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Electrical help: 20 amp vs 30 amp



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 7th 05, 11:16 PM
loutent
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Default Electrical help: 20 amp vs 30 amp

I had an electrical question a few months ago about this, and got
several varied responses - mainly because I did not have enough
information I believe. Now I actually have something to
work with!

I have a brand new Grizzly 1023SL sitting in the basement
(almost) ready to plug in. I have a copper,10 gauge (3 wire - ground,
neutral, hot) coming from a 30 amp (unused) breaker which used to
power a water heater (now gas). Our house has 200 amp service and
is less than 20 years old (just for reference).

Grizzly recommends 20 amp/220. Do I need to change
out the 30 breaker for a 20? If I leave it as is, will I
harm the magnetic switch or anything else?

Thanks for any input.

Lou
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  #2  
Old January 7th 05, 11:34 PM
Roger Shoaf
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"loutent" wrote in message
...
I had an electrical question a few months ago about this, and got
several varied responses - mainly because I did not have enough
information I believe. Now I actually have something to
work with!

I have a brand new Grizzly 1023SL sitting in the basement
(almost) ready to plug in. I have a copper,10 gauge (3 wire - ground,
neutral, hot) coming from a 30 amp (unused) breaker which used to
power a water heater (now gas). Our house has 200 amp service and
is less than 20 years old (just for reference).

Grizzly recommends 20 amp/220. Do I need to change
out the 30 breaker for a 20? If I leave it as is, will I
harm the magnetic switch or anything else?

Thanks for any input.

Lou


Go ahead and use the circuit. The circuit breaker is there to protect your
wires. Your saw probably has an overload cutout on the motor.

Plugging your saw into a bigger circuit is like plugging a night light into
a circuit that could power a toaster. No problem.

--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
they come up with this striped stuff.


  #3  
Old January 7th 05, 11:47 PM
LRod
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Default

On Fri, 07 Jan 2005 17:16:31 -0500, loutent wrote:

I had an electrical question a few months ago about this, and got
several varied responses - mainly because I did not have enough
information I believe. Now I actually have something to
work with!

I have a brand new Grizzly 1023SL sitting in the basement
(almost) ready to plug in. I have a copper,10 gauge (3 wire - ground,
neutral, hot) coming from a 30 amp (unused) breaker which used to
power a water heater (now gas). Our house has 200 amp service and
is less than 20 years old (just for reference).

Grizzly recommends 20 amp/220. Do I need to change
out the 30 breaker for a 20? If I leave it as is, will I
harm the magnetic switch or anything else?


Roger's analogy is right. You don't sweat running your electric shaver
on that 20A bathroom breaker, do you?

The other thing is make sure your terms are straight when you're
describing your situation. You actually have a copper, 10 gauge (3
wire - ground, hot,, hot) coming from a 30 amp (unused) breaker which
used to power a water heater (now gas). The fact that it used to power
a water heater tells us it's a 240V circuit protected by a 30A
breaker, thus the wires are hot, hot, ground. There is no neutral in a
240V circuit (North America).


- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net
  #4  
Old January 7th 05, 11:58 PM
Slowhand
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"loutent" wrote in message
...
I had an electrical question a few months ago about this, and got
several varied responses - mainly because I did not have enough
information I believe. Now I actually have something to
work with!

I have a brand new Grizzly 1023SL sitting in the basement
(almost) ready to plug in. I have a copper,10 gauge (3 wire - ground,
neutral, hot) coming from a 30 amp (unused) breaker which used to
power a water heater (now gas). Our house has 200 amp service and
is less than 20 years old (just for reference).

Grizzly recommends 20 amp/220. Do I need to change
out the 30 breaker for a 20? If I leave it as is, will I
harm the magnetic switch or anything else?


Use the 30 amp. Also, the power would be hot, hot, ground and NOT neutral,
hot, ground.
SH - The "used to wire houses" woodworker


  #5  
Old January 7th 05, 11:58 PM
BAF
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Default

Lou,



Sounds like you're confusing 110 with 220



To run your Griz Table Saw (I have the 1023Z) you need to add a 220 breaker (looks like 2 breakers in 1 and takes up 2 slots) to you panel and then have a 4 wire cable (Neutral, ground, 110 Phase A, 110 Phase B) run to the saw.



The gauge of the wire is determined by the distance the saw is from the panel and the amount of current it will draw (in your case 20 Amps). There's a formula for this but I don't have it handy so you should really have someone who knows what they're doing (electrician?) help you if you have any doubt about doing it yourself!



Good Luck



BAF

Woodworking Business Apprentice Program




"loutent" wrote in message ...
I had an electrical question a few months ago about this, and got
several varied responses - mainly because I did not have enough
information I believe. Now I actually have something to
work with!

I have a brand new Grizzly 1023SL sitting in the basement
(almost) ready to plug in. I have a copper,10 gauge (3 wire - ground,
neutral, hot) coming from a 30 amp (unused) breaker which used to
power a water heater (now gas). Our house has 200 amp service and
is less than 20 years old (just for reference).

Grizzly recommends 20 amp/220. Do I need to change
out the 30 breaker for a 20? If I leave it as is, will I
harm the magnetic switch or anything else?

Thanks for any input.

Lou

  #6  
Old January 8th 05, 12:04 AM
Leon
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"loutent" wrote in message
...

Grizzly recommends 20 amp/220. Do I need to change
out the 30 breaker for a 20? If I leave it as is, will I
harm the magnetic switch or anything else?


Grizzly is probably referring to a minimum vs. an exact recommendation.
Use it. I have my TS sharing a 50 amp circuit with a clothes dryer.
Like Roger has indicated, the 20 amp breaker is not to protect you saw.


  #7  
Old January 8th 05, 12:08 AM
toller
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You "can" do it, as long as you use a 30a plug and outlet.

Personally I would do the whole thing as 20a. Code only requires the
breaker to protect the house wiring, but it is nice when it protects the
machine wiring also. I bet when you compare 20a outlet/plugs to 30a, it is
actually cheaper to replace the breaker.


  #8  
Old January 8th 05, 12:11 AM
Leon
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"LRod" wrote in message
...

The other thing is make sure your terms are straight when you're
describing your situation. You actually have a copper, 10 gauge (3
wire - ground, hot,, hot) coming from a 30 amp (unused) breaker which
used to power a water heater (now gas). The fact that it used to power
a water heater tells us it's a 240V circuit protected by a 30A
breaker, thus the wires are hot, hot, ground. There is no neutral in a
240V circuit (North America).


With that in mind, and I agree about ground, hot, hot on a 3 wire set up.
Many newer homes with 220 have 4 wires, 1 being ground. What do you call
the other 3?


  #9  
Old January 8th 05, 12:11 AM
Duane Bozarth
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Leon wrote:

....
...I have my TS sharing a 50 amp circuit with a clothes dryer.


Don't think that's code unless you're using the dryer outlet or the saw,
not both?
  #10  
Old January 8th 05, 12:19 AM
DJ Delorie
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LRod writes:
There is no neutral in a 240V circuit (North America).


There can be, it's a 4-wire circuit (black hot, red hot, white
neutral, bare ground) used for multi-voltage appliances like ovens and
dryers (240 for heat, 120 for lights, etc).

But a 3-wire 240 doesn't have a neutral. Or at least, it isn't
*supposed* to have a neutral. Circuits wired for 240v without a
neutral *should* have the white wire tagged with red tape or something
to indicate that it's not a neutral.
 




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