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Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 4th 10, 01:43 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 15
Default Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal


"mikenj" wrote in message
...
I have a Sears Model Number 113.197150 radial arm saw that is late
eighties/early nineties vintage. The blade jammed into a piece of wood
and now the motor hums, but does not spin when I turn it on. I have
replaced the capacitor, but no luck. I wanted to take the motor off
and have an electric motor shop take a look at it, but I can't figure
out how to disconnect the power cord from the arm. Do I need to take
the arm apart to get to the wire connections or do I try to take the
motor apart? I can't figure out how to take the arm apart to get to
the wires.


If the motor has accessible carbon commutator brushes, I would remove them,
check for damaged brush ends, check motor rotation without them and
reinstall or replace them, before disassembling the entire arm.


Ads
  #12  
Old February 4th 10, 05:47 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,160
Default Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal

On Feb 4, 5:43*am, "Anon" wrote:
"mikenj" wrote in message

...

I have a Sears Model Number 113.197150 radial arm saw that is late
eighties/early nineties vintage. The blade jammed into a piece of wood
and now the motor hums, but does not spin when I turn it on. I have
replaced the capacitor, but no luck.


If the motor has accessible carbon commutator brushes,


The kind of motor that has brushes doesn't need or have a capacitor;
the capacitor usually works with a 'start switch' which can be kept
open by a speck of sawdust. Cleaning that switch is the goal of
disassembly, and commonly one must remove one of the ends
(bell housing) of the motor to get to it. It'll the the end housing
that
has the electrical wiring connections.
  #13  
Old February 4th 10, 08:07 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 8
Default Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal

On Feb 4, 12:47*pm, whit3rd wrote:
On Feb 4, 5:43*am, "Anon" wrote:

"mikenj" wrote in message


....


I have a Sears Model Number 113.197150 radial arm saw that is late
eighties/early nineties vintage. The blade jammed into a piece of wood
and now the motor hums, but does not spin when I turn it on. I have
replaced the capacitor, but no luck.

If the motor has accessible carbon commutator brushes,


The kind of motor that has brushes doesn't need or have a capacitor;
the capacitor usually works with a 'start switch' which can be kept
open by a speck of sawdust. *Cleaning that switch is the goal of
disassembly, and commonly one must remove one of the ends
(bell *housing) of the motor to get to it. *It'll the the end housing
that
has the electrical wiring connections.


You are correct that this motor has a capacitor and from my limited
experience, was the only easy component that I can access within the
motor. Also in this compartment are the 110/220v terminals. I did not
see any switch inside the motor, unless you mean the start switch
located in the arm. I have not opened that up yet, but have studied
the diagram and will give it a try this weekend. As far as the motor,
there is not much exposed as far as winding and brushes - it is a very
sefl-contained unit except for the access to the capacitor. There are
some hefty star screws with ominous warnings of removal which can
cause misalignment. In any case, I do not have the drivers to unscrew
them. I can do the basic stuff like disassemble and clean, but if the
motor needs work, I will take it to a motor shop; otherwise it's $160
for a new motor - not very attractive.
  #14  
Old February 4th 10, 08:30 PM posted to rec.woodworking
dpb
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Posts: 10,329
Default Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal

mikenj wrote:
....

You are correct that this motor has a capacitor and from my limited
experience, was the only easy component that I can access within the
motor. Also in this compartment are the 110/220v terminals. I did not
see any switch inside the motor, unless you mean the start switch
located in the arm. ...


No, the centriugal switch that switches the start cap out of the circuit
at speed.

If it ain't even hummin', that's not it. But, if it is a contacts
problem, try taking the air hose and nozzle and blowing the housing out
good.

I looked at the exploded drawing somebody showed link to a little --
they're not great for the specific purpose but it appears the leads to
the switch are the simplest to get to likely as looks like motor-end
connections are in the housing as opposed to a junction box.

There's bound to be a way in, simply start looking at the covers
carefully, it's possible there's a snap-on cover over arm assembly.

The old small DeWalt I have has a set of screws on the front end of the
switch cover that is a starting point, after that there's a cover on the
top of the arm that is dust protection and cosmetics for the innards of
the arm from the top. I forget otomh whether it just snaps on or is
held by the side pieces that have the scale imprinted on them.

Overall, it can't be too complicated, just takes some detective work to
see what went together last, hence comes apart first.

--
  #15  
Old February 5th 10, 01:34 AM posted to rec.woodworking
Max
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Posts: 767
Default Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal



"mikenj" wrote


I have a Sears Model Number 113.197150 radial arm saw that is late
eighties/early nineties vintage. The blade jammed into a piece of wood
and now the motor hums, but does not spin when I turn it on. I have
replaced the capacitor, but no luck. I wanted to take the motor off
and have an electric motor shop take a look at it, but I can't figure
out how to disconnect the power cord from the arm. Do I need to take
the arm apart to get to the wire connections or do I try to take the
motor apart? I can't figure out how to take the arm apart to get to
the wires.



I have a .199350 version of the saw.
Several years ago I replaced the electric cord with a longer one.
As I recall, I took off the end plates of the arm and the cover then slips
off.
You can reach the terminals under the cover. (if that's what you're looking
for)

Max


  #16  
Old February 5th 10, 04:19 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 4,057
Default Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal

On 2/4/10 7:34 PM, Max wrote:


"mikenj" wrote


I have a Sears Model Number 113.197150 radial arm saw that is late
eighties/early nineties vintage. The blade jammed into a piece of wood
and now the motor hums, but does not spin when I turn it on. I have
replaced the capacitor, but no luck. I wanted to take the motor off
and have an electric motor shop take a look at it, but I can't figure
out how to disconnect the power cord from the arm. Do I need to take
the arm apart to get to the wire connections or do I try to take the
motor apart? I can't figure out how to take the arm apart to get to
the wires.



I have a .199350 version of the saw.
Several years ago I replaced the electric cord with a longer one.
As I recall, I took off the end plates of the arm and the cover then
slips off.
You can reach the terminals under the cover. (if that's what you're
looking for)

Max


Nope, it's different.
Yours is like mine, but not the same as his.


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
http://mikedrums.com

---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply

  #17  
Old February 6th 10, 03:47 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 509
Default Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal

On Feb 3, 2:49*pm, mikenj wrote:
I have a Sears Model Number 113.197150 radial arm saw that is late
eighties/early nineties vintage. The blade jammed into a piece of wood
and now the motor hums, but does not spin when I turn it on. I have
replaced the capacitor, but no luck. I wanted to take the motor off
and have an electric motor shop take a look at it, but I can't figure
out how to disconnect the power cord from the arm. Do I need to take
the arm apart to get to the wire connections or do I try to take the
motor apart? I can't figure out how to take the arm apart to get to
the wires.


On mine, the front plate on the arm is removed and the motor assembly
rolled forward and off the arm. The Electrical cable was held by a
small clamp screwed to the rear of the arm. When I removed the screw
that held the clamp/cable in place, the entire motor assembly was
ready to take to the "motor shop."

If you look closely on that motor, you may spy a small red button
somewhere on the motor itself. This is a RESET BUTTON. If the blade
turns freely (with the power off, pleas!) try pressing this little red
button. Then plug it back in and turn on the power switch'

If this works, send my check to The Salvation Army in a rasonable
amount.

  #18  
Old February 6th 10, 04:35 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 8
Default Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal

On Feb 5, 10:47*pm, Hoosierpopi wrote:
On Feb 3, 2:49*pm, mikenj wrote:

I have a Sears Model Number 113.197150 radial arm saw that is late
eighties/early nineties vintage. The blade jammed into a piece of wood
and now the motor hums, but does not spin when I turn it on. I have
replaced the capacitor, but no luck. I wanted to take the motor off
and have an electric motor shop take a look at it, but I can't figure
out how to disconnect the power cord from the arm. Do I need to take
the arm apart to get to the wire connections or do I try to take the
motor apart? I can't figure out how to take the arm apart to get to
the wires.


On mine, the front plate on the arm is removed and the motor assembly
rolled forward and off the arm. The Electrical cable was held by a
small clamp screwed to the rear of the arm. When I removed the screw
that held the clamp/cable in place, the entire motor assembly was
ready to take to the "motor shop."

If you look closely on that motor, you may spy a small red button
somewhere on the motor itself. This is a RESET BUTTON. If the blade
turns freely (with the power off, pleas!) try pressing this little red
button. Then plug it back in and turn on the power switch'

If this works, send my check to The Salvation Army in a rasonable
amount.


Sorry, no check for you. I hit the reset more times than I can count.
I followed the exact procedures in the troubleshooting guide with no
luck. I did figure out how to get the front faceplate off and that is
where the power cord terminates to the switch. Now I have a frozen
screw that is not allowing me to get to the switch assembly. I sprayed
it with some WD-40 and am letting it soak overnight. I'm guessing that
there is something wrong with that reset switch.
  #19  
Old February 6th 10, 05:37 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 8
Default Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal

On Feb 5, 11:35*pm, mikenj wrote:
On Feb 5, 10:47*pm, Hoosierpopi wrote:





On Feb 3, 2:49*pm, mikenj wrote:


I have a Sears Model Number 113.197150 radial arm saw that is late
eighties/early nineties vintage. The blade jammed into a piece of wood
and now the motor hums, but does not spin when I turn it on. I have
replaced the capacitor, but no luck. I wanted to take the motor off
and have an electric motor shop take a look at it, but I can't figure
out how to disconnect the power cord from the arm. Do I need to take
the arm apart to get to the wire connections or do I try to take the
motor apart? I can't figure out how to take the arm apart to get to
the wires.


On mine, the front plate on the arm is removed and the motor assembly
rolled forward and off the arm. The Electrical cable was held by a
small clamp screwed to the rear of the arm. When I removed the screw
that held the clamp/cable in place, the entire motor assembly was
ready to take to the "motor shop."


If you look closely on that motor, you may spy a small red button
somewhere on the motor itself. This is a RESET BUTTON. If the blade
turns freely (with the power off, pleas!) try pressing this little red
button. Then plug it back in and turn on the power switch'


If this works, send my check to The Salvation Army in a rasonable
amount.


Sorry, no check for you. I hit the reset more times than I can count.
I followed the exact procedures in the troubleshooting guide with no
luck. *I did figure out how to get the front faceplate off and that is
where the power cord terminates to the switch. Now I have a frozen
screw that is not allowing me to get to the switch assembly. I sprayed
it with some WD-40 and am letting it soak overnight. I'm guessing that
there is something wrong with that reset switch.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I was successful in taking the front arm switch assembly apart and
that is where the motor power cord terminates so it was three easy
connections to take apart and I have freed the motor power cord from
the switch. The trick is to figure out how to disassemble the grommet
from the side of the arm where the motor power cord enters without
destroying it.
  #20  
Old February 6th 10, 06:38 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 4,057
Default Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal

On 2/6/10 11:37 AM, mikenj wrote:
The trick is to figure out how to disassemble the grommet
from the side of the arm where the motor power cord enters without
destroying it.


Is it this kind?
http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com/media/2006/02/stress-relief.JPG
http://store.marshamps.com/images/Strain%20relief.jpg

If so, you just have to pinch and pull. The cord can take it.
Slip lock pliers with good knurling should do the trick.


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
http://mikedrums.com

---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply

 




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