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Old May 18th 19, 02:59 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
Neon John Neon John is offline
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 280
Default How To: Remove a cracked set screw

On Fri, 17 May 2019 19:43:54 -0700, "Bob La Londe"
wrote:

There is a cracked set screw in one of m Kwik 200 tool holders. Itís a 1/2
inch holder so its one of the most common and cheapest to find used. That
being said there aren't as many used Kwik 200 tool holders to be found on
the most obvious source (Ebay) as their used to be. I hate to pitch a tool
holder I already have over such a cheap part.

Here is the problem. There is a tool in the holder and its well secured. I
want to take the tool out, but even a clean crisp brand new hex key just
pops around like the screw is rounded, but its not. I'd like to save the
tool in the holder other wise I might be tempted to press it out.


Two solutions:

1 EDM An EDM power supply is fairly easy to make. I use soft
drafting lead (4H) as the machining tool. Fill the hole with kerosene
and with a steady hand (or a drill press, slowly bore a hole straight
through the set screw. That usually relieves the stress enough to
unscrew. If not, move the tool sideways in the hole to cut a slot
almost to the tool post threads.

2. broken stud welding rod. I'm not sure who owns the rod now, as
they've been bought out several times. This is a specialty rod.
Simply poke it down into the hole until an arc starts against the
setscrew. The rod coating forms a protective coating on the threads
that prevents neither an arc forming nor damage to the threads.

build the post of weld metal high enough that vice grips or channel
locks can get a grip. Simply unscrew the assembly. The protective
flux chips off as the broken screw comes out.

I used to own a welding supply wholesale company with a retail
showroom. This company made a wide variety of specialty rods. Came
in packs of 5 rods if I recall. Somewhat expensive but when ya gotta
have 'em.

John
John DeArmond
http://www.neon-john.com
http://www.tnduction.com
Tellico Plains, Occupied TN
See website for email address