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Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 5th 10, 02:34 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 10
Default Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling

While visiting my sister-in-law in Suffolk, Va. a couple years ago, she
asked if I knew of a good way to clean or brighten up the paneling in her
kitchen and dining room. It just looked too darned good to give her an
off-the-wall answer. (read as I didn't have a clue)

The house was built approximately 1965 and I'm sure she has used lots of TLC
because the paneling looks great, but I'm sure it has darkened considerably
over the years. Because of waxing, cooking, or cigarette smoke I've no
idea. I suspect all of the above, and maybe more.

We are planning another trip 'back east' this year and I thought it would
be nice when we drop in to see her to have an answer to her question.

The only thing I can think of offhand is TSP. Any hints or suggestions
would be greatly appreciated!

Thermo


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  #2  
Old March 5th 10, 02:53 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 3,479
Default Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling

On 3/4/2010 6:34 PM thermo102 spake thus:

While visiting my sister-in-law in Suffolk, Va. a couple years ago, she
asked if I knew of a good way to clean or brighten up the paneling in her
kitchen and dining room. It just looked too darned good to give her an
off-the-wall answer. (read as I didn't have a clue)

The house was built approximately 1965 and I'm sure she has used lots of TLC
because the paneling looks great, but I'm sure it has darkened considerably
over the years. Because of waxing, cooking, or cigarette smoke I've no
idea. I suspect all of the above, and maybe more.

The only thing I can think of offhand is TSP. Any hints or suggestions
would be greatly appreciated!


TSP is a really good cleaner, but unfortunately it will probably
de-gloss whatever finish is on the paneling (I'm assuming the paneling
is either varnished or lacquered and not just raw wood). This would be
OK if you were planning on putting more finish on it, but otherwise it
probably wouldn't be a good choice. I'd try to find something a little
less aggressive, like probably any good household cleaner. (My own
favorite is Simple Green, which can be used on just about anything and
can be mixed in various dilutions depending on how bad the dirt is.)

To get off things like sticky grease that may have accumulated over the
years, you may need some kind of petroleum solvent, like naphtha,
mineral spirits, paint thinner (thinner, not stripper!), etc. Can be
used when you can open up doors and windows to air out the room.

By the way, none of this is going to affect the darkening of the
paneling. That's due to darkening of both the wood and the finish over
it, and cleaning it isn't going to lighten it.


--
You were wrong, and I'm man enough to admit it.

- a Usenet "apology"
  #3  
Old March 5th 10, 03:11 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 598
Default Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling


"thermo102" wrote in message
...
While visiting my sister-in-law in Suffolk, Va. a couple years ago, she
asked if I knew of a good way to clean or brighten up the paneling in her
kitchen and dining room. It just looked too darned good to give her an
off-the-wall answer. (read as I didn't have a clue)

The house was built approximately 1965 and I'm sure she has used lots of TLC
because the paneling looks great, but I'm sure it has darkened considerably
over the years. Because of waxing, cooking, or cigarette smoke I've no
idea. I suspect all of the above, and maybe more.

We are planning another trip 'back east' this year and I thought it would
be nice when we drop in to see her to have an answer to her question.

The only thing I can think of offhand is TSP. Any hints or suggestions
would be greatly appreciated!

Thermo

The house I grew up in had knotty pine T&G boards on the walls. When
you say "real" knotty pine paneling I'm assuming you don't mean plywood.
TSP is a good start and it may take several applications to remove 45 years
of kitchen grime. Use plenty of elbow grease and don't worry about damaging
the wood as it isn't just a few thousandths of an inch veneer. Be aware that
TSP will likely dull the finish.
I don't remember polyurethane being available back then so your finish is likely
to be lacquer (Deft was readily available) or varnish. If you have to strip the
finish, lacquer can be removed with lacquer thinner and a cloth. If it's
varnish
you will probably have to use a commercial stripper. The usual precautions
apply.
If you are expecting to get the appearance to look like it was when new you
will have to sand or plane the surface of the boards to remove all traces of
the finish and the oxidized wood surface.
Art







  #4  
Old March 5th 10, 03:23 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 850
Default Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling


"thermo102" wrote in message
...
While visiting my sister-in-law in Suffolk, Va. a couple years ago, she
asked if I knew of a good way to clean or brighten up the paneling in her
kitchen and dining room. It just looked too darned good to give her an
off-the-wall answer. (read as I didn't have a clue)

The house was built approximately 1965 and I'm sure she has used lots of
TLC because the paneling looks great, but I'm sure it has darkened
considerably over the years. Because of waxing, cooking, or cigarette
smoke I've no idea. I suspect all of the above, and maybe more.

We are planning another trip 'back east' this year and I thought it would
be nice when we drop in to see her to have an answer to her question.

The only thing I can think of offhand is TSP. Any hints or suggestions
would be greatly appreciated!



Wood Preen may do the job... I used to use it to clean floors, chair arms,
etc., that tended to get dirty and need waxing too. It will remove the
existing dirty wax. If the surface is really built up and dirty it might
take a bit of rubbing to keep it wet long enough for the cleaners to work
.....

http://www.amazon.com/SaraLee-Kiwi-5.../dp/B000ATUKBA

John

  #5  
Old March 5th 10, 04:47 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 157
Default Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling


.... she asked if I knew of a good way to clean or brighten up the paneling in her
kitchen and dining room. ....

.... it has darkened considerably over the years. *Because of waxing, cooking, or cigarette smoke I've no
idea. *I suspect all of the above, and maybe more.


The only thing I can think of offhand is TSP.


I would not use TSP - it, essentially, dissolves oils.

First, try the least aggressive method. I recommend Murphy's Oil Soap:

http://www.colgate.com/MurphyOilSoap...iginal-formula

We've been using this for a long time.
  #6  
Old March 5th 10, 09:50 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 379
Default Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling

In article ,
thermo102 wrote:
While visiting my sister-in-law in Suffolk, Va. a couple years ago, she
asked if I knew of a good way to clean or brighten up the paneling in her
kitchen and dining room. It just looked too darned good to give her an
off-the-wall answer. (read as I didn't have a clue)

The house was built approximately 1965 and I'm sure she has used lots of TLC
because the paneling looks great, but I'm sure it has darkened considerably
over the years. Because of waxing, cooking, or cigarette smoke I've no
idea. I suspect all of the above, and maybe more.

We are planning another trip 'back east' this year and I thought it would
be nice when we drop in to see her to have an answer to her question.

The only thing I can think of offhand is TSP. Any hints or suggestions
would be greatly appreciated!


the REAL TSP (Tri-Sodium-Phosphate) will do the trick. It will likely
have an adverse affect on whatever finish is on the wood, however.

First thing I'd try is one of the 'citrus' cleaners, like "Simple Green".
These are amazingly effective against lots grime and accumulated gunge..

My preferred 'next stage' weapons are difficult to locate these days.
Second is powdered "ethoxylated alcohol". There used to be a product
available regionally (upper Mid-West) called "Perfex", that listed this
compound as the only ingredient. White 'powder' -- actually 'slivers',
about 1/4" long. Dissolve in water and 'go'. Good for cleaning *anything*,
with only slight differences in the strength of the solution. Worked a *lot*
better the hotter the water. Safe for bare-hands use at any rational
concentration (as long as you could tolerate the temperature) -- the solution
feels 'slick' (alkaline) -- chemistry research says it's a high-grade
"surfactant"; aka wetting agent. (One caveat: Do -not- use at high strengths
on enamel paints, it will cause the paint to chalk continually!! There's a
story *still* told in our family about how somebody did that to a painted picnic
table, circa _60_ years ago. Got all the bird sh*t off (it had lived under a
big tree), but 'left it's mark' on everybody that sat on the benches, _days_
later

History: Invented in Shenandoah Iowa, during WWII as an alternate to phosphate-
based cleaners, as phosphate was a strategic war material for building explosives.
Acquired by Tidy House Corp., who was subsequently acquired by the maker of Air
Wick Air fresheners, who pulled the product off the market.

Rumor mill has it that 'somebody' in Shenandoah, IA is making the product again,
but I've had no luck finding a name or reference -- I''m no longer in the
territory.

[Note: if I had a source to recommend, an ethoxylated alcohol powder would by
my _first_ recommendation! But, I don't, so I suggested something 'obtainable'
first. wry grin ]


Thirdly, there's a petroleum-jelly based product -- sold in a "big" tooth-paste-
like tube, called "Off!" (yes, it even looks similar to the insect spray logo).
This is a degreaser, sold for getting oil-based stains out of laundry, but
works wonders on other oil-based problems. As good, if not better, than 'Goo
Gone' for cleaning oil-dirtied hands, for example.


About the only thing I've run into that one of those three items wouldn't
take off was dried on oil-based wiping stain on my hands. For -that-, a
_Brillo_ pad was _the_ weapon of choice. didn't take much scrubbing, seems
like it was mostly the soap in the pad. Note: Other brands did _not_ work
nearly the same. I found _that_ out the hard way. *ONCE*!!

  #7  
Old March 5th 10, 01:18 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 9,135
Default Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling

On 3/4/2010 8:34 PM, thermo102 wrote:

The house was built approximately 1965 and I'm sure she has used lots of TLC
because the paneling looks great, but I'm sure it has darkened considerably
over the years. Because of waxing, cooking, or cigarette smoke I've no
idea. I suspect all of the above, and maybe more.


My old house had the same pine paneling and here's what I did:

Use any all purpose household cleaner that contains "orange oil". Put
damp sponge in microwave for 30 to 40 seconds, apply cleaner to paneling
with hot sponge. For tough areas leave cleaner on for a minute or so.

Rinse sponge, reheat sponge, repeat.

You will want to wear gloves with the hot sponge.

--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
KarlC@ (the obvious)
  #8  
Old March 5th 10, 05:03 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 17
Default Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling

Ok boys... schooch over and let a woman do the cleaning.

First NO SCOTCH BRITE OR STEEL WOOL. They will scratch, and you'll be sorry.

As mentioned above, Murphys Oil Soap.
Great for cleaning wood, will not damage the finish or your hands.

Use a bucket of hot water with a good glug or three of the cleaner in the
water and scrub with a microfiber towel. The microfiber towels are great for
cleaning. Something about them has a little more grip than terry cloth when
it comes to crud. Sams has/had a big pack of them for around $10 awhile
back. Harbor freight has them too. If you shop around you can find them
pretty cheap.

For areas that have buildup of grime on them, apply some to the rag full
strength and let it sit for a little while.

If that doesn't get the crud off, get some Greased Lightning. (Home Depot,
Wally World)
That stuff will clean anything. I've never had it damage a finish yet but I
haven't used it on a varnished surface. Test on an inconspicious area first.

Sometimes cooking grease will soften a finish or paint making it gooey.
If that's the case, it's going to be a huge project having to strip the
finish off and refinish it.

The wood and finish may have darkend with age. No way to reverse that
without a complete refinish.
Nicotine will stain too. No way to remove the stain without refinishing but
what is on the surface can be cleaned up to make a big difference..


Kate


  #9  
Old March 5th 10, 07:36 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 3,479
Default Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling

On 3/5/2010 9:03 AM Kate spake thus:

Ok boys... schooch over and let a woman do the cleaning.

First NO SCOTCH BRITE OR STEEL WOOL. They will scratch, and you'll be sorry.

As mentioned above, Murphys Oil Soap.
Great for cleaning wood, will not damage the finish or your hands.


[snip]

You know, I'm ready to get on board with all your suggestions except for
the one about Murphy's.

What the hell *is* this stuff, anyhow? It seems to have an almost
cult-ish following, but it's not clear at all what it actually is. Is it
soap made from oil? Does it contain oil?

I've used Murphy's, and it seems like mediocre soap at best. Certainly
no better than my preference, which is Simple Green. Or really any soap
for that matter. In my experience, the type of soap doesn't really
matter: it's pretty much all the same stuff, whether it's dish
detergent, hand soap, or whatever the most highly-marketed stuff in a
spray bottle (409, Mr. Clean, etc., etc.) happens to be.

Speaking of cult soaps, does anyone else here remember Fels Naphtha
soap? I remember my mom using this stuff, which was some of the
worst-smelling soap I've ever been around. Do they still make this stuff?


(Huh, whaddya know: it looks like it's still being made.)


--
You were wrong, and I'm man enough to admit it.

- a Usenet "apology"
  #10  
Old March 5th 10, 07:43 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 3,479
Default Cleaning 'real' knotty pine paneling

On 3/5/2010 11:36 AM David Nebenzahl spake thus:

Speaking of cult soaps, does anyone else here remember Fels Naphtha
soap? I remember my mom using this stuff, which was some of the
worst-smelling soap I've ever been around. Do they still make this stuff?


Still being made: http://www.felsnaptha.com (and I misspelled it,
although really *they* misspelled "naphtha", although it doesn't contain
any of that stuff ...)

Ingredients:

Soap (sodium tallowate*, sodium cocoate* (or) sodium palmate
kernelate*, and sodium palmate*), water, talc, cocnut acid*, palm acid*,
tallow acid*, PEG-6 methyl ether, glycerin, sorbitol, sodium chloride,
pentasodium pentetate and/or tetrasodium etidronate, titatium dioxide,
fragrance, Acid Orange (CI 20170), Acid yellow 73 (ci43350)

*contains one or more of these ingredients


--
You were wrong, and I'm man enough to admit it.

- a Usenet "apology"
 




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