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Finger joints



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 24th 09, 01:08 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 52
Default Finger joints

I'd like to join 5/4 boards end to end and am wondering about making
finger joints. There are many router bits available and I'd like some
input of their use. How easy is it to get the board surfaces to be in
the same plane? Lots of adjusting and shimming or does it just
happen? Can it be done with a hand held router? (I've got a router
table but I'll be working with lengths of 8 feet or so which may be
difficult to handle on a router table. (The end result will be
painted, so some blemishes are acceptable)

For the curious, I'm replacing some of the trim boards on my house
that have rotted at the end(s) because no caulk was applied when
installed 15 years ago and I figure it will be cheaper to cut off the
rot and splice a new section than to replace the entire board. 5/4
stock is not cheap! Of course, a scarf joint is a possibility but it
seems as if a finger joint may be the way to go.

Thanks in advance.
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  #3  
Old September 24th 09, 01:37 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 147
Default Finger joints

With finger joints, it's not about the bit, it's about the jig.

Building a well-adjusted BJ jig is very fussy. The alternative is using a DT
jig with a BJ template (you might as well buy the stock).

I have had good luck end-joining painted exterior trim with but joint,
biscuit joined and water-resitant glue. Over a hal-dozed years the latex
paint has kept a continuous skin over the joint.

If you have access to a buiscuit joiner, I'd go that way, otherwise a more
traditional scarf.

A BJ is labor intensive if you're not set up for it and it would look just
plain weird when it telegraphed through the paint.


For the curious, I'm replacing some of the trim boards on my house
that have rotted at the end(s) because no caulk was applied when
installed 15 years ago


I'll take end-priming before caulk any day,

-Steve


  #4  
Old September 24th 09, 01:38 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 52
Default Finger joints

Why better?

On Thu, 24 Sep 2009 07:16:43 -0400, "dadiOH"
wrote:

wrote:
I'd like to join 5/4 boards end to end and am wondering about making
finger joints. There are many router bits available and I'd like some
input of their use. How easy is it to get the board surfaces to be in
the same plane? Lots of adjusting and shimming or does it just
happen? Can it be done with a hand held router? (I've got a router
table but I'll be working with lengths of 8 feet or so which may be
difficult to handle on a router table. (The end result will be
painted, so some blemishes are acceptable)

For the curious, I'm replacing some of the trim boards on my house
that have rotted at the end(s) because no caulk was applied when
installed 15 years ago and I figure it will be cheaper to cut off the
rot and splice a new section than to replace the entire board. 5/4
stock is not cheap! Of course, a scarf joint is a possibility but it
seems as if a finger joint may be the way to go.



Scarfs would be easier and much better.

  #5  
Old September 24th 09, 02:58 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 3,158
Default Finger joints

wrote:
Why better?


When you said "finger joint", I was thinking of this type...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finger_joint

Then I started to think you meant this type...
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/200...-80060611.aspx

If you meant the first type, a scarf would be stronger length-wise against
bow, just as good or better cross-wise, very unlikely to open due to
seasonal/humidity reasons and consequently fewer potential areas for water
to enter and start rot.

If you meant the second type, I guess it would be OK. So would one or more
biscuits.


--

dadiOH
____________________________

dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
______________________


On Thu, 24 Sep 2009 07:16:43 -0400, "dadiOH"
wrote:

wrote:
I'd like to join 5/4 boards end to end and am wondering about making
finger joints. There are many router bits available and I'd like
some input of their use. How easy is it to get the board surfaces
to be in the same plane? Lots of adjusting and shimming or does it
just happen? Can it be done with a hand held router? (I've got a
router table but I'll be working with lengths of 8 feet or so which
may be difficult to handle on a router table. (The end result will
be painted, so some blemishes are acceptable)

For the curious, I'm replacing some of the trim boards on my house
that have rotted at the end(s) because no caulk was applied when
installed 15 years ago and I figure it will be cheaper to cut off
the rot and splice a new section than to replace the entire board.
5/4 stock is not cheap! Of course, a scarf joint is a possibility
but it seems as if a finger joint may be the way to go.



Scarfs would be easier and much better.






  #6  
Old September 24th 09, 03:15 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,207
Default Finger joints

StephenM wrote:
With finger joints, it's not about the bit, it's about the jig.


With finger joints it's at least as much about the bit as the jig. A
dovetail you can adjust by changing the depth. With a finger joint bit and
a jig either the bit's the right diameter or it isn't. It might be possible
to design a jig that allows the spacing to be altered easily by 1/100s of an
inch but I've never seen one.

Might actually be interesting to design.


Building a well-adjusted BJ jig is very fussy. The alternative is
using a DT jig with a BJ template (you might as well buy the stock).


What's a "BJ" in this context?

I have had good luck end-joining painted exterior trim with but joint,
biscuit joined and water-resitant glue. Over a hal-dozed years the
latex paint has kept a continuous skin over the joint.

If you have access to a buiscuit joiner, I'd go that way, otherwise a
more traditional scarf.

A BJ is labor intensive if you're not set up for it and it would look
just plain weird when it telegraphed through the paint.


For the curious, I'm replacing some of the trim boards on my house
that have rotted at the end(s) because no caulk was applied when
installed 15 years ago


I'll take end-priming before caulk any day,

-Steve


  #7  
Old September 24th 09, 03:31 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 2,398
Default Finger joints



"dadiOH" wrote in message news:a3Kum.218835
When you said "finger joint", I was thinking of this type...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finger_joint

Then I started to think you meant this type...

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/200...-80060611.aspx

Completely different applications though. The first is for box type
construction and the second is dedicated to joinery along the lines of panel
construction. Naturally, both benefit from substantial glue surfaces.


  #8  
Old September 24th 09, 05:00 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 147
Default Finger joints


"J. Clarke" wrote in message
...
StephenM wrote:
With finger joints, it's not about the bit, it's about the jig.


With finger joints it's at least as much about the bit as the jig. A
dovetail you can adjust by changing the depth. With a finger joint bit
and
a jig either the bit's the right diameter or it isn't. It might be
possible
to design a jig that allows the spacing to be altered easily by 1/100s of
an
inch but I've never seen one.


You're right; it is possible, but...:
http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/...onna-love-this

Might actually be interesting to design.


By box-joint jig I meant something like this:

http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodwork...box-joint-jig/
I have found that the best way to adjust this type of jig is not to move the
reference pin, but instead, to move the blade by adding or subtracting
stacked dado shims.



Building a well-adjusted BJ jig is very fussy. The alternative is
using a DT jig with a BJ template (you might as well buy the stock).


What's a "BJ" in this context?


Box joint (a.k.a. finger joint) implemented on a "dovetail" jig.

"dovetail jig::
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...0&cookietest=1

"finger joint template" for a "dovetail jig":

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...campaign=V9120

I hope that clarifies,

Steve


  #9  
Old September 24th 09, 06:55 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 4,207
Default Finger joints

StephenM wrote:
"J. Clarke" wrote in message
...
StephenM wrote:
With finger joints, it's not about the bit, it's about the jig.


With finger joints it's at least as much about the bit as the jig. A
dovetail you can adjust by changing the depth. With a finger joint
bit and
a jig either the bit's the right diameter or it isn't. It might be
possible
to design a jig that allows the spacing to be altered easily by
1/100s of an
inch but I've never seen one.


You're right; it is possible, but...:
http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/...onna-love-this


I was thinking in terms of doing it with the router, not the table saw.

I just had an epiphany--with a stacked dado set in the table saw the kerf
can be adjusted in tiny increments, and an Incra jig works as well on the
table saw as it does on the router.

Next time I make box joints I think I'll do it that way--not really used to
having a table saw in the shop yet so it tends to be the last tool I go to.

Might actually be interesting to design.


By box-joint jig I meant something like this:

http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodwork...box-joint-jig/
I have found that the best way to adjust this type of jig is not to
move the
reference pin, but instead, to move the blade by adding or subtracting
stacked dado shims.



Building a well-adjusted BJ jig is very fussy. The alternative is
using a DT jig with a BJ template (you might as well buy the stock).


What's a "BJ" in this context?


Box joint (a.k.a. finger joint) implemented on a "dovetail" jig.


slaps face DUH!


"dovetail jig::
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...0&cookietest=1

"finger joint template" for a "dovetail jig":

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...campaign=V9120

I hope that clarifies,


I've made box joints with the router before--it's always been a crapshoot--I
had one 1/2" bit that cut just right, my other bits are either a tiny bit
oversized (loose joint) or undersized (no way that joint is going to go
together). Then I managed to break the good 1/2" and the replacement (same
brand, same part number) was a little bit under.

  #10  
Old September 24th 09, 07:29 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,657
Default Finger joints

If you are repairing facia trim, then, additionally, no matter what
jointery you use, put a galvanized or aluminum sheet behind the joint
to prevent moisture from getting to your rough framing. If you don't
have galv. or Al. sheeting, felt will do.

Sonny
 




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