 in parallel = 56.5714286
3 in series with 6 in parallel = 57
3 in series with 5 in parallel = 57.6
3 in series with 4 in parallel = 58.5
3 in series with 3 in parallel = 60
3 in series with 2 in parallel = 63
3 in series with 1 in parallel = 72
4 in series with 6 in parallel = 75
4 in series with 5 in parallel = 75.6
4 in series with 4 in parallel = 76.5
4 in series with 3 in parallel = 78
4 in series with 2 in parallel = 81
4 in series with 1 in parallel = 90
5 in series with 5 in parallel = 93.6
5 in series with 4 in parallel = 94.5
5 in series with 3 in parallel = 96
5 in series with 2 in parallel = 99
5 in series with 1 in parallel = 108
6 in series with 4 in parallel = 112.5
6 in series with 3 in parallel = 114
6 in series with 2 in parallel = 117
6 in series with 1 in parallel = 126
7 in series with 3 in parallel = 132
7 in series with 2 in parallel = 135
7 in series with 1 in parallel = 144
8 in series with 2 in parallel = 153
8 in series with 1 in parallel = 162
9 in series with 1 in parallel = 180

Ed


Maybe I'm missing what you and Ed are trying to show but per the OP
it seems you both are missing some combinations such as
3P in series with 3P = 12ohms.

Art




  #6   Report Post  
Old October 23rd 11, 03:41 AM posted to alt.binaries.schematics.electronic
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,420
Default Series, parallel, and series-parallel resistors - series parallel R.pdf

On Sat, 22 Oct 2011 18:33:18 -0700, "Artemus"
wrote:


"ehsjr" wrote in message
...
John Fields wrote:

A nice PDF. I like it - much better than the text output my
program produces (shown below). I programmed it, using the 18 ohm
resistors mentioned in the original post. Total R is shown in the
right hand column.

I like it better your way, with the schematic and the generic R. It
works works for any value of R; my program does too, but the output
is limited to only one resistor value per run. Your multiplication
factor works for any resistance. Here's the output I got:

10 in parallel = 1.8
9 in parallel = 2
8 in parallel = 2.25
7 in parallel = 2.57142857
6 in parallel = 3
5 in parallel = 3.6
4 in parallel = 4.5
3 in parallel = 6
2 in parallel = 9
1 single resistor = 18
1 in series with 9 in parallel = 20
1 in series with 8 in parallel = 20.25
1 in series with 7 in parallel = 20.5714286
1 in series with 6 in parallel = 21
1 in series with 5 in parallel = 21.6
1 in series with 4 in parallel = 22.5
1 in series with 3 in parallel = 24
1 in series with 2 in parallel = 27
1 in series with 1 in parallel = 36
2 in series with 8 in parallel = 38.25
2 in series with 7 in parallel = 38.5714286
2 in series with 6 in parallel = 39
2 in series with 5 in parallel = 39.6
2 in series with 4 in parallel = 40.5
2 in series with 3 in parallel = 42
2 in series with 2 in parallel = 45
2 in series with 1 in parallel = 54
3 in series with 7 in parallel = 56.5714286
3 in series with 6 in parallel = 57
3 in series with 5 in parallel = 57.6
3 in series with 4 in parallel = 58.5
3 in series with 3 in parallel = 60
3 in series with 2 in parallel = 63
3 in series with 1 in parallel = 72
4 in series with 6 in parallel = 75
4 in series with 5 in parallel = 75.6
4 in series with 4 in parallel = 76.5
4 in series with 3 in parallel = 78
4 in series with 2 in parallel = 81
4 in series with 1 in parallel = 90
5 in series with 5 in parallel = 93.6
5 in series with 4 in parallel = 94.5
5 in series with 3 in parallel = 96
5 in series with 2 in parallel = 99
5 in series with 1 in parallel = 108
6 in series with 4 in parallel = 112.5
6 in series with 3 in parallel = 114
6 in series with 2 in parallel = 117
6 in series with 1 in parallel = 126
7 in series with 3 in parallel = 132
7 in series with 2 in parallel = 135
7 in series with 1 in parallel = 144
8 in series with 2 in parallel = 153
8 in series with 1 in parallel = 162
9 in series with 1 in parallel = 180

Ed


Maybe I'm missing what you and Ed are trying to show but per the OP
it seems you both are missing some combinations such as
3P in series with 3P = 12ohms.

Art


There are a *lot* more combinations, like complex bridged stacks. I
wonder if there is a general way to enumerate them all.

John

  #7   Report Post  
Old October 23rd 11, 02:40 PM posted to alt.binaries.schematics.electronic
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,022
Default Series, parallel, and series-parallel resistors - series parallel R.pdf

On Sat, 22 Oct 2011 18:33:18 -0700, "Artemus"
wrote:


Maybe I'm missing what you and Ed are trying to show but per the OP
it seems you both are missing some combinations such as
3P in series with 3P = 12ohms.

Art


---
I was just trying to show the simplest set of series, parallel, and
series-parallel connections available using from one to ten
equal-valued resistors.

There are, indeed, many more combinations available, one of them being
the 3P in series with 3P:

--+-[R1]-[R2]-[R3]-+--+-[R7]-[R8]-[R9]---+--
| | | |
+-[R4]-[R5]-[R6]-+ +-[R10]-[R11]-[R12]+

but the end-to-end resistance isn't 12 ohms, it's:

(R1+R2+R3)*(R4+R5+R6) (R7+R8+R9)*(R10+R1+R12)
Rt = ----------------------- + -------------------------
R1+R2+R3+R4+R5+R6 R7+R8+R9+R10+R11+R12


54R * 54R 54R * 54R
= ----------- + ----------- = 54 ohms
54R + 54R 54R + 54R

That is, if I interpret what you mean by "3P in series with 3P"
correctly.

If I do, then that's equivalent to "6S in parallel with 6S":

--+-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-+--
| |
+-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-+

Or, simply,

---[R]-[R]-[R]---

Which (except for the fact that you're dealing with 12 resistors
instead of 10) is one of the states illustrated in Ed's and my
example.

--
JF
  #8   Report Post  
Old October 23rd 11, 08:37 PM posted to alt.binaries.schematics.electronic
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 620
Default Series, parallel, and series-parallel resistors - series parallel R.pdf


"John Fields" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 22 Oct 2011 18:33:18 -0700, "Artemus"
wrote:


Maybe I'm missing what you and Ed are trying to show but per the OP
it seems you both are missing some combinations such as
3P in series with 3P = 12ohms.

Art


---
I was just trying to show the simplest set of series, parallel, and
series-parallel connections available using from one to ten
equal-valued resistors.

There are, indeed, many more combinations available, one of them being
the 3P in series with 3P:

--+-[R1]-[R2]-[R3]-+--+-[R7]-[R8]-[R9]---+--
| | | |
+-[R4]-[R5]-[R6]-+ +-[R10]-[R11]-[R12]+

but the end-to-end resistance isn't 12 ohms, it's:

(R1+R2+R3)*(R4+R5+R6) (R7+R8+R9)*(R10+R1+R12)
Rt = ----------------------- + -------------------------
R1+R2+R3+R4+R5+R6 R7+R8+R9+R10+R11+R12


54R * 54R 54R * 54R
= ----------- + ----------- = 54 ohms
54R + 54R 54R + 54R

That is, if I interpret what you mean by "3P in series with 3P"
correctly.

If I do, then that's equivalent to "6S in parallel with 6S":

--+-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-+--
| |
+-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-+

Or, simply,

---[R]-[R]-[R]---

Which (except for the fact that you're dealing with 12 resistors
instead of 10) is one of the states illustrated in Ed's and my
example.

--
JF


Sorry, I didn't mean to be cryptic with my symbols.
3P = 3 18ohm resistors in parallel = 6 ohms.
2 sets of these in series = 12 ohms.
Art



  #9   Report Post  
Old October 23rd 11, 10:50 PM posted to alt.binaries.schematics.electronic
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,022
Default Series, parallel, and series-parallel resistors - series parallel R.pdf

On Sun, 23 Oct 2011 12:37:56 -0700, "Artemus"
wrote:


"John Fields" wrote in message
.. .
On Sat, 22 Oct 2011 18:33:18 -0700, "Artemus"
wrote:


Maybe I'm missing what you and Ed are trying to show but per the OP
it seems you both are missing some combinations such as
3P in series with 3P = 12ohms.

Art


---
I was just trying to show the simplest set of series, parallel, and
series-parallel connections available using from one to ten
equal-valued resistors.

There are, indeed, many more combinations available, one of them being
the 3P in series with 3P:

--+-[R1]-[R2]-[R3]-+--+-[R7]-[R8]-[R9]---+--
| | | |
+-[R4]-[R5]-[R6]-+ +-[R10]-[R11]-[R12]+

but the end-to-end resistance isn't 12 ohms, it's:

(R1+R2+R3)*(R4+R5+R6) (R7+R8+R9)*(R10+R1+R12)
Rt = ----------------------- + -------------------------
R1+R2+R3+R4+R5+R6 R7+R8+R9+R10+R11+R12


54R * 54R 54R * 54R
= ----------- + ----------- = 54 ohms
54R + 54R 54R + 54R

That is, if I interpret what you mean by "3P in series with 3P"
correctly.

If I do, then that's equivalent to "6S in parallel with 6S":

--+-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-+--
| |
+-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-[R]-+

Or, simply,

---[R]-[R]-[R]---

Which (except for the fact that you're dealing with 12 resistors
instead of 10) is one of the states illustrated in Ed's and my
example.

--
JF


Sorry, I didn't mean to be cryptic with my symbols.
3P = 3 18ohm resistors in parallel = 6 ohms.
2 sets of these in series = 12 ohms.
Art


---
Ah, I get it now.

|-0.67R-|
| |
+-[R]-[R]-+
| |
+-[R]-[R]-+
| |
+-[R]-[R]-+

--
JF
  #10   Report Post  
Old October 25th 11, 12:07 AM posted to alt.binaries.schematics.electronic
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2008
Posts: 83
Default Series, parallel, and series-parallel resistors - series parallelR.pdf

Artemus wrote:
"ehsjr" wrote in message
...

John Fields wrote:

A nice PDF. I like it - much better than the text output my
program produces (shown below). I programmed it, using the 18 ohm
resistors mentioned in the original post. Total R is shown in the
right hand column.

I like it better your way, with the schematic and the generic R. It
works works for any value of R; my program does too, but the output
is limited to only one resistor value per run. Your multiplication
factor works for any resistance. Here's the output I got:

10 in parallel = 1.8
9 in parallel = 2
8 in parallel = 2.25
7 in parallel = 2.57142857
6 in parallel = 3
5 in parallel = 3.6
4 in parallel = 4.5
3 in parallel = 6
2 in parallel = 9
1 single resistor = 18
1 in series with 9 in parallel = 20
1 in series with 8 in parallel = 20.25
1 in series with 7 in parallel = 20.5714286
1 in series with 6 in parallel = 21
1 in series with 5 in parallel = 21.6
1 in series with 4 in parallel = 22.5
1 in series with 3 in parallel = 24
1 in series with 2 in parallel = 27
1 in series with 1 in parallel = 36
2 in series with 8 in parallel = 38.25
2 in series with 7 in parallel = 38.5714286
2 in series with 6 in parallel = 39
2 in series with 5 in parallel = 39.6
2 in series with 4 in parallel = 40.5
2 in series with 3 in parallel = 42
2 in series with 2 in parallel = 45
2 in series with 1 in parallel = 54
3 in series with 7 in parallel = 56.5714286
3 in series with 6 in parallel = 57
3 in series with 5 in parallel = 57.6
3 in series with 4 in parallel = 58.5
3 in series with 3 in parallel = 60
3 in series with 2 in parallel = 63
3 in series with 1 in parallel = 72
4 in series with 6 in parallel = 75
4 in series with 5 in parallel = 75.6
4 in series with 4 in parallel = 76.5
4 in series with 3 in parallel = 78
4 in series with 2 in parallel = 81
4 in series with 1 in parallel = 90
5 in series with 5 in parallel = 93.6
5 in series with 4 in parallel = 94.5
5 in series with 3 in parallel = 96
5 in series with 2 in parallel = 99
5 in series with 1 in parallel = 108
6 in series with 4 in parallel = 112.5
6 in series with 3 in parallel = 114
6 in series with 2 in parallel = 117
6 in series with 1 in parallel = 126
7 in series with 3 in parallel = 132
7 in series with 2 in parallel = 135
7 in series with 1 in parallel = 144
8 in series with 2 in parallel = 153
8 in series with 1 in parallel = 162
9 in series with 1 in parallel = 180

Ed



Maybe I'm missing what you and Ed are trying to show but per the OP
it seems you both are missing some combinations such as
3P in series with 3P = 12ohms.

Art



It's not meant to show all possible combinations. It's meant to
show the simple ones in the form shown on John's pdf. I.E. one single
set of parallel resistors in series with one single set of series
resistors, or those that are purely parallel or purely series.
I thought the configurations I had in mind were obvious in the original
thread, but apparently they weren't.

What's glaring here is in my ugly text output. It shows Rs + Rp, where
Rs is the equivalent resistance of the specified number of resistors
in series, and Rp is the equivalent resistance of the specified number
of resistors in parallel. However, the set of parallel resistors was
allowed to consist of a single resistor in my program. One resistor
does not make a parallel set! For example, it says "9 in series with 1
in parallel". I needed to change the it to show the resistors in series
where it said "with 1 in parallel".
The new output appears below.

Ed

10 in parallel = 1.8
9 in parallel = 2
8 in parallel = 2.25
7 in parallel = 2.57142857
6 in parallel = 3
5 in parallel = 3.6
4 in parallel = 4.5
3 in parallel = 6
2 in parallel = 9
1 single resistor = 18
1 in series with 9 in parallel = 20
1 in series with 8 in parallel = 20.25
1 in series with 7 in parallel = 20.5714286
1 in series with 6 in parallel = 21
1 in series with 5 in parallel = 21.6
1 in series with 4 in parallel = 22.5
1 in series with 3 in parallel = 24
1 in series with 2 in parallel = 27
2 in series = 36
2 in series with 8 in parallel = 38.25
2 in series with 7 in parallel = 38.5714286
2 in series with 6 in parallel = 39
2 in series with 5 in parallel = 39.6
2 in series with 4 in parallel = 40.5
2 in series with 3 in parallel = 42
2 in series with 2 in parallel = 45
3 in series = 54
3 in series with 7 in parallel = 56.5714286
3 in series with 6 in parallel = 57
3 in series with 5 in parallel = 57.6
3 in series with 4 in parallel = 58.5
3 in series with 3 in parallel = 60
3 in series with 2 in parallel = 63
4 in series = 72
4 in series with 6 in parallel = 75
4 in series with 5 in parallel = 75.6
4 in series with 4 in parallel = 76.5
4 in series with 3 in parallel = 78
4 in series with 2 in parallel = 81
5 in series = 90
5 in series with 5 in parallel = 93.6
5 in series with 4 in parallel = 94.5
5 in series with 3 in parallel = 96
5 in series with 2 in parallel = 99
6 in series = 108
6 in series with 4 in parallel = 112.5
6 in series with 3 in parallel = 114
6 in series with 2 in parallel = 117
7 in series = 126
7 in series with 3 in parallel = 132
7 in series with 2 in parallel = 135
8 in series = 144
8 in series with 2 in parallel = 153
9 in series = 162
10 in series = 180


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Jet Parallel Clamps... NOT Parallel? -MIKE- Woodworking 31 April 1st 10 02:15 AM
Dual (elec and wood) furnaces. Route air ducting in series or parallel? Any preferences? dean Home Repair 0 October 25th 05 03:35 PM
Carrier Performance series vs. Ruud Achiever series home AC? Airkings Home Repair 1 June 20th 05 11:03 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:19 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017