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Drawer stops



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 4th 09, 02:16 AM posted to rec.woodworking
PDQ
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Posts: 205
Default Drawer stops



In ng.com,
Jim In FL dropped this bit of wisdom:
I'm thinking of building (by her request actually) my wife a
chest/bureau type piece for our second bedroom. It's general storage,
and not used (open/closed) much. I thought I'd seize the opportunity
to try some things I haven't done before. I'd like to make a real
nice piece of furniture, similar to a cherry dining room sideboard
type thing I remember from my childhood. All wood, frame/panel dust
panels, INSET doors/drawers. (Might even try my first beaded face
frame - don't know if I want to get that nervy with inset doors
though.)

This will be about 16-18" deep, 46-48 long, 42 high. I don't want to
use metal drawer guides - which finally brings me to my question.
I've searched all over and picked up a lot of tips on integrating the
structures that will support and guide the drawers in and out, and
the kickers for tipping, etc. But for some reason everything I've
found is very vague about stopping the drawers, both going in, and
coming out, and the ability to remove them. My thought is that there
should be accepted, common methods to do this (many probably, some
better than others) and since I'm starting with a blank slate, I can
take this opportunity to do it right and learn some new stuff.

Open to all suggestions. Thanks for reading and extra thanks if
you've got something for me !

Jim in FL

(Totally unrelated but had to tell someone - I just made up my mind
- I'm going to buy a Domino. Been thinking about it forever to the
point where every project I do I think "well I could have done it
THIS way if I had a Domino")


Funny thing you should mention:

See "A Few Wooden Drawer Slide Details" on Page 3 of the "Project Journal" on the website www.e-woodshop.net .

This doesn't do much for stopping the drawer (one line about a "button"), but it does a fine job of illustrating a dovetail slide.

This site is by another wreck denizen, but I canjnot remember just who.

P D Q
Ads
  #2  
Old May 4th 09, 02:23 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 4
Default Drawer stops

I'm thinking of building (by her request actually) my wife a chest/bureau
type piece for our second bedroom. It's general storage, and not used
(open/closed) much. I thought I'd seize the opportunity to try some things I
haven't done before. I'd like to make a real nice piece of furniture,
similar to a cherry dining room sideboard type thing I remember from my
childhood. All wood, frame/panel dust panels, INSET doors/drawers. (Might
even try my first beaded face frame - don't know if I want to get that nervy
with inset doors though.)

This will be about 16-18" deep, 46-48 long, 42 high. I don't want to use
metal drawer guides - which finally brings me to my question. I've searched
all over and picked up a lot of tips on integrating the structures that will
support and guide the drawers in and out, and the kickers for tipping, etc.
But for some reason everything I've found is very vague about stopping the
drawers, both going in, and coming out, and the ability to remove them. My
thought is that there should be accepted, common methods to do this (many
probably, some better than others) and since I'm starting with a blank
slate, I can take this opportunity to do it right and learn some new stuff.

Open to all suggestions. Thanks for reading and extra thanks if you've got
something for me !

Jim in FL

(Totally unrelated but had to tell someone - I just made up my mind - I'm
going to buy a Domino. Been thinking about it forever to the point where
every project I do I think "well I could have done it THIS way if I had a
Domino")

  #3  
Old May 4th 09, 02:52 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 27
Default Drawer stops

"Jim In FL" wrote in message
ng.com...

But for some reason everything I've found is very vague about stopping the
drawers, both going in, and coming out, and the ability to remove them. My
thought is that there should be accepted, common methods to do this (many
probably, some better than others) and since I'm starting with a blank
slate, I can take this opportunity to do it right and learn some new
stuff.


Funny you should ask - the June issue of Fine Woodworking has an article on
that very topic.

Tom Dacon

  #4  
Old May 4th 09, 03:33 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,749
Default Drawer stops

"Jim In FL" wrote in
ng.com:

*snip*
This will be about 16-18" deep, 46-48 long, 42 high. I don't want to
use metal drawer guides - which finally brings me to my question.
I've searched all over and picked up a lot of tips on integrating the
structures that will support and guide the drawers in and out, and the
kickers for tipping, etc. But for some reason everything I've found is
very vague about stopping the drawers, both going in, and coming out,
and the ability to remove them. My thought is that there should be
accepted, common methods to do this (many probably, some better than
others) and since I'm starting with a blank slate, I can take this
opportunity to do it right and learn some new stuff.

Open to all suggestions. Thanks for reading and extra thanks if
you've got something for me !

Jim in FL

(Totally unrelated but had to tell someone - I just made up my mind -
I'm going to buy a Domino. Been thinking about it forever to the
point where every project I do I think "well I could have done it THIS
way if I had a Domino")


I've noticed quite a few pieces of furniture don't have stops. With
rails at the top and bottom, the drawer won't start to tip until about
80% out.

The only dresser I remember having stops had a piece of metal sorta like
a filled-in staple at the front of the front brace. The drawer could
then be tipped out for removal, but it would stop the drawer from coming
out too far. The important thing about stops is to make sure the drawers
are still removable.

Congratulations on the Domino purchase decision! I just got a skid steer
to get stuck in the mud. ;-)

Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
rec.woodworking

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  #5  
Old May 4th 09, 03:43 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,091
Default Drawer stops

Not elegant but I sometimes put a screw at each side behind the drawer
to control the depth of closure, jsut twist them in or out a bit to
fine tune.

I have thought about drilling a hole in the drawer bottom at the very
back and dropping in a small bolt that will act as a stop and can
easily be lifet out when needed but I have never actually done it. If
I made kids furniture I might do it.

On May 3, 5:23*pm, "Jim In FL" wrote:
I'm thinking of building (by her request actually) my wife a chest/bureau
type piece for our second bedroom. It's general storage, and not used
(open/closed) much. I thought I'd seize the opportunity to try some things I
haven't done before. *I'd like to make a real nice piece of furniture,
similar to a cherry dining room sideboard type thing I remember from my
childhood. All wood, frame/panel dust panels, INSET doors/drawers. (Might
even try my first beaded face frame - don't know if I want to get that nervy
with inset doors though.)

This will be about 16-18" deep, 46-48 long, 42 high. *I don't want to use
metal drawer guides - which finally brings me to my question. *I've searched
all over and picked up a lot of tips on integrating the structures that will
support and guide the drawers in and out, and the kickers for tipping, etc.
But for some reason everything I've found is very vague about stopping the
drawers, both going in, and coming out, and the ability to remove them. My
thought is that there should be accepted, common methods to do this (many
probably, some better than others) and since I'm starting with a blank
slate, I can take this opportunity to do it right and learn some new stuff.

Open to all suggestions. *Thanks for reading and extra thanks if you've got
something for me !

Jim in FL

(Totally unrelated but had to tell someone - I just made up my mind - I'm
going to buy a Domino. *Been thinking about it forever to the point where
every project I do I think "well I could have done it THIS way if I had a
Domino")


  #6  
Old May 4th 09, 04:29 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 2,304
Default Drawer stops

On Sun, 03 May 2009 20:23:27 -0400, Jim In FL wrote:

But for some reason everything I've found is
very vague about stopping the drawers, both going in, and coming out,
and the ability to remove them.


As far as stopping them going in so that they align with the case front,
I've used faucet washers with brass screws through them. You can get a
little adjustment by how tight you make the screw, and the rubber is
quieter and lessens the shock on the drawer more than wood or metal.

--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw
  #7  
Old May 4th 09, 04:51 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,619
Default Drawer stops


"SonomaProducts.com" wrote

I have thought about drilling a hole in the drawer bottom at the very
back and dropping in a small bolt that will act as a stop and can
easily be lifted out when needed but I have never actually done it. If
I made kids furniture I might do it.
=================================

Funny you should mention that. I used to own a massive oak desk and that is
exactly what they did for both the drawers and the slideout writing
surfaces.

But the bolt the used was a fancy one. All smooth, no threads and a round,
flat top. I think it wa bronze?? It looked similar to what is used on a T
bolt. No idea where to find them. But something stock can be found, I am
sure. It worked well.





  #8  
Old May 4th 09, 06:12 AM posted to rec.woodworking
CC
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Posts: 91
Default Drawer stops


"Lee Michaels" wrote in message
...

"SonomaProducts.com" wrote

I have thought about drilling a hole in the drawer bottom at the
very
back and dropping in a small bolt that will act as a stop and can
easily be lifted out when needed but I have never actually done it.
If
I made kids furniture I might do it.
=================================

Funny you should mention that. I used to own a massive oak desk and
that is exactly what they did for both the drawers and the slideout
writing surfaces.

But the bolt the used was a fancy one. All smooth, no threads and a
round, flat top. I think it wa bronze?? It looked similar to what
is used on a T bolt. No idea where to find them. But something stock
can be found, I am sure. It worked well.


The description almost sounds like the male part of a rivet
They are often made of soft metals for ease of mashing
over the washer side. I remember my father replacing the
pads on brake shoes that were held on with copper rivets,
He had the tool to knock in the rivet (looked like a punch
mounted on a "c" clamp and that was hammered to mash
over the ends of the stud, This was over 50 years ago.
CC

  #9  
Old May 4th 09, 07:03 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 631
Default Drawer stops


"CC" wrote:

The description almost sounds like the male part of a rivet
They are often made of soft metals for ease of mashing
over the washer side.


The "washer" above is called a burr.

I wear a belt I made from nylon strapping material, bronze rings,
assembled with copper rivets and burrs.

Why the above construction?

No magnetic materials involved thus no affect on magnetic compass when
on the helm of a sailboat.

BTW, check a tool and die hardware supplier for the specialty bolt.

A long time ago, back in Cleveland, there was a company named Jergens
Tool who would have had what you need.

Don't even know if they are still in business.

Just Googled, yes they are still around.

Lew


  #10  
Old May 4th 09, 01:33 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 3,154
Default Drawer stops

Jim In FL wrote:
I'm thinking of building (by her request actually) my wife a
chest/bureau type piece for our second bedroom. It's general storage,
and not used (open/closed) much. I thought I'd seize the opportunity
to try some things I haven't done before. I'd like to make a real
nice piece of furniture, similar to a cherry dining room sideboard
type thing I remember from my childhood. All wood, frame/panel dust
panels, INSET doors/drawers. (Might even try my first beaded face
frame - don't know if I want to get that nervy with inset doors
though.)
This will be about 16-18" deep, 46-48 long, 42 high. I don't want to
use metal drawer guides - which finally brings me to my question. I've
searched all over and picked up a lot of tips on integrating the
structures that will support and guide the drawers in and out, and
the kickers for tipping, etc. But for some reason everything I've
found is very vague about stopping the drawers, both going in, and
coming out, and the ability to remove them. My thought is that there
should be accepted, common methods to do this (many probably, some
better than others) and since I'm starting with a blank slate, I can
take this opportunity to do it right and learn some new stuff.
Open to all suggestions. Thanks for reading and extra thanks if
you've got something for me !


1. For slides, there are lots of ways. I usually just rout a groove in the
drawer sides and mount rails to slide in the grooves on the inside of the
cabinet. Groove depth depends upon side thickness but I wouldn't want less
than 14" deep.

The rails should be a hard wood - I like hickory, sometimes white oak. They
should extend almost but not all the way into the grooves...the idea is to
provide the drawer a bit of side to side motion but *very* little. They
should also be a hair thinner top to bottom than the groove is wide to keep
the drawer from tipping. Since they serve to stop the drawer from tipping
they need to be firmly mounted.

2. There are numerous ways to stop a drawer at the proper place when
inserted....one or more bumbers of rubber or wood at the back...vertical
pieces behind the apron at the sides of the drawer opening...

3. To stop the drawer from being pulled out, I like to make the drawer back
higher than the drawer opening. I usually round it over along the top edge
and shape it (ogee) so that it slopes to meet the drawer sides.

To facilitate inserting/removing the drawer, you need to widen the top back
part of the groove in the drawer sides and/or the top front edge of the
rail. Sort of like a rule joint. That allows you to tip the drawer, hook
the top of the back behind the face frame and the slide it in; when pulled
out, the back will hit the face frame and prevent it coming out unless the
front of the drawer is tipped up.


--

dadiOH
____________________________

dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico



 




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